SEARCH SITE
SITE MAP | ADVANCED SEARCH
Listen Live e-pledge
JEFFNET 2
*

ONLINE AUDIO
Back
LINE
*
*
JPR Newsroom

  
The JPR Newsroom maintains an audio archive of some of the feature stories, audio essays and news commentaries produced by the JPR News Team.  You can search the archive by keyword or by the time period the story aired.
 


Audio Archive Search

Keyword: From: To:

Recent Features & Commentaries

Wildlife Rehabers Reverse Damage Caused on Highway
In the rural West, summer is roadkill season. But what happens to animals who live through their encounter with our cars, injured, but not dead? Fish and Wildlife agencies, the police, and most vets don’t take them in. That’s where wildlife rehabilitators come in -- the people who act as the emergency room doctors for injured critters. Jessica Robinson has this story.
7/27/2009
Listen

Savage Rapids Lesson: Removing Dams No Easy Task
After two decades of conflict, crews are finally jackhammering the Savage Rapids Dam into oblivion. The southern Oregon dam on the Rogue River doesn't even produce electricity. Yet, removing it proved complicated and controversial. Efforts to return other rivers to free-flowing channels are getting more attention across the Northwest and in Congress. But what happened with the Savage Rapids Dam gives some indication of how difficult it can be to rip out these engineering feats of the last century. JPR’s Jessica Robinson has this story.
6/19/2009
Listen

Oregon's Poetry Out Loud Finalist Signs Her Words
Today, a high school student from Oregon will appear in a competition in Washington D.C. called Poetry Out Loud. She’s eighteen-year-old Tiffany Hill of Eugene. Poetry Out Loud is a national recitation contest in which teens memorize and deliver classic poems. Only, Hill won’t be saying anything ... at least not out loud. Hill is the first deaf student to compete in the national competition -- she’ll deliver her poems in American Sign Language. JPR’s Jessica Robinson has this profile.

To watch Hill signing "Inside Out" by Diane Wakoski in the state finals, click here.
4/27/2009
Listen

Budget Hearing Highlights Stark Choices
Sometimes the best advice for legislators comes from outside of Salem. That’s what state budget writers are hoping as they take their show on the road. Oregon lawmakers face a widening budget gap and they’re turning to everyday Oregonians for help. The Legislature’s Ways and Means Committee held the first of eight hearings Monday night in Lincoln City, along Oregon’s coast. Chris Lehman has this report.
4/22/2009
Listen

Lawmakers Eye Towing Industry
When you’re stuck by the side of the road, few sights are more welcome than a tow truck. But towing companies are also in the business of towing cars that aren’t broken down ... they’re just parked in the wrong place. This so-called patrol towing is controversial. Oregon lawmakers are moving forward on a bill that’s meant to cut down on the number of people who are towed against their will. Chris Lehman reports.
4/10/2009
Listen

Economy Thwarts Regional Cap-and-Trade Plan
A plan to regulate global warming emissions at the regional level has stalled. The twin culprits are the recession and the arrival of new blood in Washington, D.C. Last year, the governors of seven Western states –- including Oregon and Washington -- agreed to a regional “cap-and-trade” system. But of the seven state legislatures called to endorse to plan, only one -- California’s -- seems in the mood to play along. Tom Banse looks at what happened and what might come next.
4/6/2009
Listen

Chocolatiers Hope We Won't Forego Small Luxuries
With budgets tight in our current economy, many people are giving up the extras in life. Things like new clothes, eating out, and taking weekend trips. But chocolate? This weekend, JPR's Charlotte Duren went to the annual chocolate festival in Ashland to see how the recession is treating this small luxury.
3/9/2009
Listen

Lawmakers Want Voters to Alter Kicker
Oregon has a quirky law called the kicker. That means when times are good and state coffers are flush, taxpayers can expect a kicker refund check in the mail. Times are certainly not flush now, but economists are warning that despite a looming three billion dollar budget deficit, the state could still be in the position of dishing out kicker cash two years from now. A group of Oregon lawmakers introduced a measure Tuesday that would keep that from happening. Chris Lehman explains.
3/4/2009
Listen

Uncertainty in the Air as Oregon Turns 150
Tourism officials are hoping to take advantage of Oregon's 150th birthday, with celebrations galore planned over the coming year. But the hoopla comes during a time of deep economic uncertainty for Oregonians. In honor of the sesquicentennial, we sent Chris Lehman on a 150-mile tour of Oregon’s heartland to see what people are thinking about as the state marks a century and a half.
2/13/2009
Listen

Asphalt Dreams: Construction Ready for Stimulus
The region's construction industry will have to ramp up very fast if the economic stimulus package making its way through Congress is to work as intended. Lawmakers in the nation’s capital -- and in Salem -- are putting out feelers to contractors and trade associations. They want to know if there’s enough asphalt, skilled workers, and bidders to go around if every state and city dumps a load of “ready-to-go” projects at once. Tom Banse reports.
1/27/2009
Listen

State Cuts Depend on Federal Action
Oregon lawmakers may have to take millions of dollars back from schools, cops, and other state-funded programs this spring. Or, they might not. The uncertainty stems from a combination of a quickly widening budget gap and a pending Federal economic bailout. Every day without an answer means the stakes get higher. Chris Lehman explains.
1/26/2009
Listen

Ins and Outs of Federal Stimulus
The federal economic stimulus package making its way through Congress includes billions of dollars for Oregon, Idaho, and Washington. Schools, highway contractors and the bleeding state budget are clear beneficiaries. Tom Banse looked for answers regarding what’s in and what’s out.
1/23/2009

Bush Leaves Rocky Environmental Legacy in the West
The White House recently published a 52-page booklet titled “Highlights and Accomplishments of the Bush Administration.” It mostly dwells on national and international topics, as you’d expect. But the summary of accomplishments also features some Western issues. Here’s correspondent Tom Banse on looking back and looking ahead.
1/15/2009
Listen

Oregon Legislature Reconvenes Amid 'Perfect Storm'
The Oregon Legislature opened its 2009 session Monday with fanfare. But the festive mood soon gave way to the somber reality that lawmakers this year will face one of the most challenging sessions in recent memory. Chris Lehman reports.
1/13/2009
Listen

Water Bottles to Soon Join Bottle Bill
If you live in Oregon, you’re probably familiar with idea of shelling out a nickel deposit on a can of soda or a bottle of beer. Starting Jan. 1, you’ll pay those five extra cents every time you buy a bottle of water, too. It’s the first major change to Oregon’s bottle bill in more than three decades. Chris Lehman tracked the lifecycle of a bottle of water.
12/23/2008
Listen

Senate Candidates Saturate Oregon Airwaves
If you’ve turned on your TV lately, you can’t miss a slew of political ads. If you live in Oregon, the airwaves are saturated with an especially nasty slugfest. Democrat Jeff Merkley is trying to unseat Republican Gordon Smith in one of the most closely watched Senate races in the nation. Correspondent Chris Lehman has more.
9/26/2008
Listen

Measure 59: Tax Fairness or Impending Disaster?
Supporters of Measure 59 on this year’s Oregon ballot say it will end a practice of double taxation.  Opponents mock it as tax fairness ... for millionaires. Both sides agree it will mean the state will lose more than a billion dollars of revenue. Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
9/18/2008
Listen

Measure 54: School Project on the Ballot
Nearly every public high school student has to take a civics class to graduate. That’s where you learn how government works. Some students at a Portland high school put their new-found knowledge into action. The result is Measure 54 on this year’s Oregon ballot. Correspondent Chris Lehman explains.
9/11/2008
Listen

57 and 61: The Dueling Ballot Measures
It’s a case of dueling ballot measures in Oregon this year. Two criminal sentencing proposals are up for consideration. The key difference: The consequences convicted thieves and drug dealers will face. In the end, only one of this year’s crime and punishment ballot measures can win. Correspondent Chris Lehman explains.
9/10/2008
Listen

Measure 55: A Minor Tweak to a Major Beef
Every 10 years, legislative districts are re-mapped based on the ebb and flow of population. It’s a way to make sure that each lawmaker represents roughly the same number of people. To political insiders, few issues are as highly charged as redistricting. This November’s ballot measure on the issue isn’t a hot potato. Still, there are plenty of reasons why lawmakers want Measure 55 to pass. Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
9/9/2008
Listen

Measure 56: Scaling Back the Double Majority
In politics, it’s usually the case that majority rules. But not in Oregon. Over the past decade, hundreds of local tax measures have failed despite getting the majority of votes cast. That’s because of something called the Double Majority rule. But this year, Oregon voters will get the chance to tweak the turnout requirement. Correspondent Chris Lehman explains.
9/8/2008
Listen

Broke Counties Mull Worst-Case Scenarios
Bankruptcy is a common way for people and companies to deal with dire financial straits. But what happens when a government can’t pay its bills? That's a question many rural counties are asking. To find some answers, we sent Chris Lehman to Curry County on the south coast.
7/30/2008
Listen

Roots: What do you buy a tribal elder?
In previous installments, you heard stories on the sacred tradition of Native American root gathering. Now for the story behind those stories. It took four years for correspondent Anna King to gain the trust of Umatilla tribal members before she was invited to participate.
7/4/2008
Listen

Roots: Native Woman Tries to Hold On to Tradition
A middle-aged Native American woman from the Umatilla Reservation near Pendleton, Ore., is taking on a big responsibility. The grandmother wants to teach younger generations how to dig roots, pick berries and sing -- to be Indian. Anna King has this profile.
7/3/2008
Listen

Roots: Native Women Keep Tradition Alive
Each year Native American women travel into the mountains of the Pacific Northwest to dig edible roots for ceremonies and subsistence. In the past few years, the women have had to travel farther away as development and fences have made favorite spots harder to access. In part one of our series, Anna King heads to the hills with Umatilla tribal members.
7/2/2008
Listen

Uncorking the Practices Hidden in Wine
When it comes to wine, it’s not just about where the grapes were grown anymore, but how they were grown. To help people know what they’re buying, Ashland wine connoisseur Jeff Weissler has started a business called Conscious Wine. JPR’s Michael Altman has this profile.
6/13/2008
Listen

Studies Say Hunting Makes Cougar Problems Worse
The conflict between people and predators is an age-old tale in the West. In Oregon, cougars were once nearly hunted to extinction. Now, state officials say, restrictions on hunting have allowed the big cat to get out of hand. They’ve implemented a plan to reduce the population. But scientists, conservationists, and even some ranchers are questioning the plan. They say hunting could backfire. JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports.
5/22/2008
Listen

Clinton Promises Local Crowd She'll Keep Fighting
Hillary Clinton returned to Oregon last night with a stop at the fairgrounds in Central Point, just outside of Medford. The Senator from New York made it clear she plans to stick with her campaign at least through Oregon’s primary on May 20. Jessica Robinson has more.
5/9/2008
Listen

Clinton Courts Rural Voters
In recent primaries, Hillary Clinton has fared especially well with rural voters. She's hoping to repeat her success in Oregon. Clinton is making a stop in Central Point on Thursday. It comes on the heels of an unusual outreach effort here. Chris Lehman reports from Jacksonville.
5/7/2008
Listen

Couple's Effort Keeps 136-Year-Old Mill Churning
The only water-powered flour mill west of the Mississippi sits along Butte Creek in Eagle Point, Ore. In 2005, an adventurous couple from Portland bought the historic landmark. As Julia Sommer reports, they've poured their life savings, heart, soul and ingenuity into renovating the mill.
4/11/2008
Listen

Coastal Salmon Fishers Angle for Relief
Salmon returns to the big rivers of the West –- the Sacramento and the Columbia –- are plummeting. Ocean salmon fishing could be shutdown from northern Oregon all the way to the Mexican border. Tom Banse reports from Coos Bay that fishermen are resigned to pleading for federal disaster relief once more.
4/7/2008
Listen

Albert Maysles: A Social Artist
This year, at the Ashland Independent Film Festival, Albert Maysles will be presented with a Lifetime Achievement Award. In truth, it’s one of many this documentarian has received. His work over 40 years includes films about rockstars, French artists, IBM, Marlon Brando, and a door-to-door Bible selling company. But beyond the subjects he has filmed, Albert Maysles helped redefine a form of art. JPR’s Evan Burchfield has this profile.
4/4/2008
Listen

Senate Democratic Candidates Tout Resumes
Oregon Democrats have their eye on the only Republican holding statewide office. That would be Senator Gordon Smith. The two leading Democrats in the race to unseat Smith are Steve Novick and Jeff Merkley.  Chris Lehman has this story on the two Senate hopefuls.
4/3/2008
Listen

Humor in Politics: Fun, or Just Foolish?
On April First, it’s best to have a good sense of humor. And given that on this particular April Fool’s Day the country is in the midst of election season, we had to wonder: What role should humor play in politics? Bob Davy hit Main Street in Ashland to find out where people stand.
4/1/2008
Listen

Bill Touts Hillary's Candidacy at Medford Stop
Bill Clinton kicked off a campaign swing through Oregon Sunday with a stop in Medford, where the former president rejected the idea that his wife should bow out of the race to avoid a protracted party fight. JPR’s Jessica Robinson has more.
3/31/2008
Listen

Obama Packs Medford Community Center
Presidential contender Barack Obama capped off his first campaign trip to Oregon with a stop in Medford on Saturday. The local visit is a reminder of the significance of Oregon’s May primary in the tight Democratic race. JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports.
3/24/2008
Listen

Ocean Salmon Fishing Outlook Bleak
Word out of a fisheries management meeting in Sacramento is sending shivers though the West Coast salmon fleet. There’s a possibility that ocean salmon fishing will be completely shut down for 2008 from northern Oregon all the way to Mexico. Tom Banse reports.
3/14/2008
Listen

Conservationists Petition to Protect Snails, Slugs
Environmental groups are petitioning the federal government to protect 32 species of Northwest snails and slugs. As Cathy Duchamp reports, they may not be the most high-profile form of wildlife, but conservationists say the invertebrates are crucial to the forest ecosystem.
3/14/2008
Listen

The Jefferson Daily Says Goodbye
Today, the Jefferson Daily is signing off. But first: What does it take to do a half-hour newsmagazine for two decades? A lot of hard work, a lot of rushing around, and a lot of laughter when things go wrong. Today, we look back on some of our favorite moments listeners (hopefully) never heard. Cheers! - Jessica Robinson
 
P.S. A big thank you to all the talented volunteers who've made this program possible.
3/14/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'Retirement' by Diana Coogle
Some people have a career that fills up most of their time while others do a variety of things throughout their lives. As Diana Coogle contemplates "retirement," it seems that word doesn’t apply to her. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
3/13/2008
Listen

Rural Papers Keep their Head Above Water
Smaller, local papers like the ones that cover rural Southern Oregon and Northern California aren't immune to the changing media landscape, but they may be faring better. Bob Hunter, editor of the Medford Mail Tribune, talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson.
3/13/2008
Listen

Out With the Old, In With the New Media
Newspapers across the country are in turmoil, and the thick media markets of California seem to be getting hit especially hard. Rob Schmitz of the California Report has this story on how the economic downturn, lost ad revenue, and the internet are changing the news business.
3/13/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'Yes, deer' by Paula Bandy
Paula Bandy has listened to a lot of Klamath Falls residents bitterly complain about deer devouring their crops, trees, and flowers, but over the years she’s learned to look at them differently. Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
3/12/2008
Listen

Ashland High Delves into Disney Classic
Located just down the boulevard from the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, it’s not surprising that Ashland High School’s theater delivers high quality drama, comedies and musicals. JPR’s Bob Davy talks with drama teacher Betsy Bishop about the current production, “Beauty and the Beast."
3/12/2008
Listen

Pioneering Alert System Gets Off the Ground
It's the holy grail of emergency communication: A clear message heard by a large number of people. Scott Bakker of the Civil Air Patrol in Brookings tells Jessica Robinson about the aerial P.A. system he's received FAA approval for, and how it will be used in a tsunami scare.
3/12/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'Alternative' by Diana Coogle
It’s hard, when we think we understand something, to see it any other way. But as Diana Coogle explains, it’s occasionally necessary to rethink our assumptions to avoid misunderstandings. Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
3/11/2008
Listen

The Bard Behind Bars
For inmates at San Quentin Prison, a trip to the theater is out of the question. But there is an Arts in Corrections program at the Q, and the latest production was "Much Ado About Nothing." Judy Campbell of the California Report caught the show and has this story.
3/11/2008
Listen

Pendleton Group Fills Rural Mental Health Void
The national shortage of child psychiatrists is felt most acutely in rural America. For example, in Oregon, there are only about half-a-dozen psychiatrists east of the Cascades. A group of educators in Pendleton has come up with a solution. Anna King reports.
3/11/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'Landlord' by Diana Coogle
How would you feel if you woke up one day to find that your landlord resembled those tightly wound hypocrites in Dickens novels? Diana Coogle recently awoke to such a nightmare. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
3/10/2008
Listen

Newborn Calves: A sure sign of spring
Newborn calves are the first sure sign that farm country is waking up from its deep winter sleep. Calving season means hard work and late nights. Anna King tromped the fields with one farmer keeping close watch over "his girls." Anna sends this audio postcard.
3/10/2008
Listen

Lesser-Knowns Struggle to be Heard Amid Headliners
Tuesday is the deadline to file to get on the May primary ballot in Oregon. The field is already crowded in the race for the Democratic nomination for U-S Senate. The two front-runners will share the ballot with at least four other candidates. Chris Lehman has this look at the lesser-knowns.
3/10/2008
Listen

ACLU Challenges Medford Panhandling Ordinance
The ACLU says Medford's new panhandling ordinance violates free speech rights. But why are they leaving a similar law in Roseburg alone, and how is panhandling protected by the Constitution? The ACLU of Oregon's David Fidanque talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson.
3/10/2008
Listen

Nature Notes with Frank Lang
Lunar eclipses are understood much better now than they once were; they can even be predicted. But Frank says that hasn't stopped the loony lunar myths. Frank Lang's book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
3/7/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'Latin & Old English' by Diana Coogle
This term at the University of Oregon, commentator Diana Coogle is taking both Latin and Old English, course load proving to be both difficult and fascinating. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
3/6/2008
Listen

Cheese and Wheat Prices Put the Heat on Pizzerias
Americans eat an average of 46 pizza slices a year, which works out to about 23 pounds of pizza. It’s hard to imagine life without this cheap and simple staple. But the rising price of cheese and wheat means even pizza is getting less affordable. JPR's Charlotte Duren reports.
3/6/2008
Listen

Dam Owner Holds Trump Card in Landmark Water Deal
The agreement over Klamath River water, two years in the works, hinges in part on the destruction of four hydroelectric dams. That would be the largest dam removal in U.S. history. But first, as David Gorn reports, the owner of those dams has to agree to the demolition.
3/6/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'Why Write?' by John Fisher-Smith
What do old lawn chairs, a garden shed and robin-dodging worms have to do with being a writer? John Fisher-Smith addresses this question and contemplates connections in an intricate world. Ashland writer John Fisher-Smith's book is called "Opening My Eyes."
3/5/2008
Listen

Reviving a Nearly Forgotten Native Language
The last-known native speaker of Takelma, Frances Johnson, or Kwis-kwis-han, died in 1934. Now two men from Ashland are attempting to bring the native language of the Rogue Valley back to life. JPR's Julia Sommer has this story.
3/5/2008
Listen

Oregon Bottle Bill Expansion on the Horizon
As Chris Lehman reports, some people think Oregon's newly expanded bottle bill doesn’t go far enough. Then Jessica Robinson talks with the owner of Tark’s Market in Talent about how the bill affects grocers, and idea of adopting a bottle return system like California’s.
3/5/2008
Listen

Seabird Decision Puts Question Mark Over WOPR
The federal government has decided not to reduce the amount of old growth forest protected as nesting habitat for the marbled murrelet, a threatened seabird. Conservationists say the decision throws into question a BLM plan to ramp up logging in Western Oregon ...
3/5/2008
Listen

Film Follows the Life of Blind Mountain Biker
Anyone who wants to compare pulled muscles, backaches or scars with Bobby McMullen is going to lose. The fearless Redding native is a blind competitive downhill mountain biker, and the subject of a new film, "The Way Bobby Sees It." McMullen talks with JPR's Valerie Ing-Miller.
3/4/2008
Listen

Sudden Oak Death Spreading, Oregon Fighting Back
A nasty fungus called Sudden Oak Death has plagued California since the mid-90s and now it’s spreading into the Northwest. Right now Sudden Oak Death is still contained to Curry County. That’s where 166 acres have been put off limit to oak tree harvest. Anna King has more.
3/4/2008
Listen

'Modern Millie' Thoroughly Revived for Teens
A cast of 55 singers, dancers and actors, and an 18-piece orchestra are evoking the Jazz Age in “Thoroughly Modern Millie” at Medford’s Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy went to a rehearsal, and talked with director Jahnna Beecham.
3/3/2008
Listen

California's Budget Question: To Tax or Not to Tax
California lawmakers will meet again in committee this week to work on closing the state's multi-billion dollar budget gap. They’ll likely be grappling for months with one key issue: can the budget hole be filled without new taxes? Marianne Russ reports.
3/3/2008
Listen

Breaking Down Chemical, Economic Walls of Biofuels
Global warming and rising gas prices have just about everyone touting biofuels. California in particular is on the cutting edge of this new technology. But as Andrea Kissack of the California Report explains, a number of scientific and economic barriers remain.
3/3/2008
Listen

Nature Notes with Frank Lang
Frank marvels at the obstinate Himalayan blackberry, found along many stream banks and on most gardeners' nerves in the region. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by JPR.
2/29/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'Washing Machine' by Diana Coogle
Living without electricity has been a badge of honor for Commentator Diana Coogle, but the absence of one particular modern convenience is getting to her. Author Diana Coogle spends part of her week in Eugene, studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
2/28/2008
Listen

'Many Moons' Finds Happy Medium for Kids, Adults
Writer and cartoonist James Thurber said, “Laughter need not be cut out of anything, since it improves everything.” And Thurber practiced what he preached. A play based on his children’s book, “Many Moons,” is now showing at SOU. JPR's Bob Davy talks with director Chris DuVall.
2/28/2008
Listen

When Green Goes Mainstream
Green products and green practices have permeated the culture, achieving trendy status even. Green Living editor Linda Pinkham, a longtime green advocate, talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson about the benefits and pitfalls of all the attention.
2/28/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'Kokopelli' by Paula Bandy
Commentator Paula Bandy recently put her feet up and thought she was settling in for a cozy night beside her toasty stove, but fire and a benevolent, ancient water god changed her plans. Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
2/27/2008
Listen

'It was like nothing else I'd ever listened to'
An Ashland musician is trying to bring the music style of Southern Spain to Southern Oregon. Guitarist Grant Ruiz has done the rock thing, the jazz thing and the classical guitar thing, but he says nothing compares to the raw emotion of flamenco. We asked Ruiz to show us why.
2/27/2008
Listen

D.C. Grazing Hearing Takes Odd Tone: Consensus
A US Senate subcommittee held a hearing Wednesday involving one of the most controversial issues in the West: grazing. Yet the theme of the hearing was compromise. As JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports, the compromise is over a unique piece of land in Southern Oregon.
2/27/2008
Listen

Church Not on the Minds of Oregonians
Oregonians are less likely to belong to a church than people in any other state. That’s one of the findings of a new study by the Pew Research Center. Correspondent Chris Lehman reports about 27 percent of Oregon adults say they don’t belong to any religious group.
2/27/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'Connoisseur of Snow' by Will Brophy
Spring is stepping out in some parts of the region. But when you live at 4,500 feet in far northern California, and the closest city to you is Shingletown ... winter is still very present. Will Brophy has this dispatch from winter’s stronghold. Will Brophy is a retired biology professor.
2/26/2008
Listen

Tater Tots: From Cattle Feed to Retro Cache
You probably know it as a staple of school cafeterias: the tater tot. Yet the tot is transcending it’s humble origins. It’s now appearing in trendy bars and restaurants all over America. And there’s a reason for locavores -- or local food advocates –- to pick up on the trend: Those crispy potato nuggets were invented on the Idaho-Oregon border. Guy Hand has this profile of the tot.
2/26/2008
Listen

Under 30 Crowd Heads to Polls, Egged On by Peers
Turnout in the primaries so far indicates voters under 30 are one of the fastest-growing voter blocs. Part of the push to get young people to vote is coming from other young people. JPR's Charlotte Duren reports on local efforts, and the challenges student organizers face.
2/26/2008
Listen

Native American Oral History ... In Opera Form
An opera singer and a composer in California have teamed up on what they're calling it an "ethno-historical cantata." It's based on the oral history of a Native American woman who was one of the last members of her tribe to speak her people's language. Sasha Khokha of the California Report has this story.
2/25/2008
Listen

Recall Drive Could Change Balance of Power in CA
The top Democrat in the California Senate is behind a campaign to recall a Republican colleague from office. It’s a move that could significantly affect the balance of power in the state legislature. Jenny O’Mara reports.
2/25/2008
Listen

Test-Run of Annual Session Wraps Up Early
The Oregon capitol is again quiet. Lawmakers adjourned their February special session late Friday night. Salem reporter Chris Lehman talks with Jessica Robinson about what was passed, what wasn't, and what lawmakers are saying about meeting every year.
2/25/2008
Listen

Nature Notes with Frank Lang
Frank notices spring peeking furtively out here and there in the wintry landscape. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
2/22/2008
Listen

Oregon Mental Health Care to Make Fresh Start
Some of Oregon’s most vulnerable residents are at risk according to a federal report on the Oregon State Hospital for the mentally ill. Some problems are being fixed. But officials say others won’t be resolved until two new mental hospitals open. Chris Lehman reports.
2/22/2008
Listen

Iraq War Takes the Stage as New OSF Season Opens
The Oregon Shakespeare Festival is premiering a play set a long way from Elizabethan England. "Welcome Home, Jenny Sutter" is about a soldier returning from Iraq. JPR’s Evan Burchfield reports on the playwright's desire to leave politics to the audience.
2/22/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'Swimming' by Diana Coogle
There’s nothing like learning something about a topic you thought you knew. Commentator Diana Coogle has been taking swimming courses -– which at one time, she taught. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
2/21/2008
Listen

Quilt Makers Harnessed to Comfort Iraq Vets
We keep hearing about them: suicides by Iraq War vets. One Northwest woman was so taken by the death of a vet, she started a movement. The Vashon Island quilt maker inspired others around the nation to make blankets to give to wounded soldiers. Tom Banse reports.
2/21/2008
Listen

Student Struck in Crosswalk Dies
An SOU student died Wednesday after being in intensive care for a week. On Feb. 13, Gladys Jimenez was hit by a car while crossing Siskiyou Blvd. in front of the university. The driver is an SOU employee. JPR’s Charlotte Duren reports on how the school is handling the death.
2/21/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'The Beekeeper' by Madeleine DeAndreis
A long winter’s sting is nothing new to Siskiyou County’s residents, but thanks to an unusual Christmas gift, commentator Madeleine DeAndreis has a special reason to wish winter gone. She joins us now to give us the buzz about it.
2/20/2008
Listen

Singer From Selma to Perform for Millions
A singer from Southern Oregon performs for 28 million plus TV viewers tonight. Kristy Lee Cook of Selma, Ore., is among the 24 finalists on American Idol. The Fox show has touted Cook’s country roots -- being raised in a log cabin -- and that she sold her horse to get on the show ...
2/20/2008
Listen

'Sockdology' Imagines Actors Post Lincoln Shooting
A play at Camelot Theater in Talent, Ore., imagines the lives of actors at Ford’s Theater in the aftermath of the assassination of Lincoln. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talks with assistant director Richard Moeschel, first asking him to explain the title, "Sockdology."
2/20/2008
Listen

Campus in Uproar Over Trustee's Anti-Islam Remarks
Adding new courses at College of the Siskiyous is usually a quiet, routine matter for the school in Weed, Calif. -- but no longer. Last month, a trustee of the college took vehement exception to adding courses in Arabic and Middle Eastern history. JPR's Julia Sommer reports.
2/20/2008
Listen

Group Gives Voice to Autistic Kids' Creative Side
The Autism Group Foundation has scheduled a series of classes at Oregon Stage Works to introduce the theater experience to a group of young people who don’t often have an opportunity to be on stage. The group's Janel Salazar and Herb Heiman talk with JPR’s Bob Binnewies.
2/19/2008
Listen

Gloomy Budget Forecast Cramps Lawmakers' Style
Oregon lawmakers are calling this month’s special session a way to see what it’s like to meet every year.  But with budget forecasts shrinking, some feel stopped in their tracks. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
2/19/2008
Listen

Book Chosen for Reading Program Apropos to County
Now that Jackson County’s libraries are back, so is a county-wide reading project. The book chosen for this year’s Jackson County Reads program is “Fahrenheit 451” by Ray Bradbury. Organizers say the thematic relevance to the county is not lost on them ...
2/19/2008
Listen

Close Race has Superdelegate 'Soul Searching'
In the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, a wild card could come into play this year: the nearly 800 “superdelegates” who can support any candidate they choose. JPR's James Adams speaks with Rachel Binah, a superdelegate on the Mendocino coast.
2/18/2008
Listen

Obama or Mad Max? LA Confonts Ballot Problems
Two weeks after California’s presidential primary, thousands of votes are still being counted. In Los Angles, election officials are figuring out how to count some 50,000 ballots filled out by decline-to-state or independent voters. Rob Schmitz of the California Report explains that the so-called “double bubble trouble.”
2/18/2008
Listen

Oregon Primary May have Sway
Some thought the race for the presidential nomination would end in both parties on Super Tuesday. Instead, the race seems to have only gotten more complicated. Oregon’s primary is still a way’s off. It’s among the last five held this election season, making some Oregonians wonder if their primary matters at all. JPR's Evan Burchfield reports.
2/18/2008
Listen

Nature Notes with Frank Lang
Frank vividly remembers a farm practice he learned about in childhood: caponization. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
2/15/2008
Listen

High Schoolers Bring Back Days of the Typewriter
In Phoenix, Ore., the senior project of two ambitious students has hit the stage. It’s an original musical about a 1940s newsroom called “Deadlined.” JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talks with Dan Daly, who wrote the music, and Conrad Hulen who wrote the lyrics.
2/15/2008
Listen

Earliest Known Recording of 'Howl' at Reed College
It was one of the influential poems of the 20th century. Reed College in Portland is home to the first known recording of Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl.” A literary scholar discovered a reel-to-reel recording in the Reed archives last summer ...
2/15/2008
Listen

Birds, Birders Flock to Pit Stop on Pacific Flyway
Birders are descending on the Klamath Basin for the start of the Winter Wings Festival. As JPR's Jessica Robinson reports, this marshy pocket of land is considered one of the best places to see migrating birds, and this year unusually large numbers have shown up.
2/15/2008
Listen

Library Workers Retain Union Rights
Complaints from Jackson County library workers got the attention of the National Labor Relations Board. And the new private operator of the libraries has agreed to uphold union rights from before the library closures last April. JPR's Charlotte Duren has more.
2/15/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'Left-Over Lover' by Diana Coogle
Valentine's Day isn’t traditionally known for its honesty, but if we’re going to talk about love, let’s face it: it’s not all flowers and candy. Diana Coogle brings us this story from her past of Love Gone Bad. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
2/14/2008
Listen

Oregon Turns 149, Going on 150
Governor Ted Kulongoski joined lawmakers and other state officials at the Capitol Rotunda today for Oregon’s 149th birthday party, starting the countdown to when the state turns 150 in 2009. That gives Oregonians exactly one year to learn how to say "sesquicentennial" ...
2/14/2008
Listen

Hit SOU Student Worries Pedestrian-Heavy Town
A Southern Oregon University student is in serious condition after she was struck by a car Wednesday evening. In a town where walking is a frequent mode of transportation, police say it's important that drivers and pedestrians keep an eye out at crosswalks.
2/14/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'Mum & Ship's Captain' Fisher-Smith
Tomorrow is Valentine’s Day. Since the 17th century, lovers young and old have celebrated and reflected on partnership on February 14th. Ashland writer John Fisher-Smith recalls one surprising courtship involving his mother and a ship’s captain.
2/13/2008
Listen

Barnstormers Return to '29 Berlin in 'Cabaret'
It was November 1966 when the provocative musical "Cabaret" opened on Broadway. Set in 1929 Germany, "Cabaret" reflects the joys and fears of that time. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talks with Daniel Grossbard, director of the production at the Barnstormers Theater in Grants Pass.
2/13/2008
Listen

Oregon Lawmakers Eye Mortgage Brokers
The Bush administration is throwing a lifeline to people caught up in the wave of foreclosures sweeping the nation. Meanwhile, Oregon lawmakers are trying to make it less likely that homeowners will need to be rescued in the first place. Correspondent Chris Lehman has more.
2/13/2008
Listen

Plant-Rich Eight Dollar Mountain to be State Park
Eight Dollar Mountain in the Illinois Valley has been purchased by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. It has one of the highest concentrations of rare plants in the state. Park system officials say they don't intend to build major campgrounds or trails on the land ...
2/13/2008
Listen

Local Printmakers Create Eco-Friendly Enclave
Last year, a $4 million budget shortfall at Southern Oregon University put the art department’s printmaking program on the chopping block. Loud public outcry resulted. Eventually printmaking at SOU was kept. The region’s art scene includes a dedicated group of printmakers. JPR’s Michael Altman visited one artist who wants to bring the medium to a larger audience.
2/12/2008
Listen

Eastward Ho! Idaho Draws West Coasters
Oregonians complain about Californians' migration to their state. Now Idahoans may have cause to complain about both. Idaho is the Northwest’s fastest-growing state, due in part to newcomers from California, Washington and Oregon. From Boise, Guy Hand reports.
2/12/2008
Listen

Nature Notes with Frank Lang
Frank traces his route through Patagonia. It was similar to Charles Darwin's, though significantly shorter and less treatcherous. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
2/8/2008

'Monologues' Reaches Out to Spanish Speakers
Ten years running, around Valentine’s Day, university students across the country have performed “The Vagina Monologues.” The play’s frank way of talking about women and violence against women broke new ground in the late ‘90s. This year’s production at Southern Oregon University has a bilingual twist. JPR's Charlotte Duren reports.
2/8/2008
Listen

Coastal Storms Uncover Mysterious Old Ship
Erosion caused by high ocean waves is making home owners nervous, but historians are having a field day. In the Coos Bay area, an old shipwreck is emerging from a sand dune worn away by recent storms. The BLM's Megan Harper talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson.
2/8/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'Apartment Living' by Diana Coogle
Sometimes when we change our lives, we run into problems we hadn’t bargained for. Commentator Diana Coogle had to make some adjustments living in an apartment. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
2/7/2008
Listen

O'Brian Novels Set the Program for Orchestra
The Jefferson Baroque Orchestra's upcoming concert is inspired by a popular series of historical fiction by Patrick O’Brian. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talks with Jefferson Baroque artistic director Jim Rich about constructing a concert from fiction.
2/7/2008
Listen

Oregon State Police in Line for Budget Boost
Oregon lawmakers won’t know until tomorrow how much money they’ll be able to spend during this legislative session. But there seems to be a consensus that a good chunk of the funds will go towards hiring more state police. Chris Lehman has more.
2/7/2008
Listen

End of '08 Target for Opening Josephine Libraries
Library advocates in Josephine County say they hope to raise enough money to re-open the county library system by the end of the year. The four-branch system closed in May for lack of money. A citizens' group
is adopting a funding model borrowed from public broadcasting ...
2/7/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'Secret Ballot' by Madeleine DeAndreis
Commentator Madeleine DeAndreis says in an election year, when political opinions are often flamboyantly on display, it’s good to remember the virtues of the "secret" ballot. Madeleine DeAndreis is a writer, teacher and avid voter living in Siskiyou County.
2/6/2008
Listen

Clinton, McCain Not Picked in All Corners of CA
Some counties in Northern California bucked the statewide trend on election night, choosing Obama over Clinton, or Romney over McCain. Correspondent Dave Brooksher visited polling sites Humboldt County to find what drove the choices of voters there.
2/6/2008
Listen

Fears of Library Commercialization Don't Pan Out
In October, Jackson County began an unusual public policy experiment: hand over management of the county libraries to a private company. Some people wondered what privatization would do to the public institutions. JPR's Evan Burchfield went to find out.
2/6/2008
Listen

Red Patches Prepare for Primary in Blue State
Pundits often talk about California as a blue state -- sure to end up in the Democrats' column come November. In fact, California is both a blue and red state, with plenty of Republicans. Sasha Khokha of the California Report got a read on how Republican voters view their choices.
2/5/2008
Listen

Mad Rush to the Finish in Golden State
Super Tuesday is finally here. And in California, where Hillary Clinton once held a solid lead, polls suggest Barack Obama has caught up. Neither candidate wants to lose the 370 delegates the Golden State offers.  Ben Adler reports on the furious final campaigning.
2/5/2008
Listen

Snow Threatens to Cave-In Klamath Roofs
Heavy snow build-up is causing structural problems in Klamath Falls. On Monday, part of the roof of the nearly 80-year-old Balsiger Building collapsed. Some schools in the area have closed while crews remove several feet of snow from the roof ...
2/5/2008
Listen

Can Migrating Whales and Wave Energy Coexist?
This winter, researchers from Oregon State University are using surveyors' tools to chart the gray whale migration off the Northwest Coast. The goal: to learn if the migration paths run right through the planned locations of wave energy parks. Tom Banse has more.
2/5/2008
Listen

Military Families Consider Next Commander in Chief
For families who have loved ones serving in the U.S. military, the Iraq war trumps other issues in the presidential election. Scott Shafer of the California Report traveled to the Northern California town of Woodland and sat down with military families to talk politics.
2/4/2008
Listen

Oregon Legislature Convenes 'Very' Special Session
Today was the first day of an unprecedented special session of the Oregon Legislature. The month-long gathering is billed as a trial run of annual sessions. But as Chris Lehman reports, this experiment is starting to look a lot like business as usual.
2/4/2008
Listen

Gay Couples Leave Courthouses as Domestic Partners
County offices around Oregon began registering same-sex couples for the first time today under the state’s new domestic partnership law. The law gives them many of the rights of married couples in Oregon. JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports.
2/4/2008
Listen

Nature Notes with Frank Lang
Frank remembers the Ashland oak that perished in the Great Snowstorms of '08 (aka, the storms earlier this week). Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
2/1/2008

Actors Brush Up on Their British for 'Witness'
Agatha Christie is known her sharp-eyed detectives, out and about solving murders. But Christie also knew how to write a good courtroom drama. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talks with Brian Wallace, co-director of Oregon Stage Works' production of “Witness for the Prosecution.”
2/1/2008
Listen

Short Staffed Avalanche Center Copes in Rough Year
An avalanche warning at Mt. Shasta has just been lifted, but officials are keeping an eye on conditions at the mountain ... Well, actually it’s more like “official.” In the midst of avalanche season, one ranger is doing the advisory work normally done by two. JPR's Charlotte Duren reports.
2/1/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'Ela's Bathtub' by Diana Coogle
When most of us look around our house, we see a lot of things that came from stores and probably not very many things we made by hand. But some people do have the skills to construct their surroundings. Diana Coogle has this story about the delight of the hand-crafted. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
1/31/2008
Listen

Storm Waves Mounting ... Sign of Climate Change?
For a lot of us, it would be a dream to own a second home on the coast. But for some people who’ve achieved that dream, it’s turning into a headache this winter. Pounding storms are eroding and flooding beachfront property. Tom Banse reports.
1/31/2008
Listen

Indian Gaming Up for Vote in Series of Props
California Voters will decide Tuesday if four Indian tribes will be allowed to greatly expand their gambling operations. Jenny O’Mara continues our series on California’s ballot measures with this look at Propositions 94, 95, 96 and 97.
1/31/2008
Listen

Like Hollywood, Lawmakers Borrow From the News
It’s not just Hollywood writers who love to borrow ideas from the headlines. So do lawmakers. Every legislative session brings a new round of bills that respond to issues in the news. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman picked out a few expected to come up in this year’s session.
1/31/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'Snow Gift' by Paula Bandy
Snowstorms have pummeled the region, making travel treacherous in some places. Paula Bandy, finding herself nose-down in a ditch, discovers the winter storms haven't put a chill on goodwill. Paula Bandy is a writer in the Klamath Basin.
1/30/2008
Listen

Singers Plan Trip to Eastern Europe
The Siskiyou Singers, a Southern Oregon choral group, is planning a trip to Eastern Europe this summer. For that, of course, they need money. On Friday, the group is putting on a fundraising concert appropriately titled “Music Connects the World.” JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talks with long-time Siskiyou Singer Bunny Lewis.
1/30/2008
Listen

Prop 93: Smart Politics or Lawmaker Job Security?
One measure California lawmakers will be watching very carefully come election night is Proposition 93.  The constitutional Amendment would change the way term limits work in California. Marianne Russ has the latest in our series on California’s ballot propositions.
1/30/2008
Listen

Gay Rights Advocates Debate Strategy for Marriage
Oregon’s domestic partnership law is on hold right now, waiting for its day in court. Meanwhile, gay rights advocates in Washington state are setting a bold goal: legalize same-sex marriage within a decade. Behind the scenes there’s a debate over how to achieve that goal. Austin Jenkins reports.
1/29/2008
Listen

Exhibit Explores Torture Through Abu Ghraib Images
President Bush’s final State of the Union address didn't delve much into legacy ... But that’s not stopping others people. An exhibit at Southern Oregon University critical of the Bush administration implies part of the its legacy can be summed up through the grainy photographs taken at Abu Ghraib in Iraq. Artist Midge Black talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson.
1/29/2008
Listen

Prop 92 Divides California Educators
Presidential candidates are getting most of the attention, but there are also seven propositions on California’s Feb. 5 ballot. Proposition 92, which deals with community college funding, has divided the education community. Jenny O’Mara reports.
1/29/2008
Listen

Dell'Arte Finds Golden State's Darker Side
Since the early 1970s, the Humboldt County town of Blue Lake has been home to Dell'Arte International, a world-renowned theater company and school. The inspiration for their latest play is the not-so-sunny side of California. Lisa Morehouse of the California Report has this story.
1/28/2008
Listen

Supporters Abandon California's Prop 91
It’s a rarity in the world of politics. A group spends millions to put an initiative on the ballot –- and then tells people not to vote for it. That’s what’s happened with California’s transportation funding measure known as Proposition 91. Marianne Russ explains.
1/28/2008
Listen

Wyden Says Infrastructure Work is Economic Fix
President Bush is expected to talk economy in his final State of the Union address tonight. He's pushing for tax rebates. But even there, the president and Democrats aren’t seeing completely eye to eye. Oregon Senator Ron Wyden talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson.
1/28/2008
Listen

Ashland Digs Out of Deepest Snow Dump in 60 Years
Ashland residents, if you're thinking you haven't seent his much snow in a long time ... you're right. According to the National Weather Service it's been almost 60 years since Ashland saw 10 inches of snow on the ground ...
1/28/2008
Listen

Nature Notes with Frank Lang
Frank looks at the species of bird that gathers in a "murmur" ... and explains what these murmurs, schools of fish, and politicians might have in common. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
1/25/2008
Listen

Poet Robert Burns Still 'Brought to Mind'
Today is the birthday of Robert Burns, the Scottish poet we can thank for "Auld Lang Syne," as well as lines that inspired the titles “Catcher in the Rye” and “Of Mice and Men.” JPR's Bob Davy talks with musician Brian Freeman, who celebrates Burns' birthday every year in Ashland.
1/25/2008
Listen

Study Shows Some Grazing Impacts ... Is it Enough?
The BLM has finally released the scientific studies that will determine the future of grazing on the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument. The studies are some of the most extensive done on grazing in the West, but as JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports, they don't offer an easy answer.
1/25/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'Atlanta Drought' by Diana Coogle
As candidates make their way around the country, peddling the promise of better health care, a stronger economy and tougher homeland security ... commentator Diana Coogle says one issue is strangely absent. She’s surprised the top presidential contenders aren’t saying more about global warming.
1/24/2008
Listen

Meth Labs, Armed Men ... Game Wardens Have Seen It
California's lead environmental cops are having a hard time enforcing wildlife laws. It's a dangerous job, and the governor’s proposed budget would make Fish and Game staff even thinner. Tamara Keith of the California Report has this story.
1/24/2008
Listen

Williams Parents Worry Deficit Will Close School
Budget issues are worrying parents in the Three Rivers School District. Lack of funding because of small enrollment is leaving the Southern Oregon district with some tough decisions. Jefferson Public Radio’s Charlotte Duren reports.
1/24/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'The Creative' by John Fisher-Smith
For John Fisher-Smith, a project involving an espaliered fig tree reminds him of the creative process in all of us. John Fisher-Smith is looking forward to the publication of his memoirs.
1/23/2008
Listen

Stage Group Brings Back 'Theater of the Mind'
At the moment, the Hollywood writers strike is putting a dent in many Americans’ weekly routine. Go back 60 years though, and TV barely figured into anyone’s routine. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy met a Grants Pass group that's reviving old radio comedies and dramas.
1/23/2008
Listen

California Hopes Local Facilities Can Ease Prisons
One of the solutions to California’s burgeoning prison population might come at the local level. "Re-entry facilities" around the state would help inmates return to life outside prison walls. And Shasta County is considering signing up for one. JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports.
1/23/2008
Listen

Upcoming Satellite Will Search for Carbon “Sinks”
Does the Northwest produce more of a key global warming gas than its plant life absorbs? A satellite about to be launched will track sources and “sinks” of heat-trapping carbon dioxide from an orbit hundreds of miles above the earth. Tom Banse reports.
1/22/2008
Listen

Health Care Solutions Scrutinized in Salem
A panel studying options for universal health care in Oregon is due to present recommendations to lawmakers next fall. In the meantime, Oregon is reaching out to other states for answers. Chris Lehman reports on discussions at a recent health care summit in Salem.
1/22/2008
Listen

King Honored 40 Years After Assassination
Southern Oregon joined in the national celebration of civil rights leader Martin Luther King today. We hear what people in Ashland had to say at a packed event and what King himself had to say about his legacy in a speech 40 years ago.
1/21/2008
Listen

California Voters Ready for their Close-Up
The January primaries haven’t turned out a clear choice for president in either party. Enter California: In this year's tight race, California's primary looks like a must-win for candidates from both parties. Rob Schmitz of the California Report has this story.
1/21/2008
Listen

Officials Hash Out Nitty-Gritty of Ethics Law
Oregon’s ethics commission is hashing out the details of a pair of ethics laws passed by the Oregon legislature last year. They severely limit the kind and amount of gifts that public officials can receive. Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
1/21/2008
Listen

Nature Notes with Frank Lang
What's up with the way snow leaves a space around trees? The answer, says Frank, lies in the principles of microclimatology. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
1/18/2008
Listen

Creamery Mixes the Traditional and Experimental
Every year, the Rogue Creamery is the recipient of various domestic and international awards for its cheddar and blue cheeses. The company has stayed true to its legendary founding cheesemakers, but it's not afraid of trying new things either. JPR’s Michael Altman reports.
1/18/2008
Listen

Corps Tries to Entice Terns Away from Baby Salmon
The Army Corps of Engineers wants to relocate some Caspian terns that gobble up threatened baby salmon at the mouth of the Columbia River. Correspondent Tom Banse reports on the first of six new nesting islands being specially built in Oregon and Northern California.
1/18/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'Hello?' by Madeleine DeAndreis
Middle-aged women voters from South Carolina to California are being courted by presidential candidates hoping this bloc can sway the vote in their direction. Commentator Madeleine DeAndreis says election season is one of the few times her demographic gets noticed.
1/16/2008
Listen

Their Grapes Aren't the Only Thing Kissed by Sun
Winemakers and grape growers worry that climate change could hurt their crops and even put them out of business. Some wineries are now installing solar electric systems, trying to do their part by reducing their carbon footprint. Cy Musiker of the California Report has this story.
1/16/2008
Listen

Lawmakers Pledge to Keep it Simple Next Month
Oregon is one of only six states whose legislature meets every two years instead of every year. That could change. Lawmakers are about to give annual sessions a test drive. JPR's Julia Sommer found out what Southern Oregon lawmakers hope to accomplish.
1/16/2008
Listen

'Diving Bell' Producer Screens Film in Hometown
After growing up in Redding, Kathleen Kennedy made a name for herself in a city of big names -- Hollywood. "E.T.," "Schindler's List" and "The Sixth Sense" are among Kennedy's credits. But in 2007, she turned her attention to a smaller, French movie called "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly," which won the Golden Globe for best foreign language film. Kennedy returns to her hometown Saturday for a screening. She talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson.
1/15/2008
Listen

Law's Language Gives Lawmakers Wiggle Room
Now that Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger has declared a fiscal emergency, California lawmakers are required to hold a special session. But what are they actually required to do? Turns out the law is a little vague on that point. Marianne Russ reports.
1/15/2008
Listen

Picture of Clearcut Triggers Debate
A single newspaper photograph has triggered a debate over logging practices in the Northwest. The photo shows a clear-cut hillside that slid into a creek during last month’s storms. A University of Washington Professor and timber giant Weyerhaeuser faced-off Thursday at a Washington legislative hearing. Correspondent Austin Jenkins reports.
1/11/2008
Listen

Nature Notes with Frank Lang
For some strange reason, Frank is inspired to discuss snow, it's formed, and the myth of Eskimoan snow terminology. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
1/11/2008
Listen

Drivers License Debate Hits Oregon Statehouse
Oregon lawmakers are about to take on the contentious issue of whether illegal immigrants should be allowed to have drivers’ licenses. A panel today is reviewing possible legislation for the upcoming special session in February. Correspondent Chris Lehman has more.
1/11/2008
Listen

Animal Advocates Ask Oregon to Dump Cougar Plan
Oregon wildlife officials are placing tougher restrictions on volunteer houndsmen that hunt cougars for the state. Hunters who have violated animal protective laws will be ineligible. But as JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports, environmentalists call the change a minor improvement.
1/11/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'Global Warming' by Diana Coogle
Global warming certainly is a familiar term these days. Commentator Diana Coogle recently got to go beyond the headlines and investigate the matter for herself. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
1/10/2008
Listen

Western States Meet to Design Cap-and-Trade System
The conversation about how to respond to global climate change on a regional level got down to brass tacks today in Portland. Representatives of western states and provinces have gathered to design a cap-and-trade system to reduce greenhouse gas pollution. Correspondent Tom Banse talks with Western Climate Initiative chair Janice Adair.
1/10/2008
Listen

Wave Energy Projects Sprout Up Off the Coast
The hunt to harness energy from the ocean waves is focusing on the northwest coast, from Eureka, Calif., in the south to British Columbia in the north. And there are signs of progress. Jefferson Public Radio’s Julia Sommer has more.
1/10/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'A Day in the Life' by Paula Bandy
There’s nothing like car troubles to ruin your day. But as commentator Paula Bandy found, sometimes you need those problems to mix life up a bit. Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
1/9/2008
Listen

Storms Only Temporary Relief for CA Water Woes
If climate change predictions come true -- predictions about the loss of snow pack, the warm winter storms, dry rivers in the summer -- California's water supply system could be drastically altered. Tamara Keith of the California Report has this story.
1/9/2008
Listen

Iraqi Translator Finds a New Home in Pacific NW
The Bush administration has vowed to resettle 12-thousand Iraqi refugees in the United States by next fall. A handful of Iraqi refugees have cut through the federal bureaucracy and now make their homes in the Northwest. Anna King brings us the story of a former interpreter.
1/8/2008
Listen

Farms Getting Back on Their Feet in Flood Zone
The number of Western Washington and Oregon households and businesses that have applied for federal disaster assistance has crossed the 11,000 mark. As Tom Banse reports, the area hit by last month’s floods includes an unusual concentration of small family farms.
1/8/2008
Listen

Governor Vows to Stop Financial 'Binge and Purge'
California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger gave his state of the state address this afternoon. The state is facing a $14 billion budget deficit. In his speech, Schwarzenegger proposed a constitutional amendment that would give him more power to cut state spending ...
1/8/2008
Listen

Residents Near BLM Land Protest Logging Plan
Large crowds gathered at the BLM offices in Medford today to rally against a proposal to expand timber harvests in the region. Illinois Valley residents, who neighbor public forestland, say they're frustrated the BLM is emphasizing old growth cuts over thinning projects ...
1/8/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'Reunion' by Diana Coogle
Visiting her siblings last month, Diana Coogle discovered it's not how you play the game, it's who you play it with. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
1/3/2008
Listen

Nunez: California Budget Formula Needs a Rewrite
Even before it began, 2008 was shaping up to be a busy year in California government. It’s an election year, for one, and the state faces a multi-billion dollar budget deficit. Meanwhile, there’s a landmark health care reform bill on the table. California’s Democratic Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez talks with Correspondent Marianne Russ.
1/3/2008
Listen

Oregon Gay Couples Cancel Trips to Courthouse
Celebrations turned into vigils last night. An Oregon law that would give same-sex couples many of the rights of married couples has been put on hold. JPR's Jessica Robinson visited a vigil in Ashland attended by couples who originally planned to register as partners this week.
1/3/2008
Listen

Commentary: 'Time Present' by John Fisher-Smith
On this second day of the new year, the poetry of T.S. Eliot inspires these New Year thoughts by commentator John Fisher-Smith. Ashland writer John Fisher-Smith is looking forward to the publication of his memoirs.
1/2/2008
Listen

Ashland Co-op Gets Organic Stamp of Approval
For all the work a farm puts into growing organic food, a grocer can cancel out the label through a little careless co-mingling. Ashland Food Co-op outreach manager Annie Hoy talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson about the role of the retailer in the organic food industry.
1/2/2008
Listen

Journey Out of Poverty Begins in the Kitchen
People who are homeless face a classic Catch 22: without a job, they can’t find a place to live. And without a place to live, it’s hard to find a job. At an innovative program in Seattle, the homeless are taught the basics of food preparation and professional cooking. Sarah Gustavus reports.
1/1/2008
Listen

For One Father, Gang Life Hard to Erase
Gabriel Hinojas spent almost half his life in a Latino gang. After his last stint in prison though, he made a big decision: he was going to be a responsible, law-abiding citizen and father. But as Rob Schmitz of the California Report discovered, turning over a new leaf is easier said than done.
1/1/2008
Listen

It's 2008: What's on Your Mind?
Time to flip those calendars, if you haven’t already, and get used to writing “08” on checks. With the new year here, we asked people around the Northwest what’s on their mind in 2008. Interviews by Chris Lehman, Anna King and Jessica Robinson.
1/1/2008
Listen

Endangered Brews
Champagne may be the traditional drink of New Year’s, but you can be sure beer will make an appearance at many gatherings tonight. Unfortunately for connoisseurs, beer's key ingredients, hops and barley, are getting expensive and hard to find. Guy Hand reports.
12/31/2007
Listen

Humans: 0, Redding's Bald Eagles: 1
Redding’s bald eagles aren't budging. They've thwarted CalTrans' efforts to move the pair from the site of a future construction zone. California Fish and Game scientist Craig Martz gives JPR's Jessica Robinson an update on the stubborn eagles and their nest.
12/31/2007
Listen

Oregon Domestic Partnerships Law Delayed by Court
This Wednesday, as soon as county offices re-opened after the holiday, Oregon was expected to have a rush of gay and lesbian couples registering as domestic partners. But the new law giving these couples most of the rights of married couples has been put on hold ...
12/31/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Frank Lang
On today's Nature Notes, Frank uncovers the Jarusalem beetle, and explains the difference between soil and dirt (don't let him catch you confusing the two!) Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
12/28/2007
Listen

Full Steam Ahead for Geothermal Energy
Electricity is flowing from the first geothermal power plant to go online in the Northwest. The southern Idaho plant is probably the first of many. Geothermal developers say their flavor of alternative energy has become cost-competitive. Correspondent Tom Banse reports.
12/28/2007
Listen

Something Wintry This Way Comes
Roads officials are prepping their snowplows, sanders and de-icers in response to a snow warning issued by the National Weather Service. Meteorologist Sven Nelaimischkies tells JPR's Jessica Robinson what's in store for the region this weekend, and what 2008 will bring.
12/28/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Czech Boys' by Diana Coogle
How much can we really comprehend political and social upheaval in other countries? Diana Coogle suspects she’ll never really know what it’s like. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
12/27/2007
Listen

Nuclear ‘Renaissance’ Takes Root in Idaho
The Northwest is not immune to the renewed interest in nuclear power. Two different companies have come forward with plans for commercial nuclear reactors to serve the region. Both propose to put a nuke plant in rural southwest Idaho. Why there? Tom Banse looks for answers.
12/27/2007
Listen

Plan Calls for New Logging on Old Growth Forests
The federal government is proposing new logging on old growth forests in western Oregon. Some community members are organizing in opposition to the proposal. Others say the timber revenue will help rural counties. Rachael McDonald of KLCC reports.
12/27/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Coffee Spoons' by Madeleine DeAndreis
This is the time of year when we reconnect with friends and family. Many people send cards. The best way commentator Madeleine DeAndreis knows to reconnect is through music. Madeleine DeAndreis is a writer and teacher living in Siskiyou County.
12/26/2007
Listen

California's Poet Laureate Explores the Blues
"Something About the Blues" is the title of a new collection of writing by California's poet laureate Al Young. And what better time to talk about having the blues than post-Christmas wintertime. Young talks with Scott Shafer of the California Report.
12/26/2007
Listen

Once Upon a Christmas ...
On a special holiday edition of the Jefferson Daily we present a collection of stories from JPR listeners and staff members. Some are poignant, others funny. All are stories of the magically unexpected that could only happen at this time of year.
 
Stories on the show:
 
- Two city mice head to the country –- way, out in the country -- to Yosemite National Park for Christmas. Told by Allyn Stone of Ashland.
 
- A family just can’t get into the holiday spirit, until a famous character from fiction saves them. Written by Jennie Englund of Ashland.
 
- A little girl, even though all her friends and all the adults think they know better, isn’t about to be convinced that there’s no Santa, nor that candy canes don’t sprout from the ground. Told by Valerie Ing-Miller of Redding.
 
- You may think there’s a pretty standard way of getting and decorating a Christmas tree, but in our final story, a father and daughter explain the detailed ritual of how it’s done in their family. Told by Scott and Amelia Clay of Medford.
12/24/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Frank Lang
Frank explores mistletoe lore, including why if there are no berries on the mistletoe, there's no kissing. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
12/21/2007
Listen

Tired of Traffic? Europe May Have a Solution
What if the speed limit on the freeway during rush hour was lowered to 45 miles an hour? Believe it or not, drivers might actually get to their destination faster. This is just one out-of-the-box idea traffic engineers and politicians in the Northwest are toying with. Austin Jenkins reports.
12/21/2007
Listen

Saxophone Santa Gets a Reprieve
For the last 10 years, a retired music teacher in Medford has been serenading the neighborhood in front of his house at Christmas. This year, a complaint from next door briefly shut him down. But through a little bit of goodwill and the help of old acquaintances, Santa is performing again. JPR’s Jessica Robinson paid him a visit.
12/21/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Cookie Party' by Diana Coogle
It's the season for parties and for good things to eat. Commentator Diana Coogle has this story about entertaining off the grid at her house in the mountains. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
12/20/2007
Listen

Holiday Play Peeks into Truman Capote's Childhood
Truman Capote was known for his incisive writing and his eccentric public persona. He doesn’t seem like the sort of person who would write children’s stories. JPR's Bob Davy talks with director Bruce Hostetler about play “Holiday Memories” at Oregon Stage Works.
12/20/2007
Listen

EPA Rejects Emissions Rule; Next Stop, Court
The EPA has rejected California’s request to enact the nation’s first regulations on greenhouse gas emissions from cars. The denial late yesterday is being met with a round of legal threats. JPR's Jessica Robinson has more.
12/20/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Gift Exchange' by Paula Bandy
Christmas is a time for parties and gift-giving. Paula Bandy's commentary explores the dynamics of one such gift exchange. Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
12/19/2007
Listen

Kids' Letters to Santa Change with Technology
The letter to Santa is a key element of the Santa myth. And for nearly 20 years, Frank d’Entremont has been one of the people who answers the letter from Ashland kids. D’Entrement explains to JPR's Jessica Robinson the changes he's seen in that time.
12/19/2007
Listen

Link to Clear Cutting Examined in Wake of Mudslide
Investigations are underway into whether clear-cut logging was a factor in two massive mudslides this month in Oregon and Washington. Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
12/19/2007
Listen

Christmas High Season for Picture Books
One of the best places to look for a good book this time of year may be the children’s section. JPR's Jessica Robinson gets the recommendations of Tree House Books owner Muriel Johnson, who says the holidays bring out some of the best in kids' books.
 
Muriel's Picks:
"The Tall Book of Christmas" various authors
"A Creature Was Stirring" (pictured) Clement Clarke Moore & Carter Goodrich
"Great Joy" Kate DiCamillo
"What Cats Want for Christmas" Kandy Radzinski
"Kringle," Tony Abbott
"A Christmas Memory," Truman Capote
12/18/2007
Listen

Uncovering Santa
The economy may be a little soft this holiday season, but for those who own the right outfit, are willing to work weekends and don't mind listening to kids for hours on end, well, business is booming. Scott Shafer of the California Report found out what it takes to be Santa.
12/17/2007
Listen

Oregon Offers Cheap Rx, But Many Don't Know It
The escalating cost of prescription drugs is just part of this country’s health care blues, but virtually every Oregonian is eligible for a little-known prescription discount plan. Jefferson Public Radio's Julia Sommer has more.
12/17/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Frank Lang
Frank Lang explains the connection between the sagebrush of the West and the fravorite drink of turn-of-the-century artists in France. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by JPR.
12/14/2007
Listen

Crews Try to Restore Staple of Western Landscape
The federal government is using tens of millions of your tax dollars to restore a scrubby looking brush to the Western landscape. Inland Northwest biologists say they value expanses of sagebrush just as much as old growth forests. Correspondent Anna King reports.
12/14/2007
Listen

A Visit to Teampall an Ghleanntain
One of the holiday traditions in this region is spending a classic old fashioned Christmas in Ireland, through the stories of Tomaseen Foley. Foley talks with JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy about this year’s “A Celtic Christmas” in Medford.
12/14/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Sympathy' by Diana Coogle
Diana Coogle says one of the benefits of studying literature is that it gives her a different framework from which to see experiences. Lately, she's been studying the concept of "moral evolution." Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
12/13/2007
Listen

It's Not the Holidays Until the Chorus Sings ...
The holiday season is choral music’s time to shine. And when it comes to holiday tunes, the more the merrier. The 42-voice Southern Oregon Repertory Singers performs this Friday and Sunday. Director Paul French talks with JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy.
12/13/2007
Listen

Efforts Reduce Labs, But Meth Use Persists
It’s rare to hear the drug meth mentioned without the word “epidemic” following it up. In the last several years, law enforcement, public health officials, social services and the media helped draw public awareness to a problem they said was destroying communities. But has the effort worked? As JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports, the answer to that question is mixed.
12/13/2007
Listen

Too Many Clothes, Not Enough Shovels
A week after major flooding hit the Northwest, donated goods are flowing into hard hit areas. In some cases by the semi-truck load. But what people are donating is not necessarily what flood victims need. Correspondent Austin Jenkins reports.
12/12/2007
Listen

Joseph, Oregon: From Beams to Bronze
You’d think the number of people in a town would plummet when a town loses three sawmills. That hasn’t happened in Joseph, Ore. But who they are has changed drastically. Joseph is now home to rich retirees and bronze artisans. Correspondent Anna King has more.
12/12/2007
Listen

Timber Town's New Industry ... Water?
New jobs are generally considered good for the economy. But opponents of a water bottling plant Nestle is proposing in McCloud, Calif., counter the plant and its consumption of spring water would in fact hurt the town's economic comeback. Jessica Robinson has more.
12/12/2007
Listen

'Christmas Carol' Production a Family Affair
A group of families has come together in Grants Pass to once again tell the classic yuletide story, "A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens. To find out why this play has such appeal year after year, JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy stopped backstage at the Barnstormers Theatre.
12/11/2007
Listen

Rogue Valley Ready for its Close-Up
Last month, movie cameras started rolling in the Medford-Ashland area on a baseball film called "Calvin Marshall." Producers Anne Lundgren and Mike Matondi talked with Geoffrey Riley on JPR’s Jefferson Exchange about the daily challenges of moviemaking, and their choice of location.
12/11/2007
Listen

Christmas Tree Permits Offer Wild Alternative
Some people still like a little forest with their tree. A federal program during the holidays allows families to get their Christmas tree from public forest land. These “wild” trees may not have the perfection of a farm-grown or artificial tree, but as JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports, some people are willing to give up perfection for a little tradition.
12/11/2007
Listen

Academy Brings Local Dancers to New Heights
Le Cirque Centre, a new aerial dance academy in Ashland, attracts beginning students, accomplished gymnasts, and versatile dancers from throughout Southern Oregon. JPR's Michael Altman attended a practice session and spoke to some of the dancers when they caught a breath between acrobatic feats.
12/10/2007
Listen

Researchers Ask Why Barn Owls Turn Up as Road Kill
As winter descends on the West, so does an ornithological mystery. People seldom see barn owls on the wing, but these ghostly white raptors die in large numbers on the highways every winter. Guy Hand joins researchers scanning the roads in Idaho.
12/10/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Tai Chi' by Diana Coogle
Diana Coogle has been taking Tai Chi classes this fall. In this commentary, she talks about the discipline it's taught her. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
12/6/2007
Listen

Residential Smoking Bans Catching On
Smoking is banned in most public places. Now apartment owners are taking those restrictions even further. That means if you live in one of a growing number of apartment complexes around the region, you can’t smoke at home. Correspondent Chris Lehman has more.
12/6/2007
Listen

Secessionist Sentiment Lingers in 'Jefferson'
Sixty-six years ago, Japan's Navy attacked Pearl Harbor, marking the beginning of U.S. involvement in World War II, and the end of a movement in Southern Oregon and Northern California to create the state of Jefferson. What’s happened to the idea since then? And what would it take to create a 51st state? JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports.
12/6/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Platitudes' by Madeleine DeAndreis
The holiday season calls for parties, potlucks, and probably lots of small talk. Madeleine DeAndreis knows what that means -- one of her biggest conversational pet peeves will rear its ugly head. Madeleine DeAndreis is a writer and teacher in Siskiyou County.
12/5/2007
Listen

Spinning Comedy Out of Thin Air
Standing in front of a crowd, not knowing what you're going to say sounds pretty scary to most of us. Improv comedians Eve Smyth and Kyndra Laughery of The Hamazons tell JPR's Bob Binnewies why they're looking forward to that exact situation this week.
12/5/2007
Listen

Coastal Areas Slog Through Storm Aftermath
Communities all along the coast are in clean-up mode after a pair of devastating wind and rain storms struck the Northwest this week. The governors of both Oregon and Washington plan to request federal help to fix the widespread damage. Chris Lehman has this report.
12/5/2007
Listen

Made-for-TV Opera Hits Shasta Stage
When you think of winter holiday classics for the small screen, there are a number of obvious favorites: "Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer," "It’s a Wonderful Life," "Frosty the Snowman." But "Amahl and the Night Visitors"? JPR’s Valerie Ing-Miller talks with Elizabeth Waterbury, director of a production of the 1951 opera at Shasta College in Redding.
12/4/2007
Listen

History Groups Turn to Voters for Lifeline
The same forces that closed Jackson County's public libraries are now threatening the existence of the Southern Oregon Historical Society and 14 other preservation groups. JPR’s Julia Sommer has this story.
12/4/2007
Listen

The Holiday Season: Choral Music's Time to Shine
The Rogue Valley Chorale will offer its annual Christmas program Dec. 8 and 9 at the Craterian Ginger Rogers Theatre in Medford. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talks with director Lynn Sjolund.
12/3/2007
Listen

Kozinski Takes Chief Seat of Controversial Ninth
You might recognize him from some of the country’s most hotly debated court rulings ... or, possibly, from "The Dating Game." Alex Kozinski, the new chief judge of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, talks with the California Report's Scott Shafer.
12/3/2007
Listen

Abundance Swap Takes Aim at Needless Purchasing
After Thanksgiving, on what’s known as Black Friday, Americans head to stores to purchase billions of dollars worth of stuff. The following Monday, Cyber Monday, we make a bee line for the computer to purchase ... more stuff. Some people are looking for alternatives to this holiday tradition. JPR's Michael Altman reports from Ashland's “abundance swap."
12/3/2007
Listen

Former Congressman AuCoin Endorses Novick
Steve Novick has picked up an endorsement from former Oregon Congressman and Southern Oregon University lecturer Les AuCoin. It’s the biggest endorsement of Novick’s underdog Senate campaign so far. JPR's Jessica Robinson has more.
12/3/2007
Listen

Pacific Storm Pummels Northwest
The powerful storm battering the Northwest has taken out power and closed dozens of roads up and down the coast. Wind speeds over 100 miles an hour have been reported. And the National Weather Service has issued a flood watch for the south coast ...
12/3/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Hard Drive Crash' by Diana Coogle
Most of us have prepared for various kinds of emergencies -- we have first aid kits and fire extinguishers and spare flashlights. But Diana Coogle wonders how many of us are prepared for a computer emergency.
11/29/2007
Listen

A Weighty Endeavour
Public collage artists Marvin and Lilli Ann Rosenberg are making their mark in stone. Their first big public mosaic celebrated America’s oldest subway. It’s at the Park Street Station in Boston. JPR’s Michael Altman visited the artists at their Applegate studio, outside of Jacksonville. 
11/29/2007
Listen

Immune Trees May Bring Back the Port Orford Cedar
The survival of the Port Orford Cedar has been precarious since an exotic fungus nearly wiped out the beautiful tree near the Southern Oregon and Northern California coast. Now, researchers have found a way to restore wild Port Orford stands. JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports.
11/29/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Haze' by Paula Bandy
Fall is a time of colder weather and falling leaves. And for commentator Paula Bandy, the smell of burning leaves brings back childhood memories. Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
11/28/2007
Listen

Caltrans Boots Bald Eagles From Construction Area
As their numbers rise, bald eagles are showing up closer to cities. But the California Department of Transportation worries a pair in Redding plans to nest too close to a construction zone. Environmental scientist Craig Martz talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson about the effort to move the birds, and the new digs Caltrans has set up for them.
11/28/2007
Listen

Music to Taxpayers' Ears: Kickers Being Printed
When the state of Oregon takes in more money than it expected, taxpayers get a refund called a "kicker." Oregonians will soon get their first one in six years. Chris Lehman got a behind-the-scenes look at what it takes to get more than a million checks in the mail.
11/28/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Face Value' by Judy Ticehurst
She knows she's not supposed to, but sometimes commentator Judy Ticehurst can't help but think about outward appearances. Today, she muses on the amount of make up she wears, and how little she knows about what's actually in it. Judy Ticehurst is a writer living in Medford.
11/27/2007
Listen

Pass Me a Merlot Lite?
Have you ever wondered how many calories you’re swirling in that glass of holiday wine? Well, the federal government is proposing a new rule that would make wineries put more information on the side of the bottle. Correspondent Anna King reports.
11/27/2007
Listen

TV Series Offers a Primer for Green Home Newbies
Have you ever wondered what it's like to live in a straw bale or solar powered home? A series premiering tonight peeks inside some of the Rogue Valley’s green built homes. "Oregon Green Homes" producers Kim Lewis and Don McCoy talk with JPR's Jessica Robinson.
11/27/2007
Listen

Drug Treatment Experiment Runs into Trouble
A year ago, we brought you a story about Prometa. It was hailed as the long-sought “miracle cure” for addiction to methamphetamine and cocaine. Now, elected officials in a Washington county have halted funding for the experimental drug treatment therapy. And a pilot program in Idaho has also been indefinitely postponed. Correspondent Austin Jenkins reports.
11/26/2007
Listen

Discovery of Medfly Halts Farmer's Business
The battle against the medfly is being waged once again in the Golden State. Farmers in Northern California are grappling with the startling discovery of Mediterranean fruit flies this fall. Jenny O’Mara visited an organic grower who’s been hit hard by a quarantine.
11/26/2007
Listen

Tech Companies' Overseas Responsibility Questioned
The most prominent names in U.S. technology are sending their assembly work overseas, just as American apparel companies have done for years. And just as popular clothing labels have faced criticism for labor abuses overseas, electronics manufacturers are taking their turn under the microscope. Oahn Ha of the California Report has more.
11/26/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Frank Lang
Frank tracks a surprisingly clever bird, and one that was likely on your plate yesterday: the turkey. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
11/23/2007
Listen

Food Pantries Turn to Public to Fill Federal Gaps
More families in the region are making a trip to the local food pantry -- that's what Medford non-profit ACCESS, Inc., is finding. Vicki Penny and Philip Yates of ACCESS talk with JPR's Jessica Robinson about what may have changed for these families and why Congressional inaction is making it harder for ACCESS to serve them.
11/23/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Harvest Time' by John Fisher-Smith
John Fisher-Smith's list of things to be thankful for this Thanksgiving includes a gardener from his childhood. Ashland writer John Fisher-Smith is looking forward to publication of his memoirs.
11/21/2007
Listen

Center Hopes to Fill Natural History Niche
Medford is situated in what's considered one of the most ecologically diverse places on earth, but it doesn't have a natural history museum. The Jefferson Nature Center hopes to change that. Executive director Susan Cross sat down to talk with JPR's Bob Binnewies.
11/21/2007
Listen

Panhandling Crackdown Raises Free Speech Concerns
Asking for money from strangers is never easy. In Medford and Roseburg, it will soon be even tougher. That’s because leaders there are trying to put an end to panhandling along the side of the road. Correspondent Chris Lehman has more.
11/21/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'The Clock' by Judy Ticehurst
Old memories run rampant around the holidays. And not all of it’s nostalgia. Today, commentator Judy Ticehurst looks for an antidote to nagging regrets. Judy Ticehurst is a writer living in Medford.
11/20/2007
Listen

Lessons From the Lingering Oil
Nearly two weeks after a cargo ship slammed into the Bay Bridge, spilling 58,000 gallons of oil into San Francisco Bay, there are a lot of questions about the accident and the response to it. It will likely be months before clean-up crews complete their work. And as Amy Standen of the California Report finds, even then, most of the oil is likely to remain in the water.
11/20/2007
Listen

With Wood as Their Canvas ...
A region known for its trees has inspired a community of woodcrafters. This weekend, carvers and furniture makers in Southern Oregon will gather in Ashland at the annual show of the Siskiyou Woodcrafters Guild. JPR's Michael Altman visited one artist on the job.
11/20/2007
Listen

John Garamendi Sifts Through the Debris
California Lieutenant Governor John Garamendi is wrapping up his first year in the number two spot in state government. He’s spoken out about executive pay in the UC and CSU systems, and recently headed the effort to clean up debris in the wake of the Southern California fires. Garamendi talks with Sacramento correspondent Jenny O’Mara.
11/19/2007
Listen

Canadian Cattle Over 30 Months Roll into U.S.
Starting today live cattle of any age can be brought across the border. That marks a return to the way things were before an imported Canadian Holstein was found to have mad cow disease in Washington state four years ago. Some Northwest ranchers say they’re still worried about the health of the Canadian animals. Anna King reports.
11/19/2007
Listen

Wineries Offer Sneak Preview of Wines-to-Come
This weekend, several local wineries uncorked their barrels and invited the public for a taste. JPR’s Michael Altman took a Sunday drive along Southern Oregon’s Applegate Valley Wine Route and has this story.
11/19/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Frank Lang
Frank explores early mammals, and the in-fighting between the Victorian naturalists who studied them. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
11/16/2007
Listen

Listener Letters: Who defeated Measure 50?
Tobacco companies spent $12 million dollars on the campaign to defeat Oregon's Measure 50. But some listeners say it's insulting to Oregon voters to say that's the reason it failed. We read from your letters.
11/16/2007
Listen

North State 'Resurrects' Mahler's 2nd
When the North State Symphony performs Mahler’s Symphony No. 2 this weekend in Redding, the event will be necessitate so many musicians and singers, that they won’t all fit on stage. Conductor Kyle Wiley-Pickett tells JPR's Valerie Ing-Miller about the monumental effort.
11/16/2007
Listen

Dumping in a Forest Near You
Oregon forests have become dumping grounds for everything from old mattresses and home appliances to shotgun shells and cars. Now, four Grants Pass citizens have formed the Clean Forest Project to address this noxious problem. JPR’s Julia Sommer has more.
11/16/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Yachats Lecture' by Diana Coogle
Technology is a wonderful thing. But things weren't always so bad before our technological changes, as Diana Coogle learned recently, trying to give a lecture without Power Point. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
11/15/2007
Listen

Direct Action: The Anatomy of a War Protest
In Olympia, Wash., anti-war activists are trying to take things to the next level. Demonstrators have chosen a tactic called “Direct Action.” Unlike a planned march through the streets, they’re blocking streets to stop military shipments out of the Port of Olympia. Correspondent Austin Jenkins reports.
11/15/2007
Listen

Ashland Musicians Honor Folk Great Pete Seeger
Pete Seeger helped set the template for American folk music. This Saturday, Ashland musicians Dave and Tami Marsten are performing a tribute to Pete Seeger with their daughters. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy dropped in on the family in rehearsal.
11/15/2007
Listen

Sell it Somewhere Else
Redding is finding that freedom of speech doesn’t always beautify the neighborhood. Rogue used car lots are cropping up across town. An ordinance blocking the placement of vehicles for sale along the road has been deemed unconstitutional. JPR’s Jessica Robinson has more.
11/15/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Fake Book' by Madeleine DeAndreis
Commentator Madeleine DeAndreis makes it a point to sing during the holiday season. Often, she’s armed with her favorite songbook that’s a one-of-a-kind. Madeleine DeAndreis is a writer, teacher and frequent singer living in Siskiyou County.
11/14/2007
Listen

Better Teachers Key to Closing Achievement Gap
Teachers, administrators and parents are in Sacramento for a two-day “Achievement Gap Summit.” Black and Latino students in California lag behind whites and Asians, and no one knows exactly why. Julie Small reports some of the ideas focus more on teachers than on students.
11/14/2007
Listen

Toxins in Senator Makes Him Consider Safeguards
Oregon state senator Alan Bates is a physician and a health-conscious Ashlander, so he wasn’t expecting high levels of mercury to turn up in is body. Bates talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson about the toxins the Oregon Environmental Council found in him as part a new report.
11/14/2007
Listen

SOU Tackles Stoppard's Richly Written 'Arcadia'
It depends on who you talk to of course, but for some, Tom Stoppard is among the best playwrights of the 20th century. “Arcadia” is currently being performed by the Southern Oregon University theater arts department. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talks with director Dennis Smith.
11/13/2007
Listen

Water Plan Expected to be Political Firestorm
California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger will release his plan for the state’s ailing water supply system by the end of the year. As Amy Standen of the California Report explains, voters can expect one of the most politically explosive water proposals the state has ever seen.
11/13/2007
Listen

Klamath Dam Opponents Appeal to Ratepayers
Tribes, fishermen and others who want seven dams removed from the Klamath River are going to the people who pay the bills. The groups are enlisting the support of the dam owner's customers. Regina Chichizola of Klamath Riverkeeper talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson.
11/13/2007
Listen

Eco-Therapy for War Vets
Individual states are stepping up to provide more help to returning soldiers and sailors. A novel program in Washington State is using nature to heal the wounds of war. Correspondent Tom Banse has more from suburban Seattle.
11/12/2007
Listen

Voices from the Picket Lines
Hollywood honchos will again face hundreds of striking writers this week. Members of the Writer's Guild of America and their supporters plan to be out in force in front of film and television studios. Lenora Chu of the California Report takes us to the picket line.
11/12/2007

Early Women Behind the Lense
These days it’s easy to snap a picture and share it with the world. But in the early days of photography, taking a picture was a big commitment ... especially if you were female. Women lugging around cameras in the late 1800s were sure to raise eyebrows, if not censure. Historian Suzanne Warner talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson about her research into a Klamath Falls photographer.
11/12/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Frank Lang
One of the most primitive frogs is our tailed frog. Although, as Frank explains, "tailed" is really a misnomer. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
11/9/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Waves and Leaves' by Diana Coogle
Science gives us a lot of explanations about the world we live in and how it works, but Diana Coogle finds those explanations sometimes inadequate. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
11/8/2007
Listen

Coos Bay: Little City, Big Port
The southern coast of Oregon is one of the most isolated parts of the state. But leaders in Coos Bay want to turn the seclusion to their advantage. Correspondent Chris Lehman reports on the little city with plans for a big port.
11/8/2007
Listen

'Little Shop of Horrors' at Ashland High
The melodramatic musical spoof "Little Shop of Horrors" will be performed by Ashland High School. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy has a preview.
11/8/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Men with Big Fish' by Paula Bandy
We all have things we say and do to try to impress people. But commentator Paula Bandy was surprised by the approach taken by some single men in the world of online dating. Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
11/7/2007
Listen

Palouse Earthworm
The Plouse Earthworm is rarely seen, but environmental groups are urging it be studied and protected under the Endangered Species Act.
11/7/2007
Listen

RVTD Open House
The Rogue Valley Transportation District, better known as RVTD, is holding a series of open houses to present its draft Long Range Plan to the Public.  Jefferson Public Radio's Julia sommer has the story.
11/7/2007
Listen

Job Fair Links Returning Soldiers with Employers
One of the hardest adjustments for returning soldiers can be moving from the battlefield to the workplace. Military officials and business leaders in Oregon held a job fair for returning soldiers over the weekend. Chris Lehman reports.
11/5/2007
Listen

Southern Oregon Food and Wine Classic
JPR's Michael Altman visited the Ashland Armory this weekend to witness the sights, sounds, and tastes of a new event sure to attract attention for years to come
11/5/2007
Listen

Mayors on Global Warming
Forty six Northwest cities have signed a pledge to cut their global warming pollution below 1990 levels.  Mayors from the Northwest and across the country continued to meet in Seattle today to swap tips on reaching that goal. 
11/2/2007
Listen

Rogue Valley Symphony Anniversary Concert
The Rogue Valley Symphony celebrates its 40th anniversary with three performances of Aaron Copeland's "Lincoln Portrait." JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy has this story.
11/2/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Frank Lang
As cold season approaches, Frank Lang discusses one sure fire way to keep the germs at bay. Wash your hands! Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
11/2/2007
Listen

Jefferson Classical Guitar Society Concert
The Jefferson Classical guitar Society is an organization dedicated to promoting the classical guitar in the State of Jefferson.  This weekend the society will present the first of its series of concerts.  JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy spoke with Roma Sprung, president of the society, and this weekend's featured performer, Jose Luis Merlin.
11/1/2007

Commentary: 'Forests in the Red' by Diana Coogle
Catastrophic environmental change seems to be so apocalyptic that it remains in the realm of the imagined. But Diana Coogle witnessed such change when she was hiking in the Rocky Mountains recently. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
11/1/2007
Listen

When the Levee Breaks ... On Purpose
Water is spilling onto farmland next to Upper Klamath Lake in Southern Oregon. That’s because nearly two miles of levees were destroyed in a series of explosions Tuesday morning. But it’s no accident. Correspondent Chris Lehman explains.
10/31/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'All Saints' by Madeleine DeAndreis
Many of tonight's trick-or-treaters have spent weeks planning their costumes. Today, Madeleine DeAndreis remembers her best costume, though it was under-appreciated at the time. Madeleine DeAndreis is a writer and teacher living in Siskiyou County.
10/31/2007
Listen

Home Insurance Payout
An investigative story in last month's edition of Bloomberg Markets magazine revealed how home insurers may be motivated to reduce payouts to owners. Scott Shafer of the California Report spoke with Darrell Preston, co-author of the article.
10/30/2007
Listen

Costs of the Southern California Fires
The costs of the southern California fires are many, from lost lives to destroyed homes and an economy interrupted. Now, state financial analysts are adding up the costs of fighting these fires.  Sacramento Bureau Chief John Myers reported on the bills that have piled up.
10/29/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank reflects on recent dinosaur news: a new giant was found in Patagonia. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
10/26/2007
Listen

Death with Dignity Law Turns 10
Ten years ago this week, Oregon became the first state in the nation to legalize physician assisted suicide. To this day, Oregon remains the only state with such a law. But as OPB's Colin Fogarty reports, the Death with Dignity Act is as solidly in place as ever.
10/26/2007
Listen

Company Sends 'Flying Swiss Army Knives' to SoCal
The firefighting effort in Southern California has drawn on resources from all around the country -- including some in Southern Oregon. JPR’s Michael Altman visited Erickson Air-Crane's headquarters to find out more about their role in emergency response.
10/26/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Animals and People' by Diana Coogle
Thirty-five years of life in the woods has made commentator Diana Coogle especially conscious of the way we treat animals. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
10/25/2007
Listen

Vet Shortage Means Some Livestock Lack Care
Imagine living in a place with no doctors. That’s the reality for animals that live in rural counties where there are no veterinarians. In fact, there is a shortage of large animal vets across the nation. Experts say the shortage is projected to grow. Anna King reports.
10/25/2007
Listen

Saxophone Group Gets the Chinese Take on the Sax
The saxophone has traditionally been a staple of American swing and jazz music. But musicians in other parts of the world are putting their own twist on the sax. Southern Oregon University’s saxophone orchestra recently went on a tour of China, where they joined Chinese saxophonists for concerts of American and Asian music. Now the group is back and will reprise the music they played in China at a concert tomorrow night. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talks with SOU music professor Rhett Bender.
10/25/2007
Listen

Inside the Nerve Center of Firefighting Efforts
While fires rage in Southern California, the nerve center of the emergency response is actually in Northern California, just a few miles from the state capital. Jenny O’Mara has more on how limited resources are being moved throughout the state. 
10/25/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Ephemeral World' by John Fisher-Smith
How does one deal with the accumulation of correspondence that fills our everyday lives? John Fisher-Smith considers the ephemeral nature of letters -- both paper and electronic. Ashland writer John Fisher-Smith is looking forward to publication of a book called "Opening My Eyes."
10/24/2007
Listen

Jackson County Residents Check Out Books Again
Today for the first time in more than six months, Jackson County residents can go to the public library. All 15 library branches closed in April when money from a federal timber subsidy ran out. To get the system up and running again, Jackson County made a controversial decision: they hired a private company to operate the libraries. Jessica Robinson reports.
10/24/2007
Listen

Medford, Ashland Libraries to Re-Open
Ashland and Medford’s public libraries will re-open at 10 a.m. tomorrow after more than a six-month closure. The rest of Jackson County’s libraries will re-open next week. Jackson County’s library system is now under the management of Library Systems and Services, a private company based in Maryland.  Jefferson Public Radio’s Julia Sommer has more.
10/23/2007
Listen

The U.N.'s Role in Today's 'Small World'
It was 62 years ago tomorrow that representatives of 50 nations gathered in San Francisco to sign the United Nations Charter. Later tonight, Ramu Damodaran, chief of the UN’s Civil Society Service, will speak at Southern Oregon University. He talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson.
10/23/2007
Listen

The Latino Community's Business Community
The "immigrant worker" has become a familiar image. But not all immigrants go to work for other people. Some start their own businesses. Rene Quintana founded the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce in Crescent City to support the growing coastal Latino population. He talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson.
10/22/2007
Listen

Oregon's Constitution ... Not Quite Sacred
Cigarettes are often viewed as an easy target for tax-hungry governments. But a proposed hike in Oregons' tobacco tax this November is giving some people second thoughts. The tax would end up in the state’s constitution. Chris Lehman has more.
10/22/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank takes a minute to notice one of the most evolutionarily advanced creatures of the intertidal zone: sea squirts. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
10/19/2007
Listen

Novick Calls Smith a 'Nice Man' with Bad Policies
Democrats say Oregon’s two-term Republican senator is vulnerable. This May, one of the names Democratic Party voters can expect to see on their primary ballots is Portland lawyer Steve Novick’s. JPR's Jessica Robinson caught up with him earlier today en route to Roseburg.
10/19/2007
Listen

Historians Pinpoint Klamath Falls' Forgotten Falls
If you've ever wondered, "Where are Klamath Falls' falls?" you're not alone. Many residents don't know they still exist. JPR's Jessica Robinson reports on the county museum's effort to restore local knowledge of the town's namesake.
10/18/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'To Market, To Market' Judy Ticehurst
Medford commentator Judy Ticehurst is very particular about her groceries, and hopes the fledgling co-op will still get off the ground. Even while on vacation, Judy's been wondering about the fate of this home-grown market. She sends us this commentary from the road.
10/18/2007
Listen

Clock Ticks Down on Medford Co-op
Medford’s first cooperative food store has been in the works for two years. Now it’s make-or-break time for the endeavor, which must raise close to a million dollars by Oct. 31 to stay afloat. JPR's Julia Sommer has more.
10/18/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Pete Carroll' by Madeleine DeAndreis
These days, the police are rarely mentioned in a positive light. But commentator Madeleine DeAndreis takes s different view of cops, because of an officer she never met -- her grandfather. Madeleine DeAndreis is a writer and teacher living in Siskiyou County.
10/17/2007
Listen

'And if only the place could talk ...'
A farmstead near Roseburg built around the time the Oregon Territory was becoming the State of Oregon is up for the National Register of Historic Places. It was owned by Mildred Kanipe, something of an eccentric, who barely updated the house. Historian Lois Eagleton talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson about the house and its inhabitant.
10/17/2007
Listen

Oregon Brings Home Poor Grades on Kids' Wellbeing
Children First for Oregon released its report card on kids today. Oregon earned a D average. That's based on Oregon’s progress on its own benchmarks. The advocacy group's executive director, Robin Christian tells JPR's Jessica Robinson why they're feeling optimistic anyway.
10/16/2007
Listen

'07 Vintage in the Making
The Willamette Valley isn’t the only game in town any more. Southern Oregon’s Mediterranean climate has nurtured a thriving wine industry. Right now, local wineries are wrapping up their harvest for the year ... which means it’s fermenting time. JPR’s Michael Altman reports.
10/16/2007
Listen

Vigils Draw Attention to Health Care Vote
Congress will vote later this week on whether to override President Bush’s veto of a children’s health insurance plan. Activists will hold vigils tonight to try to pressure some lawmakers to change their mind and vote in favor of the bill. Chris Lehman reports on local efforts.
10/16/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Revolutionary Art' by Diana Coogle
New art is sometimes considered too radical and sometimes it's greatly acclaimed. Diana Coogle muses on the different ways audiences react to performances of their time. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
10/11/2007
Listen

Jubilee Brings Jazz to Kids and Long-Time Fans
The 19th annual Medford Jazz Jubilee takes off tomorrow with a mix of 16 bands from around the country. Performances include visits to more than 15,000 students at Rogue Valley schools. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talks with the festival's Dennis Ramsden.
10/11/2007
Listen

Redefining Gender
Gay rights advocates say the concept of transgender is still widely misunderstood. This week Southern Oregon University is hosting the Rogue Valley’s first transgender education series. Organizers Leslie Stone and Janelle Wilson talk with JPR's Jessica Robinson.
10/11/2007
Listen

Public Gets a Look into Privately Run Libraries
Library Systems and Services, the company hired to operate Jackson County’s libraries, met with the public today. It was the first time the central library in Medford opened its doors since the unprecedented closure of the entire system in April. JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports.
10/11/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Bugged' by Paula Bandy
Paula Bandy is quite fond of bats, but not of another flying creature: the mosquito. Fortunately, she discovered that the one can attract the other. Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
10/10/2007
Listen

Technology Opens Window into Secret Life of Bats
Ask a biologist what’s the least understood of all mammals and chances are the answer will be bats. Only one of the Northwest's native bats has a call audible to the human ear. High tech gizmos are shining more light on the secret life of the region’s bats. Tom Banse reports.
10/10/2007
Listen

Plight of the Bumblebee
Franklin’s bumblebee is found in only one place -- the Southern Oregon and Northern California region. And the bee has disappeared. UC-Davis entomologist Robbin Thorp sounded the alarm on its absence. He tells JPR's Jessica Robinson other bees are following.
10/10/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank marvels at ant society ... even if that society does turn up in places we don't want it. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
10/5/2007
Listen

SOU Stabilizes After Tumultuous Year of Cuts
Last year, facing a financial crisis, Southern Oregon University made $4 million worth of cuts. This fall, administrators say the worst is over. The state gave state universities a welcome boost in funding, and SOU officials say enrollment is looking up. JPR's Jessica Robinson reports.
10/5/2007
Listen

Life Off the Grid
Between the rising cost of energy and the harmful effects of burning fossil fuels, a homemade approach to power is looking a lot better. Jerry Sweetman is part of an upcoming solar home tour in Klamath Falls. He gives JPR's Jessica Robinson a view into off-the-grid living.
10/5/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Quals' by Diana Coogle
Diana Coogle is back in class in Eugene for her second year in graduate school. Fall term began with dreaded examinations known as "The Quals." Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
10/4/2007
Listen

Westlund Sets Sights on Treasurer's Office
When’s the last time you got really excited about the race for state treasurer? Chances are, never. But people who run for treasurer still have to spend months on the campaign trail. Oregon state Senator Ben Westlund started down that road Wednesday. Chris Lehman reports.
10/4/2007
Listen

Acoustic Tags Chart Salmon Travel Habits in Bay
We know that young salmon journey out to the wide ocean. But what’s their itinerary like? Where do they make stops? A recent study in Humboldt Bay using new tagging technology found that before entering the Pacific, coho salmon have a significant layover. U.S. Fish and Wildlife biologist Bill Pinnix talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson.
10/4/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'The Other Woman' by John Fisher-Smith
John Fisher-Smith has a passion for gardening that few people could boast ... and that includes his wife. Ashland writer John Fisher-Smith is looking forward to publication of a book called "Opening My Eyes."
10/3/2007
Listen

Play Probes Symphony Conductor's Moral Standing
Ashland Community Theater's new production,“Taking Sides” by Ronald Harwood, focuses on the conductor of the Berlin Philharmonic under the Nazi regime. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talks with director Jeannine Grizzard about the questions the play poses about right and wrong.
10/3/2007
Listen

The Murals of San Quentin
California’s rich history has been depicted in murals up and down the state. But there’s one major work you’ll probably never see. It’s hidden away inside the walls of San Quentin state prison. The giant sepia tone scenes are the work of an inmate who’s identity was forgotten for nearly 50 years. Now, Nancy Mullane of the California Report brings us the inside story, from the inside.
10/3/2007
Listen

Guardians in the 'Graveyard of the Pacific'
The Columbia River surges into the Pacific at a long and narrow passage known as the Bar. The sea floor below is littered with the debris of thousands of ships. Elizabeth Wynne Johnson introduces us to an elite team of master seamen who bear the high-stakes responsibility of guiding ships through.
10/2/2007
Listen

Scientists, Reps Call Owl Plan a Big Step Backward
A federal recovery plan for the Northern spotted owl is facing opposition from scientists and members of Congress. They say the plan will in fact hinder the endangered bird's recovery. JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports on accusations that political concerns trumped science.
10/2/2007
Listen

One Mural, 300 Imaginations
A mural unveiled in Mount Shasta puts into pictures the community’s collective answer to this question: “What is your vision of peace?” Organizer Donna Bringenberg tells JPR's Jessica Robinson about the creative process when more than 300 people are involved.
10/1/2007
Listen

Program Creates Hemisphere-Wide Biologist Exchange
So far, 17 foreign biologists have come to the Klamath Bird Observatory in Southern Oregon to participate in "Partners in Flight." JPR's Bob Binnewies meets Chris Samuels of Jamaica and Mauricio Ugarte of Peru, along with KBO executive director John Alexander.
10/1/2007
Listen

Legislative 'Angel of Death' Delivers Vetoes
No one wants to be the bearer of bad news — but it’s that time of year at in Sacramento. Governor Schwarzenegger has a few more weeks to sign or veto legislation. And one way or another, lawmakers must be told. Jenny O’Mara reports.
10/1/2007
Listen

President of OIT Dies
Oregon Institute of Technology president Martha Anne Dow lost her battle with breast cancer at age 68 this weekend. On the Klamath Falls campus today she's remembered as an approachable president who foresaw technological needs and pushed the university to meet them ...
10/1/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Rawah Wilderness' by Diana Coogle
Backpacking is one of commentator Diana Coogle's favorite activities. But she sometimes needs to remind herself that backpacking is not a competitive sport. Author Diana Coogle spends part of every week at the University of Oregon studying for a Ph.D. in English.
9/27/2007
Listen

Groups Seek Added Protection for Ancient Turtle
Environmentalists say a Pacific sea turtle that’s survived for millions of years may not be able to survive our fishing industry. A coalition wants to protect its favorite feeding grounds on the Oregon and California coastline. Karen Steele of the Turtle Island Restoration Network talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson.
9/27/2007
Listen

Where Crimes are a Little More ... 'Interesting'
A local robbery usually isn’t of much interest to television stations in the next state ... unless the suspect was wielding a samurai sword. Klamath County, Ore., has had a run of strange, headline-grabbing crimes. And some people feel it's giving the wrong impression about their rural community. JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports.
9/27/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Public Schools' Madeleine DeAndreis
It’s a common question: What do you do for a living? But in commentator Madeleine DeAndreis’ case, the answer often prompts further discussion. Madeleine DeAndreis is a mother, writer and teacher living in Siskiyou County.
9/26/2007
Listen

One Square Inch of Quiet
The quietest square inch in the continental United States is –- drumroll please -– at a rock placed on a moss-covered log in Olympic National Park. An Olympic Peninsula man identified the spot as part of his quest to preserve solitude in the national parks. Tom Banse reports.
9/26/2007
Listen

LaMalfa Worries North State Could Get Squeezed
California water officials say the state is facing a crisis. Republican Assemblyman Doug LaMalfa has had an eye on water for years. He tells JPR’s Bruce Ross the Northern reaches of the state are in better shape than elsewhere, and that could be a problem.
9/26/2007
Listen

'Odd Couple' Finds Actress in New Role
When Jonessa Brittan decided to try directing a play, she jumped right into the deep end. The Redding actress signed for more than 20 performances of Neil Simon’s gender-twisted version of "The Odd Couple." Brittan tells JPR’s Valerie Ing-Miller about the experience.
9/25/2007
Listen

Matsutakes Bring Pickers Who Mean Business
Some hunters in the region don’t need ammo or camouflage, they just need a big bucket. Their target? Mushrooms, and right now it’s open season. Rick Bond of the Fremont-Winema National Forest tells JPR's Jessica Robinson about the small industry that springs every fall.
9/25/2007
Listen

OSF Looks to American History for New Plays
Inspired by the Bard's history plays, the United States History Cycle at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival will produce as many as 50 new plays in the next 12 years. Alison Carey just arrived in Ashland to start work as the director of the cycle. She sat down with JPR's Bob Davy.
9/24/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Humans and rats go way back. Frank gives a brief history of our reluctant relationship with these mammals. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
9/21/2007
Listen

100 Milliwatts of Community Spirit
In this day and age anyone can start a podcast or a blog for free and communicate with the world. But one man in rural Oregon doesn’t think a bigger audience is better. Correspondent Chris Lehman brings us the story of a broadcaster who’s all about keeping it small.
9/21/2007
Listen

Lush Forest, Big Fish Enclosed in Wilderness Bill
Congress is considering wilderness protection for nearly 14,000 arcres on Oregon's south coast. Forester Jerry Becker, who has a cabin along Elk River near Port Orford, describes the area to JPR's Jessica Robinson, and explains why he thinks it should be protected.
9/21/2007
Listen

Alternatives to Alternative Fuels Explored
Growing canola to make biodiesel isn't exactly setting Northwest farmers' hearts aflutter. Plant breeders and university researchers keep plugging away to find more options for growers. Correspondent Tom Banse reports on what we might call alternative alternative fuel crops.
9/20/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Dad, Diving Champion' by Diana Coogle
It only takes a careless word or two to rub someone the wrong way. Commentator Diana Coogle explores how easily that offense might be avoided ... and how difficult avoiding it often is. Author Diana Coogle is studying a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
9/20/2007
Listen

Northwest Awash in Tidal Energy Projects
There’s a veritable gold rush underway. Developers, governments and utilities have staked claims on the most promising wave energy and tidal power sites. Correspondent Tom Banse reports on what it’ll take to light your lights with the power of the tides.
9/20/2007
Listen

Realtors Must Step Up Their Game in Weak Market
Life as a real estate agent isn’t what it used to be. Sanders Lighthall of Eastside Realty in Medford talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson about how how the job changes when the housing market go down, and what green real estate agents will have to learn.
9/20/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Mango Rum' by Paula Bandy
Today is International Talk Like a Pirate Day! Commentator Paula Bandy has found herself getting into the pirate spirit, and got to thinking what makes these rapscallions so appealing ... even before Johnny Depp. Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
9/19/2007
Listen

Barbershop Quartets ... A Hit with the Russians?
Eight years running, the Russian-American Barbershop Harmony Festival has taken place in some of Saint Petersburg's finest concert halls. This year, the festival brought over a comedy quartet from Ashland called Delusions of Grandeur. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy has this story.
9/19/2007
Listen

State Deems Section of Rogue Public, Despite Deeds
Landowners along the Rogue may have deeds that say their property extends into the river, but regulators say the river bed and its banks are owned by the state of Oregon. JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports on the debate over the question: “Who owns the Rogue?”
9/18/2007
Listen

Clock is Ticking for Oregon Signature Gatherers
Time is running out for people trying to overturn two new gay rights laws in Oregon. They have until next Wednesday to gather enough signatures to force the issue to a vote. Salem correspondent Chris Lehman has more.
9/18/2007
Listen

Deadline for Library Vote Looms
Today, Ashland voters will decide on a property tax levy to fund operations of the local library. The levy would ensure the branch is open 40 hours a week. JPR's Jessica Robinson visits former librarian Amy Kinard as she makes a last-ditch effort to get voters to pass the levy.
9/18/2007
Listen

Virtual Learning Gives Educators Real Concerns
More and more California students are attending school in cyber space. But as the number of these virtual schools grows, so do the concerns regarding online learning. Ana Tintocalis of the California Report has this story.
9/17/2007
Listen

Beach Walkers Keep an Eye on Coastal Shifts
You know how after living somewhere for while, you notice any small change? That’s the principle a group called CoastWatch is built on. Coos County coordinators Diane and Dave Bilderback talk with JPR's Jessica Robinson about the citizen monitoring program.
9/17/2007
Listen

Behind the Scenes at the NW Detention Center
When illegal immigrants are captured in Washington, Oregon and Alaska, they’re brought to a federal detention center in Tacoma, Wash. It’s the only facility of its kind in the Northwest. When it opened three years ago, it held 500 detainees. Now it holds on average a thousand. Correspondent Austin Jenkins recently got a rare look inside this federal lock-up.
9/17/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank takes a look -- a very close look -- at one of the most common animals we encounter every day: microbes. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
9/14/2007
Listen

Fake Tsunami, Real Concerns
You probably didn’t hear about the tsunami that crashed into the coast this week. That’s because it didn’t really happen on the coast. It was a simulation, but it raises real concerns. Correspondent Chris Lehman has the story.
9/14/2007
Listen

The Transformative Power of Water
When people have access to clean drinking water, other things start falling into place. That's what a Mount Shasta-based organization called Save the Rain has found. President Kelly Coleman talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson about the power of water.
9/14/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Spam' by Diana Coogle
We all hate e-mail Spam. Many of us remember the real Spam enough to hate it, too. But commentator Diana Coogle thinks Spam has left some worthwhile bits of nostalgia in its wake. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
9/13/2007
Listen

'Maestro's Favorites' Kicks Off Symphony Season
If you could make a symphony play any piece of music, what would it be? Kyle Wiley Pickett actually gets to have his wish realized. Pickett, the conductor of the North State Symphony, sat down with JPR’s Valerie Ing-Miller to talk about the new season.
9/13/2007
Listen

Measure 50 Heats Up Oregon Airwaves
Oregon's special election is still two months away, but the gloves are already off. Measure 50, the so-called Healthy Kids measure, has a new ad. It comes on the heels of a controversial one released by opponents of the measure. Andrew Theen of Oregon Public Broadcasting reports.
9/13/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Sleep's Joy' by John Fisher-Smith
We don't pay much attention to it until we've lost some. Commentator John Fisher-Smith's thoughts have turned lately to sleep's sweet pleasures. Ashland writer John Fisher-Smith is looking forward to publication of a book called "Opening My Eyes."
9/12/2007
Listen

Some Oregon Payday Lenders Pack Up and Leave
Oregon this year passed a series of new restrictions on payday lenders. Many in the industry said the laws would force them to close their doors. Now that the rules have been in place for more than two months, we sent Chris Lehman to find out if the predictions came true. 
9/12/2007
Listen

Firearms Group Funds Teacher's Court Challenge
A Medford high school teacher has re-opened what appears to be a conflict between Oregon gun laws and policies in public schools. The teacher was told she could not bring a weapon on campus. The Oregon Firearms Federation says schools don’t have the authority to make such a rule. Executive Director Kevin Starrett talks with Jessica Robinson.
9/12/2007
Listen

Punishment for Whalers in Eye of Beholder
The five Makah Indian hunters who killed a gray whale over the weekend could face simultaneous charges in federal and tribal court. Opinions differ on and off the Northwest coastal reservation about the proper punishment for the illegal whale hunt. Correspondent Tom Banse reports from Washington’s Olympic Peninsula.
9/11/2007
Listen

Musicians Honor One-Time Northwesterner Guthrie
Woody Guthrie has been called “America’s Okie Poet Laureate.” But Guthrie had a political edge and the singer was blacklisted during the McCarthy Era. JPR's Bob Davy talks with Ashland musicians Dave and Tami Marston about their “Tribute to Woody Guthrie" this weekend.
9/11/2007
Listen

For Fireman's Sister, Hope Lives in 9/11 Community
On Sept. 11, 2001, Mount Shasta resident Marie Mitchell lost her brother, a New York firefighter. In the last six years, Mitchell has become an active member of the 9/11 community. Today, she descibes moving foward, though not on, from that loss. (Interview by Lucy Edwards.)
9/11/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank says there's a reason dragonflies aren't called kittenflies or puppyflies. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
9/7/2007
Listen

Asian Festival to Feature Japanese Kamishibai
The Japanese technique of Kamishibai has been replaced by a faster paced form of storytelling –- the TV. But some people have revived the Kamishibai tradition, and adapted the "paper drama" to American audiences. Roseburg storyteller Joe Ross talks to Jessica Robinson.
9/7/2007
Listen

Rogue Valley Housing Market 'Getting Worse'
The number of U.S. homeowners preparing for a foreclosure has reached a record high. Meanwhile, the housing market dip has become a major slump, and the Rogue Valley is no exception. Medford real estate appraiser Roy Wright talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson.
9/7/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Walking to Oregon Caves' Diana Coogle
Most of the time, a hike over the mountains is just for the sake of hiking. But sometimes, as Diana Coogle points out, it's a form of travel. Diana Coogle is preparing to return to class at the University of Oregon this fall, where she's studying for a Ph.D. in English.
9/6/2007
Listen

Sesqui-Say What?!
No doubt you know "centennial" for 100 years and "bicentennial" for 200, but do you know what the 150th anniversary is called? Oregonians will learn it soon, as the state prepares to commemorate the anniversary of Oregon's statehood in 2009. JPR's Jessica Robinson has more.
9/6/2007
Listen

Timber County Official Opposes Timber Ramp Up
You’d think any politician in a timber county would be highly in favor of an increase in logging. But Josephine County Commissioner Dave Toler is opposing a BLM proposal to triple timber sales in Western Oregon. He tells JPR's Jessica Robinson the plan will set rural counties back.
9/6/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Happy Birthday' Madeleine DeAndreis
Madeleine DeAndreis has a whole lot of candles to blow out -- like others born in 1957, Madeleine is wondering where the time went as she turns 50 this year. Madeleine DeAndreis is a writer and teacher living in Siskiyou County.
9/5/2007
Listen

Ashland's Mexican Counterpart
Most towns have a sister city, but Ashland and Guanajuato, Mexico, have become especially close, so to speak. Guanajuato Mayor Eduardo Romero Hicks gives JPR's Jessica Robinson a cultural snapshot of the town, which will sound rather familiar to Ashlanders.
9/5/2007
Listen

The Making of a Rural Doc
To practice medicine in a remote area is to embrace long hours, professional isolation and lower pay. But the connection to patients can be enormously rewarding. Elizabeth Wynne Johnson follows one medical student as she gets her first taste of rural medicine.
9/4/2007
Listen

County May Run Libraries Public Radio-Style
Does this sound familiar? Member contributions would pay for it, but you don't have to be a member to use it. A group in Josephine County wants to revive the closed library system using a public broadcasting funding model. Organizer Cathye Mason talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson.
9/4/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Nature Notes remembers Mary Paetzel, a local biologist who helped people see their surroundings in a new way. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
8/31/2007
Listen

Before St. Helens, There was the Lassen Eruption
A proposal is being floated to turn Mount St. Helens into a national park. The Park Service is no stranger to volcanoes. Karen Haner of Lassen Volcanic National Park gives JPR's Jessica Robinson a geology lesson on how the volcanoes in Northern California compare to Washington's.
8/31/2007
Listen

Jeers Outnumber Cheers for Volcano National Park
These days, Mount St. Helens looks placid. If it’s action you’re after, look in the towns around the foot of the volcano. People are lining up to support or oppose making the volcano a full-fledged national park.   Correspondent Tom Banse reports.
8/31/2007
Listen

Tree Growers Want to Spruce Up Their Image
Oregon Christmas tree farmers are hoping to capitalize on growing skepticism over the safety of cheap Chinese imports. Fake trees have yet to fall under the recall cloud. But live tree growers want you to believe their product is environmentally-friendly. Chris Lehman has more.
8/29/2007
Listen

'Rachel Corrie' a Tough Line for Theater to Walk
Controversy over the play "My Name is Rachel Corrie" has been churning in Ashland since a local theater pulled the plug on it. The play draws on journals and letters of a Northwest activist who was killed in Gaza. JPR's Jessica Robinson reports on what has led to this play's cancellation.
8/29/2007
Listen

Would-be U.S. Citizens from Iraq Kept Waiting
Across the Pacific Northwest, hundreds of would-be American citizens wait in limbo because the FBI won't clear them to take the oath of citizenship. Iraqis in the region voice particular irritation with slow background checks. Correspondent Tom Banse has this profile.
8/27/2007
Listen

Project Opens a Window into Pelican Bay Prison
The isolation of incarceration goes two ways. Certainly inmates are separated from life in the outside world. But the outside world’s view into prison life is also limited. Jessica Robinson asks Stephen Kurtz about the Pelican Bay Prison Project, which sprung from his correspondence with a man in solitary confinement there.
8/27/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Letter Opener' by Diana Coogle
Diana Coogle finds that even frivolous seeming objects can hold great meaning when they hold memories of people now gone. Author Diana Coogle spends part of every week at the University of Oregon studying for a Ph.D. in English.
8/23/2007
Listen

You Can't Take the Stage Out of the Actor ...
Actor Anthony Heald is back in Ashland doing what he loves best: live theater. Heald talks with JPR's Lucy Edwards about his film and TV roles -- including four seasons on "Boston Public" -- and about returning to the Oregon Shakespeare Festival.
8/23/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Bristlecone Pines' John Fisher-Smith
Something that happened, say, 20 years ago seems pretty far in the past to most of us. But on a recent camping trip, commentator John Fisher-Smith was reminded how little time that really is. Ashland writer John Fisher-Smith is looking forward to publication of a collection of essays.
8/22/2007
Listen

New Biodiesel Refinery Must Use Foreign Oil
At the recent opening of the nation’s biggest biodiesel refinery, speeches touted the benefits of keeping U.S. petro-dollars at home. But the new plant in Hoquiam, Wash., still relies on imported oil -- vegetable oil in this case. Correspondent Tom Banse reports.
8/22/2007
Listen

Medford Swears In First Woman Police Sergeant
This week Kim Budreau became the Medford Police Department's first female sergeant. Law enforcement has traditionally been a tough field for women to crack. But federal statistics show that's changing. Budreau talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson about her experience.
8/22/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Riding the Five' by Judy Ticehurst
Recent big-rig truck accidents have confirmed some people's worries bout dealing with truck traffic on Interstate 5. Although commentator Judy Ticehurst shares those concerns, she can also find a silver lining on that cloud of exhaust. Judy Ticehurst is a writer living in Medford.
8/21/2007
Listen

New Index Puts a Number on Oregon's Artistic Bent
Many cities claim a reputation as an arts community, but what if you could actually measure interest in things like books, music and photography? Oregon Arts Commission executive director Chris D'Arcy talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson about the Creative Vitality Index.
8/21/2007
Listen

Oregon Attorney General to Retire
Oregon’s top prosecutor said today he’ll call it quits at the end of his term. Attorney General Hardy Myers has held the post for ten years. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman has more on the announcement and who might replace Myers.
8/21/2007
Listen

California's Next Water Source Could be the Ocean
Desalination -- removing the salt from salt water -- used to be the province of wealthy, arid countries like Saudi Arabia. Now, proposals for 18 desalination plants are under review up and down the California coast. Amy Standen of the California Report has this story.
8/20/2007
Listen

Chessboard Holds Clues for Stalemated Lawmakers
For the last two months, we've been hearing about California's budget "stalemate." But have you ever stopped to wonder where that word comes from? It's from chess. JPR's Jessica Robinson learns about the dynamics of a stalemate as California lawmakers try to break out of one.
8/20/2007
Listen

More Logging May be On the Way for Northwest
It’s not exactly a return to the heyday of years gone by, but the northwest logging industry has reason to celebrate. Two federal agencies are gearing up to allow more logging in Washington, Oregon and northern California. Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
8/20/2007
Listen

Wyden Hears Public's Frustration at Iraq Forum
Oregon Senator Ron Wyden was in Ashland on Friday for a town hall meeting on the war in Iraq. As at previous forums, the Ashland audience expressed anger with the war and brought the discussion around to impeachment of the president. JPR’s Jessica Robinson has this report.
8/19/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
To botanists it's the world's smallest flowering plant; to most people, it's pond scum. Frank explains its place in the plant world. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
8/17/2007
Listen

Profile of a Sweet Adeline
Most states and at least 12 countries have chapters of Sweet Adelines International, a women’s group dedicated to preserving barbershop harmony. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy profiles one woman came from a musical family, but didn't know she could sing until visiting a rehearsal of the Adelines in her 40s.
8/17/2007
Listen

Wyden Says Iraq Policy Should be About Governance
Oregon Senator Ron Wyden was at SOU this afternoon to talk about the Iraq War, which the Ashland audience was overwhelmingly against. Wyden tells JPR's Jessica Robinson he thinks the focus should be on progress of the Iraqi government, instead of the U.S. military.
8/17/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'They're Playing Our Song' DeAndreis
It’s hard enough finding The One. Commentator Madeleine DeAndreis says finding the right wedding music may be down right impossible. Madeleine DeAndreis is a writer and teacher who lives in Siskiyou County.
8/15/2007
Listen

'Distracted' Explores Life in an ADD World
The number of kids being diagnosed with ADD has been on the rise. But then, as playwright Lisa Loomer points out, everyone’s attention is pulled in all sorts of directions these days. Loomer talks with JPR's Bob Davy about "Distracted," showing at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival.
8/15/2007
Listen

When Shakespearean Grandeur Meets Hollywood Glitz
Shakepeare has been a standard of the film industry almost since the industry’s inception. But in some ways, they’ve been a mismatched pair. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy visits Camelot Theater's production of “Shakespeare in Hollywood,” which pokes fun at the contrast.
8/14/2007

Tale of a Foreclosed Home
The wave of mortgage foreclosures continues to break over California. In the first half of this year, lenders foreclosed on nearly 30,000 California homes, and analysts say that the crisis is far from over. Tamara Keith of the California Report takes a journey through real estate Limbo.
8/14/2007
Listen

Rogue Valley Papers Will Likely be Up for Grabs
Media watchdogs are waiting to see what will happen to the Wall Street Journal, now that Rupert Murdoch has secured Dow Jones & Co. But a collection of smaller newspapers around the country –- including two in Southern Oregon -- are facing another quandary: What will it mean to be sold by Rupert Murdoch? JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports.
8/14/2007
Listen

How a Bridge Gets its Rating
California has 122 bridges that rate lower -- in some cases much lower -- than the one that collapsed in Minneapolis. Amy Standen of the California Report visited one of the state's lowest rated bridges to find out how engineers determine a bridge's safety.
8/13/2007
Listen

Stark Closes a Chapter
Just months after taking the helm of Jackson County's library system, Ted Stark had to close it. Now, Stark is taking a job in Wisconsin. He talks with Jessica Robinson about his decision to leave, the future of the libraries ... and putting the nation's largest library closure on his resume.
8/13/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Everyone knows you can tell a tree's age by its rings. But why is that? Frank explains. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
8/10/2007
Listen

Looking for the Next Generation of Opera Roles
Frederica von Stade and Sam Ramey have been celebrated on just about every major stage, opera house and concert hall in the world. Saturday night they will appear together on the Britt in Jacksonville. Von Stade and Ramey reflect on their 20-plus year careers with JPR’s Milt Goldman.
8/10/2007
Listen

'Seaweed Lady' Catalogs Oregon's Marine Plant Life
Technically, Dr. Gayle Hansen is a "marine phycologist," but at the Mark Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, Ore., Hansen’s known as the Seaweed Lady. Hansen talks with JPR's Bob Binnewies about her research on the West Coast's seaweed.
8/10/2007
Listen

Enviros Say Timber Expansion Reopens Old Wounds
The Bureau of Land Management has proposed tripling the timber volume up for auction in Western Oregon. Officials say they're trying to meet obligations to timber counties. Environmental groups, like KS-Wild in Ashland, say the plan won't sustain counties in the long term ...
8/10/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Life Math' by Diana Coogle
Have you ever tried to tally up the value of all the decisions you've made? A recent article in the Journal of the American Medical Association inspired Diana Coogle to do some math. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
8/9/2007
Listen

Kahane to Perform the Concerto that Broke the Mold
Renowned pianist and conductor Jeffrey Kahane is performing Beethoven’s 4th piano concerto tomorrow in Jacksonville. Kahane talks with JPR’s Milt Goldman about learning to see the metaphor in music, and how Beethoven shocked audiences.
8/9/2007
Listen

Northwest Hops Crops are Tops
Hops are a key ingredient that gives beer its bitterness. And virtually all the United States hops crop comes from here in the Northwest. Beer makers and hops experts are gathering today and tomorrow in Oregon to discuss the flowering vine. Correspondent Chris Lehman has more.
8/9/2007
Listen

Federal Money to Give NW Logging a Boost
The Northwest will see a rise in logging of federal forests over the next few years. The Bush Administration is directing $24.7 million to Oregon and Washington to boost the number of board feet taken off federal land, including Southern Oregon's Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest ...
8/9/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Wire Cutters' by Paula Bandy
Paula Bandy likes to walk through the rangelands near her home in the Klamath Basin, but found the going sometimes gets rough. So, she decided to take matters into her own hands. Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
8/8/2007
Listen

Children's Theater Stages Play on the Ultimate Kid
Through the ages, fairy tales have given children escape from the daily demands of learning how to live in a world of adults. Today, it's "Harry Potter." In years past, it was stories like "Peter Pan." This month, the Children's Musical Theater of Oregon is staging "Peter Pan." Co-founders John and Rhonda Taylor talk with JPR's Bob Davy.
8/8/2007
Listen

Republicans Demand Cuts, Dem Refuses to Shave
California lawmakers have tried various tactics to convince Senate Republicans to vote for a state budget. There’s been cajoling, editorials, even yard signs. But Assemblyman Jared Huffman has an unusual strategy: grow a beard ...
8/8/2007
Listen

TBI: A Northwest Soldier's Struggle to Recover
Roadside bombs kill and maim soldiers on a regular basis in Iraq. The powerful blasts don't just destroy the body. The concussive force can also damage the brain. That's why many soldiers are being diagnosed with TBI or Traumatic Brain Injury. Austin Jenkins introduces us to a Northwest soldier who's coping with TBI.
8/8/2007

Tree House Movement Has Roots in Takilma, Oregon
Tree houses aren’t childhood whimsy any more. Builders are fine tuning the craft of making livable treetop homes. One builder who's helped pave the way for Swiss Family Robinson-style living runs a famous B&B near the California border. Michael Garnier talks with Jessica Robinson.
8/7/2007
Listen

Northwest Farmers May See New Yields in Farm Bill
Twice a decade, lawmakers craft the multi-billion dollar behemoth that shapes U.S. agriculture. This time, growers in the region may get a heartier bite of the pie. Correspondents Chris Lehman and Anna King went out to the fields for the story.
8/7/2007
Listen

Profile of a Protected Witness
California’s Witness Protection Program was started in 1998 with $3 million in state funding. But witness protection isn’t like it is on TV. Scott Shafer of the California Report spent time with a young woman who’s in the program after testifying against the man who killed her son to see how it’s changed her life.
8/6/2007
Listen

Like Regular Donkeys ... Only Smaller
Southern Oregon will be invaded by miniature donkeys and their owners this weekend. Jackson County is hosting a national miniature donkey competition. JPR's Bob Binnewies asks Williams resident Delores Durando, a National Miniature Donkey Association board member, about the animal's enthusiastic following.
8/6/2007
Listen

Farmer's Market Accepts Wal-Mart's Helping Hand
The Medford farmer’s market is getting some assistance from the world’s largest retailer, Wal-Mart. The weekly Growers and Crafters Market hopes to move to a site owned by the store in September. JPR’s Jessica Robinson has more.
8/6/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank is just itching to talk about a certain pest dog owners may be familiar with ... the flea. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
8/3/2007
Listen

Virtuosity at 19
Music history is replete with stories of "wunderkind," who are especially talented at a young age. This evening, a modern phenom is performing in the Rogue Valley. JPR’s Milt Goldman caught up with the 19-year-old violinist Nicola Benedetti at a rehearsal for the Britt Festival.
8/3/2007
Listen

Much of Federal Firefighting Not By Federal Hires
Federal crews aren't the only ones who face risks when forests ignite. Three recent fatalities in Northern California were employees of private companies that contract with the government. Jessica Robinson asks the Forest Service's Duane Lyon about the role of contractors.
8/3/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Getting Rid of Get' by Diana Coogle
How much attention do you pay to the words you use? Commentator Diana Coogle has this quandary for you: Could you get by without using the word "get"? Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
8/2/2007
Listen

From Prodigy to Pro
Virtuoso pianist Norman Krieger will be performing with the Britt Festival Orchestra Saturday night in Jacksonville. Krieger talks with JPR’s Milt Goldman about growing up as a child prodigy and the approach he now takes to music.
8/2/2007

Tsunami Exchange Forms Between West and East
In the wake of the 2004 tsunami, the U.S. is helping south Asian nations develop a robust warning system. Aid money went to the University of Washington and NOAA for an international training program. Tom Banse reports on what West Coast and south Asia can learn from each other.
8/2/2007
Listen

14-Year-Old Beekeeper Gets National Recognition
Fourteen year old Kelton Shockey of Applegate, Ore., won a national contest for an essay he wrote on strengthening bee colonies. Kelton suggests finding a fix for colony collapse disorder may require beekeepers to rethink how they manage their hives.
8/1/2007
Listen

8th Grader's Experiment Challenges School Policy
When students in North Bend, Ore., return to class this fall, some may think twice before drinking from the school water fountains. This spring, a kid named Kyleray Katherman used skills he learned in science class to test the fountains' cleanliness. It all started with a schoolwide ban on water bottles. JPR's Jessica Robinson has more.
8/1/2007
Listen

A Conductor's Work is Never Done
The incomparable sounds of a live symphony orchestra meet the breadth of an outdoor amphitheater once again this weekend at the Britt Festivals in Jacksonville. JPR’s Milt Goldman caught up with Peter Bay, Britt conductor for 15 seasons, after this morning’s rehearsal.
7/31/2007
Listen

The Klamath's Troubled Waters
A House committee probed allegations today that Dick Cheney intervened to divert more water to Klamath Basin farms and contributed to a massive fish kill on the Klamath River in 2002. The Klamath has been a troubled river for some time. Craig Miller of the California Report traveled along the Klamath and has this story.
7/31/2007
Listen

How to Pick the Perfect Watermelon
It’s a big question every summer -- how to get the very best watermelon. Correspondent Anna King went to the heart of watermelon country in Hermiston, Ore., with a mission to learn what to look for.
7/30/2007
Listen

Oregon Farmers Enter Their Blue(berry) Period
Fans of fresh produce love to browse farmers markets and roadside stands at this time of year for their favorite fruits and veggies. An increasingly popular choice is the blueberry. And Oregon is becoming one of the nation’s leading producers. Chris Lehman has more.
7/30/2007
Listen

Eco Plumbers Reuse 'Grey Water' Under the Radar
Once you use tap water for things like dishes and laundry it typically goes down the drain and out into the sewer. Some environmentalists see that as a lot of wasted water, and a few are testing the limits of how far you can go to recapture that water before running into trouble with the law. Amy Standen of the California Report has this story.
7/30/2007
Listen

Williams Residents Ask for to Cease to Clearcuts
This afternoon, a group of Williams, Ore., residents held a rally to protest clearcutting near their homes. They say the hills near town have been visibly scarred and that the logging practice increases the possibility of erosion and water contamination. JPR's Jessica Robinson reports.
7/30/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
It may look like an ostrich and act like an ostrich ... but in fact the rhea is unrelated to the ostrich. Frank explains ... Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
7/27/2007
Listen

DEQ on Bear Creek: 'Clean it Up'
The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality has released a plan to reduce pollution in Bear Creek, which runs right through Jackson County's major cities. Fish are having a hard time living in the water, and humans are recommended to avoid it. JPR's Jessica Robinson asks the DEQ's Bill Myers what the mandate could mean for residents.
7/27/2007
Listen

Study: Half of Oregon's New Farmers Markets Fail
Interest in locally grown food has brought about a boom in farmers markets around the country. But while there are plenty of start-ups, a new study finds keeping a farmers market going is another matter. Jessica Robinson reports. Chris Lehman and Bob Davy contributed to this story.
7/27/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Reading Houses' by Diana Coogle
Diana Coogle spent the last year living in a garage apartment four days a week. Now that she's home, Diana has a new perspective on what our homes say about us. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
7/26/2007
Listen

Brick by Brick
In post-Katrina New Orleans, a project with Oregon roots is making its mark on the rebuilding effort. It aims to preserve more of the original by applying conservation concepts like "re-use" and "recycle" to damaged buildings. Elizabeth Wynne Johnson reports.
7/26/2007
Listen

String Theory
The Britt Festivals have created a number of summer musical camps for kids, including the string quartet academy. This year’s program features the renowned Arianna String Quartet as the professional group in residence. JPR’s Milt Goldman talks with violinist John McGrosso.
7/26/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Fred' by Madeleine DeAndreis
Madeleine DeAndreis remembers her childhood friend Fred Burns, who turned his affliction with spina bifida into a career in comedy. Madeleine DeAndreis is a writer and teacher living in Siskiyou County.
7/25/2007
Listen

'Greener' Homes Go From an Option to the Rule
A big factor in the size of our carbon footprint is our home. In the quest to combat climate change, one Northwest state is zeroing in on the energy efficiency of new homes. And the tactic may spread. Tom Banse has more.
7/25/2007
Listen

Douglas County Commissioners Oppose Pipeline
Commissioners in Douglas County have come out against a plan to build a natural gas pipeline through Southern Oregon. In a resolution approved Wednesday, commissioners say the project usurps the rights of county property owners. JPR's Jessica Robinson has more.
7/25/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Dance' by Scott Smith
What happens when we get used to the things around us? Commentator Scott Smith recently rediscovered what he’s been missing out on ... through the eyes, and ears, of children. Scott Smith and his wife are taking care of their first two foster kids. They live in Grants Pass.
7/23/2007
Listen

Helicopter Crash at California Fire Kills Pilot
Fire officials say there’s been a fatality at the Elk Complex in Northern California. A helicopter fighting the blaze went down around 10 a.m., killing the pilot. Officials have not released the name while they try to contact family ...
7/23/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank finds the beginning of the Rogue River at Crater Lake National Park. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
7/20/2007
Listen

Blind Fans in Oregon Not Left Out of Potter Mania
Harry Potter fans worldwide are eagerly anticipating tonight’s release of the seventh and final book in the blockbuster series. That includes the blind. In Oregon, those fans won’t have to wait long to find out what happens. Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
7/20/2007
Listen

Couple Brings Japanese Taiko to Base of Mt. Shasta
Since 1985, Jeanne Mercer and Russel Baba have helped create a small community of taiko drummers in Mount Shasta –- a surprising place for the Japanese art, but also a fitting place for music known for its mountainous sound. Mercer and Baba talk with Jessica Robinson.
7/20/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Jim Earl' by Diana Coogle
Diana Coogle went back to school this year to earn a Ph.D. in English. In the process, she ended up relearning certain things she thought she knew. Diana Coogle's latest book is "An Explosion of Stars." She's studying for a Ph.D. at the University of Oregon.
7/19/2007
Listen

Dems in GOP Territory
The Democratic Party is gunning for Sen. Gordon Smith's seat in 2008. And money from the Democratic National Committee is funding an organizer in Oregon who will focus on Republican counties in the southern part of the state. Jessica Robinson talks with Mary Van Noy.
7/19/2007
Listen

Drugstore Cowboys: Feds Crack Burglary Ring
Federal authorities have cracked the most prolific pharmacy burglary ring in the Northwest, if not the nation. The break-in artists hit dozens of drug stores in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and California between 2004 and 2006. Their target: heavy-duty painkillers like OxyContin that can sell for three times their value on the street. Austin Jenkins reports.
7/19/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Blisters' by Paula Bandy
Some writers look for inspiration in their surroundings. Paula Bandy was recently reminded that other times, inspiration is something you have to work for. Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
7/18/2007
Listen

'De-Lovely' Play of the '30s Staged in Grants Pass
Rogue Music Theater is reaching back to an era of musical theater that’s not frequently revisited –- the 1930s. The Grants Pass theater is now performing Cole Porter’s 1934 classic “Anything Goes.” JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy went to have a look.
7/18/2007
Listen

The Gas is Cheaper on the Other Side
The Medford-Ashland area often tops Oregon's list of priciest gas. But that's where drivers from Yreka, Calif., head for a bargain. When gas prices skyrocket, Yreka tends to feel it more than other cities on the Interstate 5 corridor. JPR's Jessica Robinson looked for answers.
7/18/2007
Listen

Potato Harvest Gets Off to a Hot and Dusty Start
Did you know the next French fry you shove in your mouth probably came from just east of the Cascades? The annual potato harvest is underway in Eastern Oregon and Washington. Correspondent Anna King got up early to follow a potato farmer and his crew.
7/17/2007
Listen

Classical Festival Capitalizes on Pirate Craze
This year's Oregon Coast Music Festival includes a nod to the rascally seafaring character who's garnered a huge amount of popularity lately -– the pirate. JPR's Jessica Robinson asks conductor Jason Klein what he found in his search for pirate-themed classical music.
7/17/2007
Listen

Smokey Bear Headed for Myspace and Cell Phones
When's the last time you saw or heard from Smokey Bear? The Forest Service's ad agency is in the process of revamping its iconic fire prevention campaign. Correspondent Tom Banse reports on Smokey's upgrade.
7/17/2007
Listen

NW Troops Repay Debt by Sponsoring Iraqi Refugees
Iraqi refugees have begun to trickle into the Northwest. They're mostly translators who assisted Northwest soldiers on deployments in Iraq. In some instances, local troops are repaying a debt by sponsoring the Iraqi immigrants. Correspondent Tom Banse has a profile of one Iraqi whose arrival could be a sign of things to come.
7/16/2007
Listen

Researchers Double-Check Feds' Tree Vole Data
Around this time of year, groups of volunteer researchers head out to the forest to climb trees and look for bundles of twigs and Douglas fir needles. These could be red tree vole nests. JPR’s Bob Binnewies talked with the Northwest Ecosystem Survey Team member Laura Beaton about the challenge of getting data on the secretive tree vole, and what these animals can tell us.
7/16/2007
Listen

Flip Floppin' Coho May Go on Threatened List Again
One of the few Pacific Northwest salmon populations not on the endangered species list may join its fellow fish there. A federal magistrate has recommended that Oregon Coast coho be reevaluated for listing. Correspondent Tom Banse has more.
7/16/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
On his recent trip to Patagonia, Frank encountered the camel's cuter, South American cousin -- the guanaco. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
7/13/2007
Listen

Even in Ashland, Shakespeare Isn't Sacred
Anything as revered as Shakespeare is really asking to be made fun of by someone. An Ashland theater is stepping up to the task. This week, “The Compleat Works of Wllm Shkspr (abridged)” opened at Oregon Stage Works. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy has this story.
7/13/2007
Listen

Murdoch Would Acquire Local Papers with Dow Jones
Rupert Murdoch’s play for the Wall Street Journal could also give him ownership of Ottaway Community Newspapers, which owns the Medford Mail Tribune and the Ashland Daily Tidings. James Ottaway Jr. talked with Paul Steinle earlier today on JPR’s Jefferson Exchange.
7/13/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Fire from the Dragon's Tongue' Coogle
In 2002, the Biscuit fire began with a string of lightning strikes, like those we’ve seen in the last few days in the region. Today, commentator Diana Coogle describes what it’s like to live in a forest prone to wildfire. Diana Coogle's book "Fire from the Dragon's Tongue" was a 1999 Oregon Book Award finalist.
7/12/2007
Listen

New Life, Controversy Rise from Ashes of Biscuit
The U.S. Forest Service’s plan to sell off some of the trees burned in the Biscuit fire was greeted by protests and lawsuits. And recent scientific studies have suggested the practice of salvage logging makes future fires worse. But Forest Service officials say the practice is an important part of post-fire restoration. Chris Lehman visits the site of the 2002 fire.
7/12/2007
Listen

Documentary Explores Biscuit Fire Fallout, Lessons
Five years ago today, lightning sparked a series of fires in Southern Oregon that would grow into the massive Biscuit Fire, which ignited a political battle that still rages on. JPR’s Jessica Robinson finds out what journalist Barbara Bernstein discovered in making "Sculpted by Fire," a radio documentary on the Biscuit.
7/12/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Art Matters' by John Fisher-Smith
John Fisher-Smith marks the passing of an artist friend, and considers the power of art to transform lives -- including his own. Ashland writer John Fisher-Smith is looking forward to publication of a book called "Opening My Eyes."
7/11/2007
Listen

New York Test Drives Cell Phone Ban
A year from now, California law will forbid you from using your cell phone while driving, unless you are using a headset or another “hands-free” device with it. New York state has had a similar law for several years. Craig Miller of the California Report found out how the ban is working.
7/11/2007
Listen

Local Growers Preserve Native Medicinal Plants
Before there was ever such a thing here as Western medicine, North American tribes passed on knowledge about the benefits of native plants from generation to generation. This weekend, Southern Oregon will host a national conference on preserving these medicinal plants. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with author and seed distributor Richo Cech.
7/11/2007
Listen

'Smokey Joe's' Remembers Jukebox Darlings
There are certain songs that will forever elicit memories of the 1950s and '60s –- whether you actually were there or not. Songs like “Hound Dog,” and “Stand by Me.” These songs, and many others associated with the period, were written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. They're the subject of "Smokey Joe's Cafe," now showing at the Oregon Cabaret Theater in Ashland. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy has this story.
7/10/2007
Listen

Search For Alternative Energy Looks Out to Sea
Some power companies are trying to harness the movement of water in the Pacific. “Wave power" projects have been proposed at Reedsport, Ore., and near Eureka, Calif. Now, the city of San Francisco is looking beneath the Golden Gate Bridge for a similar new source of energy. Judy Campbell of the California Report takes a look at ocean-based energy.
7/10/2007
Listen

Massive Pot Purge Launches in Shasta County
One of the largest marijuana eradication efforts on public land launched this week in Northern California. Law enforcement officials say pot plantations cultivated by Mexican drug traffickers in national forests pose a safety risk to the public and the environment ...
7/10/2007
Listen

The Young and the Fiddle-Playing
When you picture the Grand Master Fiddler, what do you imagine? Probably not twentysomethings like Tashina and Tristan Clarridge. JPR’s Valerie Ing-Miller talked with the brother and sister from Northern California and learned what the next generation of fiddle players is like.
7/9/2007
Listen

Oregon Courts 'Simpsons' Movie
Voting ends tonight in an online contest to decide which non-fictional Springfield should host the premiere of the "Simpsons Movie." Fourteen towns took the bait –- including Springfield, Ore. The gimmick has attracted the attention of various politicians, including the governor of Oregon. JPR's Jessica Robinson has more ...
7/9/2007
Listen

State Releases Figures on Golden State, circa 2050
California will add another 25 million people by mid-century. That’s the latest projection from the state’s Department of Finance. The figures also show a shift in the ethnic makeup of residents. Correspondent Marianne Russ reports.
7/9/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank Lang uncovers the criticism of government scientists that was dished out a century ago. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
7/6/2007
Listen

C-Section System Developed for Rural Hospitals
Researchers at Oregon State University have developed a prototype communication system to streamline communication at rural hospitals during emergency Caesarean sections, when the danger to mother and child increases as time ticks by. JPR's Jessica Robinson interview OSU engineer Ken Funk.
7/6/2007
Listen

Willie Nelson Sings the Praises of Biofuel
Legendary county music star Willie Nelson took time off from his northwest concert tour today to visit Oregon’s state caiptal. He helped the state’s only commercial biodiesel plant kick off an expansion project. Correspondent Chris Lehman has this story.
7/6/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Moonvine' by Diana Coogle
What does your family do for entertainment? While writer Diana Coogle was growing up in Georgia, her family watched flowers bloom, much to her gratitude now. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
7/5/2007
Listen

From Print to the Airwaves
Last week, Jefferson Public Radio launched a third hour of its morning talk show, the Jefferson Exchange -- this hour from JPR’s Redding studios. We meet the new host of the program, Bruce Ross, who's also the editorial writer at the Redding Record Searchlight.
7/5/2007
Listen

Dogs Become California Winemakers' Best Friend
Recently, the tiny “vine mealy bug” has taken hold in California, threatening 40,000 acres of grapes. Now researchers have found a new tool in the fight against the mealy bug -- a friendly, four-legged ally with a keen sense of smell. Colin Berry of the California Report has this story.
7/5/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'This Land is Our Land' DeAndreis
American flags aren’t reserved just for the Fourth of July any more. Since 9-11, more Americans have been buying flags and flying them all year-round. Commentator Madeleine DeAndreis wonders if it’s just patriotism that’s on display.
7/4/2007
Listen

Sounds of the Fourth
From the parade in the morning, to the fireworks after dark, small town July 4th celebrations are full of familiar sounds. In Ashland, a concert accompanies the pop-pop of fireworks. JPR's Bob Binnewies talks with Max and Scott McKee of the American Band College.
7/4/2007
Listen

Litter Patrol: An Ugly Job and Teens Want to Do It
In the old days, you used to see inmate chain gangs picking up litter along the highway. These days you're more likely to see a gang of teenagers. As Correspondent Austin Jenkins reports it may be a dirty, dangerous job, but it's surprisingly competitive.
7/3/2007
Listen

Klamath Water Spotlighted for Cheney Interference
The Washington Post reported last week that political interference by Vice President Dick Cheney led to a Klamath water plan that violated federal environmental laws and may have caused the largest salmon die-off in the West. The article has spurred a Congressional hearing.

JPR's Jessica Robinson talks first with California Democratic Congressman Mike Thompson, whose constituents include coastal fishermen, then with Greg Addington of the Klamath Water Users Association, which represents family farmers and ranchers.
7/3/2007
Listen

Playing Cards Take the Stage in Carroll Classic
Like most great works of children’s literature, Lewis Carroll’s "Alice in Wonderland" isn’t just for children. One-Eleven Evelyn, a community theater in Grants Pass, opens a stage production of "Alice in Wonderland" this week. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy has this preview.
7/2/2007
Listen

Fire Promises to Turn Tahoe Murky
The 3,100-acre Angora Fire burned in the watershed of Lake Tahoe, a lake renowned for its sapphire waters and clarity. Just think of all the cars in California that sport bumper stickers saying “Keep Tahoe Blue.” As Tamara Keith of the California Report learned, researchers are already examining how the lake could be affected by the fire.
7/2/2007
Listen

Jockeying Among LNG Developers Picks Up
Four companies have their eyes on the lower Columbia River and another likes Coos Bay for a natural gas terminal. Insiders say the region probably can support only one tanker terminal. And opponents aim to make it none. Tom Banse has the latest on a brewing showdown.
7/2/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank recognizes the Scotish fellow who devoted his life to studying nature, and lent his name to many of the Northwest's natives. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
6/29/2007
Listen

Beefalo: Some Ranchers Hope It's What's for Dinner
What do you get when you cross a cow with a buffalo? You get a sleepy cottage industry that's just received an injection of cash to introduce more consumers to the hybrid meat. The combination of buffalo and beef cattle goes by the name "beefalo." Tom Banse got a taste.
6/29/2007

Final Gavel Falls in Salem, Sacramento Falls Short
With a bang of the gavel, the 2007 session of the Oregon legislature came to an end Thursday. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman has a wrap up. Meanwhile, in California Jenny O'Mara reports lawmakers won't be able to bang out a budget in time for the new fiscal year.
6/29/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Boy with Frisbee' by Diana Coogle
Children aren't very good at hiding their feelings. Commentator Diana Coogle says you can usually tell what they want -- if you just watch. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
6/28/2007
Listen

Northwest Wineries Trudge Through Bottling Season
We’re all familiar with the grape harvest in the fall. But in summer a different kind of harvest takes place at wineries. The part few people ever see. Correspondent Anna King takes us through the inner workings of bottling season.
6/28/2007
Listen

Tahoe Residents Come to the Aid of Newly Homeless
More than 200 homes in the South Lake Tahoe area have burned to the ground in the Angora fire and hundreds of people have been displaced. The fire is considered the worst the area has experienced in a century. As Correspondent Marianne Russ reports, the community is rallying around those who’ve lost everything.
6/28/2007
Listen

Oregon Bald Eagles Rebound
This morning, federal officials took the bald eagle off the endangered species list. Oregonians enjoy the occasional bald eagle spotting -– and more so recently. JPR's Jessica Robinson asks state conservation strategy coordinator Peg Boulay about Oregon's eagles, and why they're staying on the state list.
6/28/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Sound of a Train is Jazz' Paula Bandy
Paula Bandy has noticed more freight trains lately, passing through the Klamath region. She welcomes the sound and the sight of them -- a reminder of different places and times. Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
6/27/2007
Listen

'I started listening to hip-hop songs ...'
Over the last month, we’ve been meeting exchange students who’ve spent their year in Southern Oregon. Today, our series wraps up for the summer with Ai Tokumatsu, a Southern Oregon University student from Japan. (Interview by Bob Davy.)
6/27/2007
Listen

California's Overcrowded Prisons Go Before Court
A federal court is considering whether to take the first step towards capping California's prison population. Right now, nearly 180,000 inmates live in spaces designed for roughly half that number. Julie Small has the story.
6/27/2007
Listen

Radio Webstreams Go Silent
Radio Internet streams went dead today as webcasters across the country participated in a "day of silence." Stations, including Jefferson Public Radio, protested a hike in music royalty fees. Jessica Robinson explains.
6/26/2007
Listen

Author Advocates Reclaiming Rhetorical Speech
Rhetoric has become a dirty word, especially in politics. But Scott Kaiser says it was Shakespeare's ability to use rhetoric that made his writing so effective. JPR's Jessica Robinson interviews Kaiser about his book "Shakespeare's Wordcraft" (Limelight Editions) and what politicians could learn from the Bard.
6/26/2007
Listen

Sport of Rowing Makes Waves in Region
You need only look out to the lakes and bays to find one of the region’s most popular sports. Rowing clubs have attracted big memberships in Humboldt County, Redding and Ashland. JPR's Bob Binnewies interviews Deborah Gordon of the Ashland Rowing Club.
6/25/2007
Listen

Erasing Old Roads in the Forest
The Forest Service is asking Congress for funds to decommission roads in the West. First, correspondent Elizabeth Wynne Johnson reports on the request. Then, JPR's Jessica Robinson asks Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest roads manager Ian Bayliss how roads are removed.
6/25/2007
Listen

One-Party Rule Yields Mixed Bag in Salem
This was the first session in 16 years that one political party enjoyed control of the Oregon House, the Senate, and the Governor’s office. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman reports on how things worked out with the Democrats in charge.
6/25/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank looks at a peculiar immigrant to America -- the armadillo. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
6/22/2007
Listen

'Spitfire Grill' Re-Envisioned as a Musical
The movie "The Spitfire Grill" opened at Sundance in 1996 with the tagline “To a town with no future, comes a girl with a past.” The same story has since been adapted to the stage. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy has this preview of the production at Camelot Theatre in Talent.
6/22/2007
Listen

Flight Attendant Wings Through Lifetime of Change
Fair warning if you're flying Alaska Airlines for the rest of this month. The region's dominant airline is dressing crews in classic uniforms to celebrate its 75th anniversary. Correspondent Tom Banse profiles a 40-year veteran who says flight attendant is still a good career.
6/22/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Assessment' by Diana Coogle
When commentator Diana Coogle decided to go to grad school, she had certain ideas of what it would be like. Now that Diana's home for the summer from the University of Oregon, she takes a moment to evaluate her first year. Author Diana Coogle is earning a Ph.D. in English.
6/21/2007
Listen

Amid Emissions Anxiety Manual Mowers Pick Up Steam
According to the EPA, a gas-powered push lawnmower pollutes as much in an hour as 11 cars. One Northern California business owner is capitalizing on the comeback of the low emissions alternative: the manual mower. Yep, they do still exist. JPR's Jessica Robinson interviews Marjorie King of Reel Mowers, Etc. about the mission behind her product.
6/21/2007
Listen

Low Flows Could Put Klamath Salmon in Hot Water
Salmon runs in the Klamath River are looking stronger this year, but a low snowpack could mean higher water temperatures -- which salmon don't do well in. And the salmon's wellbeing can affect farmers, tribes, and coastal fishers. JPR's Jessica Robinson gets a salmon status report.
6/21/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Tree of Life' by John Fisher-Smith
John Fisher-Smith says we need dig deeper to understand the root of problems in the community. Ashland writer John Fisher-Smith is looking forward to publication of a book called "Opening My Eyes."
6/20/2007
Listen

Redding to Mark Solstice at its Colossal Sundial
If you wanted to see the sun in action on the longest day of the year, you might go to a huge sundial. Like the 217-foot one at Redding's famous Sundial Bridge. Jessica Robinson talks with Lori Salles about what's happening in the sky and what's happening in Redding on the solstice.
6/20/2007
Listen

Natural Gas Exploration Underway Near Coos Bay
A Portland company is expanding its exploration for natural gas underneath coastal Northwest forestland. Torrent Energy, has secured natural gas drilling rights to more than a quarter million acres in Southern Oregon and in Washington state. Tom Banse has more.
6/20/2007
Listen

Sites Compete for Controversial Nuclear Recycling
If you live in the Northwest, here's an acronym you should know: G-NEP. It stands for Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. It's the Bush Administration's initiative to expand the use of nuclear energy. The goal is to build more nuclear power plants AND new facilities to treat the waste they produce. That's where the Northwest comes in. Three locations in nearby states are competing to become nuclear recycling centers. Correspondent Austin Jenkins reports.
6/19/2007
Listen

Mental Health Officials Say Facility Impacts Care
With changes in ideas about mental health treatment comes the need for changes in mental health facilities -– though that can be a slow process. In Klamath County, mental health officials are celebrating the county’s recent approval of a brand new residential treatment center. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with Ann Lynn, the director of mental health in the county.
6/19/2007
Listen

Oregon Reclaims Ability to Enforce No Call List
Last year, 15,000 Oregonians on the national Do Not Call registry reported receiving telemarketing calls. But the federal government rarely enforces its list. A newly signed bill in Oregon gives the state the authority to go after violators. JPR's Jessica Robinson interviews Stephanie Soden with the state Department of Justice.
6/19/2007
Listen

No Free Wi-Fi?
You know the old saying "there's no such thing as free lunch"? Well, it may also be true of free Internet access. Cities are racing to create wireless networks to be available, supposedly, at no cost to users. But will it work? Amy Standen of the California Report has this story.
6/18/2007
Listen

Same Trees, New Convenient Size
Researchers at Oregon State University have figured out how to control tree height through genetic modification. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with forest scientist Steve Strauss about how they created miniature poplars, and what uses these scaled down trees could have.
6/18/2007
Listen

Past Catches Up with Travelers at Northern Border
Some travelers who used to blithely cross the Canadian border are being tripped up by their pasts. Thanks to improved databases and information sharing, border guards can now call up records of crimes that keep you from entering Canada or the USA. Tom Banse reports.
6/15/2007
Listen

Despite Budget Crisis, Job Numbers Stay Strong
Lately, the big news in timber country has been budget cuts and county layoffs. But it turns out, the financial crisis barely made a dent in a key economic indicator. JPR's Jessica Robinson asks regional economist Guy Tauer about Southern Oregon's latest employment figures.
6/15/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Great Blue Herons are usually seen in marshy areas. Frank explains why one was seen hanging out in the rough at an Ashland golf course. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by JPR.
6/15/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Wiffle Ball' by Diana Coogle
Not all sporting events are about competition. Commentator Diana Coogle, playing wiffle ball recently, discovered the fun of the game was in its mayhem. Author Diana Coogle spends part of every week at the University of Oregon studying for a Ph.D. in English.
6/14/2007
Listen

Wyden Wants Tax Incentive for Fuel Efficient Cars
Oregon Senator Ron Wyden wants to give consumers an extra nudge toward energy efficiency. The Democrat introduced a federal bill today that would offer car buyers tax incentives to go for fuel efficient models. JPR's Jessica Robinson asks Wyden how the program would work.
6/14/2007
Listen

Universal Health Care Discussed in Salem
The Oregon Senate tomorrow is set to take up one of the most contentious issues of the legislative session: a cigarette tax to pay for children’s health insurance. But a health care bill with potentially a much wider impact is also up for a vote. From Salem, Chris Lehman reports.
6/14/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Procrastination' Madeleine DeAndreis
Some people think of procrastination as a character flaw. But commentator Madeleine DeAndreis says it's more like an extreme sport ... at which she excels. Madeleine DeAndreis is a writer and teacher living in Siskiyou County.
6/13/2007
Listen

Ecologist Says Owl Plan Could Reignite Timber Wars
The Bush Administration wants to scale back the amount of forest land deemed “critical habitat” for the northern spotted owl. JPR's Jessica Robinson gets the reaction of Dr. Dominick Della Sala, chief scientist at the National Center for Conservation Science and Policy in Ashland.
6/13/2007
Listen

California to Take Feds to Court Over Emissions
California today announced plans to sue the federal government. In order to impose tough regulations on tailpipe emissions, the state needs the cooperation of federal regulators. JPR's Jessica Robinson asks California EPA secretary Linda Adams to explain the grounds for the suit.
6/13/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'For Father's Day' by Linda Vogel
They say time heals all wounds. But commentator Linda Vogel realized when it comes to her father, she couldn’t wait for time.
Linda Vogel is a writer and fiber artist living in Ashland. She has a daughter, who's 14.
6/12/2007
Listen

New Research Defies Conventional Forestry Wisdom
Contrary to the customary post-fire practice, salvage logging and planting seedlings after a forest fire won't reduce fire risk, according to a new study. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with co-authors Jonathan Thompson and Thomas Spies about their paper.
6/12/2007
Listen

A Change of Heart on Immigration
The U.S. Senate last week failed to vote on a plan that would make it easier for companies to bring in guest workers. One of the people speaking up for the region's orchardists has seen his personal views flip 180-degrees on immigration. Tom Banse has this profile.
6/11/2007
Listen

Chalkboard Project Plans School Audits
The Chalkboard Project is piloting a series of audits at Oregon public schools. The audits are expected to find areas where schools can save money, as well as boost public trust in how tax dollars are spent. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with Chalkboard president Sue Hildick.
6/11/2007
Listen

Study: Past Salvage Logged Areas Burn Hot
A new study on the 2002 Biscuit Fire says the most severe burns were in areas that had previously been salvage logged and replanted. Oregon State University and Forest Service researchers found that areas allowed to regenerate naturally experienced less severe burns ...
6/11/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank Lang remembers a herpetology trip where his students captured the ellusive Pacific ringneck snake, and then did something even more unnerving ... lost it. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
6/8/2007
Listen

'Physics, that's the thing that I love to do ...'
Summer vacation is just around the corner. And for some students in local schools, that means a long flight home. Today in our series on international students, we meet Ahmed Khalid, a Jordanian student at Ashland High School.
6/8/2007
Listen

Cougar Hunting Bill on its Way to Becoming Law
Southern Oregon conservation groups are calling a bill approved by the state Senate today “barbaric.” The bill allows the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife to deputize hunters, and allow them to kill cougars using dogs. JPR's Jessica Robinson has more ...
6/8/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Burned Hand' by Diana Coogle
Even teachers make mistakes. Commentator Diana Coogle reminisces about a high school chemistry experiment gone painfully wrong.
Author Diana Coogle spends part of every week at the University of Oregon studying for a Ph.D. in English.
6/7/2007
Listen

Harmonizers Pass Music to the Next Generation
The Rogue Valley Harmonizers first started competing in barbershop quartet competitions in 1939. Now, in addition to singing, the current group of about 40 men provides financial assistance for music in local schools. JPR's Bob Binnewies speaks with the director Don Meeker.
6/7/2007
Listen

In Salem, Beer Tax Hops Along
If you buy a bottle of beer in Oregon, you pay an extra nickel as a deposit. You might soon have to fork over another nickel. This one would be a tax. That’s if some state lawmakers get their way. They put the proposal in play this week. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
6/7/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Scratch Cake' by Paula Bandy
We should warn you: this story may cause spontaneous salivation. Commentator Paula Bandy is a big believer in chocolate cake ... especially the kind that's made at home. Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
6/6/2007
Listen

'Elephant Man' Goes to Heart of Victorian Icon
You might think a play about the Elephant Man would require some heavy prosthetics. Not in Oregon Stage Works' production. In fact, the actor who plays the lead has worked as a model. JPR's Jessica Robinson asks director Peter Alzado about the portrayal of the Elephant Man's deformity.
6/6/2007
Listen

Family Leave Could Come With Some Cash
In Oregon many people don’t take family leave because they can’t afford to give up their paycheck. Since 2004, California has had a paid family leave law. Now, lawmakers in Oregon are considering a similar plan. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
6/6/2007
Listen

Oregon Governor Signs Renewable Energy Mandate
Oregon’s Governor calls it the most significant environmental and economic legislation in Oregon in more than 30 years. The bill he signed today requires electric companies to get more of their energy from renewable sources. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
6/6/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'In the Twilight Zone' Judy Ticehurst
Congress has passed a war-funding bill that includes a one-year extension of timber payments. But it won’t be enough to pull Jackson County out of the strange dimension commentator Judy Ticehurst says the county has fallen into.
6/5/2007
Listen

'The food, it was the most difficult thing ...'
For 35 years, Southern Oregon University and the Universidad de Guanajuato in Mexico have been exchanging students and faculty. Today, as our series on international students continues, we meet Jorge Tovar of Guanajuato. (Interview by Bob Davy)
6/5/2007
Listen

Oregon Bill Aims to Reduce Black Plumes
Diesel engines carry 94 percent of the freight in this country because they're powerful, durable and relatively energy-efficient. But they also pollute. Oregon's House of Representatives has unanimously passed a bill to curb this pollution. JPR's Julia Sommer has more.
6/5/2007
Listen

The Life Vest’s Struggle to Win Hearts and Minds
We all know personal flotation devices save lives. So why do so many of us still refuse to wear them?  Coeur d’Alene Correspondent Elizabeth Wynne Johnson went to a busy boat launch to ask around.
6/4/2007
Listen

California Warms Up to Nuclear Power
In the face of climate change, low emissions producing nuclear power is getting a second look, even in California, where a moratorium on new nuclear power plants has put a lid on the industry for thirty years. Amy Standen of the California Report has this story.
6/4/2007
Listen

Legislators Light the Midnight Oil
Legislative sessions in Oregon and California are nearing a close, and there's still lots of bills to sort through. First, Marianne Russ reports from Sacramento on what lawmakers call the legislative "finals week." Then, Chris Lehman looks at what will keep Salem lawmakers busy.
6/4/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
They may be crafty and cute, but Frank says raccoons are a critter best discouraged from coming around. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
6/1/2007
Listen

Blood Sweat and Tears ... as Choir Music?
Choral groups around the country have performed sheet music with the name Kirby Shaw at the top. Shaw, who lives just outside of Ashland, has become one of the leading composers and arrangers of jazz and pop vocal music. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talks with Shaw about the upcoming concert of his own choir, the Jefferson State Choral Coalition.
6/1/2007
Listen

Oregon Group Says 'Dr. Death' Makes a Case for Law
Jack Kevorkian was released from prison today, bringing renewed attention to the only place where assisted suicide is legal -- Oregon. JPR's Jessica Robinson asks Compassion & Choices executive director George Eighmey about the PR challenges "Dr. Death" poses and the role he played in bringing end-of-life issues to national attention.
6/1/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Meat' by Diana Coogle
Maintaining our health sometimes requires making lifestyle changes. Commentator Diana Coogle struggled to make a major, doctor recommended dietary change: eating meat. Author Diana Coogle is studying for a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon.
5/31/2007
Listen

Redding Looks for Place for Property of Homeless
When the cops clear out a homeless camp, what happens to the belongings of the homeless? That’s the question the city of Redding is trying to answer. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with Bill Price with the Continuum of Care Public Safety Committee about the debate.
5/31/2007
Listen

Salem Committees Separate Wheat from Chaff
There's only a month left before the Oregon legislative session is set to adjourn, and lawmakers still have a lot to do. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with Salem correspondent Chris Lehman about the deadline today that will determine which bills make it to the floor.
5/31/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Spending Time' by John Fisher-Smith
Retirement isn't as care-free as it might sound. John Fisher-Smith says he may not have a "job" in the traditional sense, but he still has to keep careful track of his time. Ashland writer John Fisher-Smith is looking forward to publication of a collection of his radio commentaries.
5/30/2007
Listen

Family Revives the Ellis Island of the Northwest
Between 1899 and 1938, nearly 100-thousand immigrants passed through the port of entry at Astoria, Ore. As Tom Banse reports, the current owners say their nearly forgotten slice of immigration history can shed light on our current immigration debate.
5/30/2007
Listen

Trails in Klamath Basin Showcase Feathered Fauna
Bird trails have been established in the Klamath Basin to take advantage of one of the great bird habitats of North America. JPR's Bob Binnewies talks with Ashley Dayer of the Klamath Bird Observatory about the trails and how they can be used by local science classes.
5/30/2007
Listen

Rural Counties Adopt Code of the West
Some rural counties want to help newcomers from the city prepare for dusty roads, farm aromas and spotty cell phone service. So they’ve published what’s become known as the “Code of the West.” Correspondent Cathy Duchamp reports.
5/29/2007
Listen

Proposed 'Point System' Has Immigrants Struggling
Congress is debating a plan that would turn the current immigration system on its head. Tara Siler of the California Report found out how the plan’s complicated point system is going over with businesses and immigrant’s rights groups in California.
5/29/2007
Listen

'Hunger Knows No Season'
Hunger gets a lot of play in the news around the holidays, but it doesn’t go away the rest of the year. In fact, in some ways, the need may be greater during the summer. JPR's Jessica Robinson checks in on the status of Jackson County's food banks with Vicki Penny of ACCESS, Inc.
5/29/2007
Listen

Japanese Translators Remember WWII
As a nation of immigrants, war can be complicated for Americans whose family heritage is linked to a country we’re fighting. This Memorial Day, we visit the remnants of a top-secret language school in California where Japanese Americans were trained to be translators in WWII. Mina Kim of the California Report has this story.
5/28/2007
Listen

GPS Helps Fire Crews Cut Through the Smoke
Fire season kicked off last week with a 730-acre blaze in Northern California. Despite some remote and rugged terrain, crews contained the fire with the help of the Global Positioning System. As JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports, GPS technology is changing the way fires are fought.
5/28/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
You know all those Latin names you had to memorize in botany class? On Nature Notes, Frank Lang pays tribute to the man we have to thank for that. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
5/25/2007
Listen

Cascade-Siskiyou Monument Turns 7
It was seven years ago this June that Bill Clinton created the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in Southern Oregon. Advocates say, despite a presidential proclamation, it's still at risk. JPR's Bob Binnewies talks with David Willis of the Soda Mountain Wilderness Council.
5/25/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Eggs' by Diana Coogle
U.S. consumers are taking a closer look at their food, they're buying more organic and locally grown produce. Commentator Diana Coogle's anecdotal evidence suggests local produce tastes better, too.
Author Diana Coogle spends part of every week at the University of Oregon studying for a Ph.D. in English.
5/24/2007
Listen

'I felt like it helps me to grow more ...'
International programs give foreign students a chance to learn about the U.S., and U.S. campuses a chance to learn about other countries. We asked international students at Southern Oregon University to talk about their experience here and play some music from back home. Today we meet German grad student Sabine Steichele.
5/24/2007
Listen

Enviros, Loggers Try New Approach... Collaboration
Loggers and environmentalists working together? These unlikely collaborators have come up with a plan to that could reduce fire danger in Southern Oregon, improve forests, and help timber companies. The plan uses the thing they could agree on: small trees. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with Dave Schott of the Southern Oregon Timber Industry Association.
5/24/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Drive Me Crazy' Madeleine DeAndreis
You'd think teachers would look forward to the final weeks of class. No so, according to commentator Madeleine DeAndreis. She says that's because teachers know this is a dangerous time of year for their students. Madeleine DeAndreis is a teacher living in Siskiyou County.
5/23/2007
Listen

NW Hydropower Could Juice Plug-In Car Development
A coalition of utilities and local governments hopes the Northwest can become a development hub for hybrid electric cars by taking advantage of the region's cheap hydropower. Correspondent Tom Banse reports from Wenatchee, Wash.
5/23/2007
Listen

Nature as Antidote to Childhood Obesity
The federal government thinks public land can play a part in the fight against childhood obesity. Agencies have launched efforts to get more kids out hiking and camping in national forests and parks. JPR’s Valerie Ing-Miller talks with Whiskeytown National Recreation Area Superintendent Jim Milestone about "Waterfall Week."
5/23/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Dial Tone' by Judy Ticehurst
You might think a dial tone is just white noise, but it’s a comforting sound to commentator Judy Ticehurst. She’s been noticing that such tones are on their way out ... both at the end of phones, and in nature. Judy Ticehurst is a writer living in Medford.
5/22/2007
Listen

Star-Crossed Lovers, Amid Middle East Violence
Shakespeare’s "Romeo and Juliet" may be a classic love story -- even the classic love story –- but really, who has family feuds any more? A new production at Southern Oregon University brings the plot a little closer to home by placing the star-crossed lovers in the Middle East. JPR’s Bob Davy talks with director Stephany Smith-Pearson about what this setting does for the play, and the audience.
5/22/2007
Listen

Blind and Deaf School Merger Worries Educators
A plan in Oregon to move the School for the Blind to the campus of the School for the Deaf is facing fierce opposition from parents and teachers. JPR’s Jessica Robinson talks with Charleen Hoiland, a library media specialist at the School for the Deaf, who says the state isn't recognizing the differences between deaf and blind cultures.
5/22/2007
Listen

New Sanctuary Movement Combats Breakup of Families
As federal agents have stepped up enforcement of immigration laws, places of worship around the country are forming a "new sanctuary movement." Organizers say the government is separating parents and children. Rob Schmitz of the California Report has this story.
5/21/2007
Listen

Grocers Say Bottle Bill Update Should be Canned
Oregon lawmakers are on the verge of adding water bottles to the list of items that require buyers to fork over a nickel deposit. But the move has generated considerable opposition from the grocery industry. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
5/21/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
With honeybees suffering from a mysterious plight and researchers looking for reasons, Frank Lang wonders what we might have to give up for the bee's pollination power.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
5/18/2007
Listen

Inside the Volcano: Slow Brewing Mystery Stew
Mount St. Helens blew its top 27 years ago today. A plume of ash and steam hasn't burst from the volcano in well over a year now. But the lava dome in the crater continues to grow slowly and steadily. Tom Banse reports Mount St. Helens presents something of a scientific puzzle.
5/18/2007
Listen

Bringing the Hustle and Bustle Back to Main Street
Go to the local historical society in most cities, and you’ll find old photographs of a bustling main street. Many cities are trying to bring that downtown bustle back. This week, the city of Roseburg got some ideas for its downtown. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with urban planner Jason Graf of the Portland firm Crandall Arambula.
5/18/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Libraries and Immigrants' by Coogle
Voters in Southern Oregon this week decided a hike in property taxes wasn’t the answer to the financial crisis in timber country. That means no libraries in Josephine and Jackson County. Commentator Diana Coogle was recently at a library in Portland, and wonders what closed libraries will mean for the immigrant population.
Author Diana Coogle spends part of every week at the University of Oregon studying for a Ph.D. in English.
5/17/2007
Listen

Peace Choir Sends Message Through Song
Some people talk about world peace – others sing about it. This weekend, the 140-voice Rogue Valley Peace Choir is performing a program of songs in Ashland and Medford meant to advocate for peace, and other ideals. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talked with peace choir co-founder Linda Gail Campbell, and has this preview.
5/17/2007
Listen

Straight from the Farrier's Mouth
Technology is changing the skills required for most jobs ... but not all. JPR’s Bob Binnewies interviews a Rogue Valley man who’s profession hasn’t changed a whole lot in the last century. Robert Robinson is a farrier, the guy who shoes horses.
5/17/2007
Listen

Josephine County Libraries Close
Josephine County is following Jackson County and is shutting its public library system. A levy to fund public services in the county was defeated Tuesday by voters, and without federal timber payments, the county has to direct scarce funds to other, essential services, like public safety ...
5/17/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Thunderstorms' by Paula Bandy
The season of thunder and lightning is starting in our region. And if a thunderstorm is brewing, commentator Paula Bandy wants a front-row seat.
Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
5/16/2007
Listen

Libraries Ask 'What Now?'
Jackson County librarians hoped a levy on the May ballot would re-open the 15-branch library system. But county voters soundly rejected the measure. JPR’s Jessica Robinson visits the central library in Medford, where a skeleton crew is still doing up-keep. Jessica talks with interim director Ted Stark about the levy’s failure and what happens next.
5/16/2007
Listen

Cash-Strapped Timber Counties Reject Tax Hikes
Voters in Southern Oregon gave a resounding "No" yesterday to hikes in property taxes. The failure of four levies creates an uncertain future for cash-strapped timber counties. In Jackson County, it means public libraries will be closed indefinitely. JPR's Jessica Robinson reports.
5/16/2007
Listen

'Life is an every day challenge in Africa...'
This term, there are 76 students from 13 foreign countries on the Southern Oregon University campus. We’ve invited several international students to the JPR studios to talk about their experience here and share some of the music from their homeland. Today’s guest is a Congolese computer science student.
5/15/2007
Listen

Energy Solutions in 3rd World Can Work at Home
In this country, when we want to cook or heat our homes, we can assume the energy we need will be available at our fingertips. But energy is a struggle in other parts of the world, as Richard Stanely knows. He's president of the Legacy Foundation and has spent much of his career in Africa helping to solve energy problems there. JPR's Bob Binnewies asks Stanley about solutions that could work in the U.S. too.
5/15/2007
Listen

Sunny Revenue Forecast Means Boost for Higher Ed
Oregon lawmakers learned today they’ll have more money to spend than previously thought as they enter the final weeks of the session. The consensus seems to be that most of the extra money will go to the state’s universities and community colleges. Chris Lehman reports.
5/15/2007
Listen

Ashland Wakes Up to Artists' 'Peace Fence'
This past weekend, there was a Mother's Day surprise in Ashland -- a "Peace Fence" by the railroad tracks. Different artists created panels on the theme of peace, and put them up in the night. JPR's Kay Stein was there, and she brings us this story ...
5/14/2007
Listen

Timber Counties Turn to Voters for Funds
Congress is once again working towards renewing a subsidy program for timber dependent counties. The U.S. House passed a one-year extension last week. The Senate is expected to take up the issue soon. But some northwest counties say they can’t afford to wait any longer. They’re turning to their voters. Correspondent Chris Lehman has more.
5/14/2007
Listen

National Water Tasters Give Mt. Shasta a Nod
If wine connoisseurs head to Napa, water connoisseurs, apparently, should go to Mount Shasta. The California town's water, which is piped untreated from the springs to the faucet, was recently deemed among the tastiest in the nation by discerning palates at the National Rural Water Association. JPR’s Valerie Ing-Miller talks with Mount Shasta public works director Rod Brian and utilities supervisor Gary Moll.
5/14/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
The horse has a status in America unlike any other animal. But Frank Lang worries the horse's romanticized image has lead to mismanagement of the wild horses that roam the West.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
5/11/2007
Listen

Traditional American Songs for a Hundred Voices
Every Tuesday night in a church in Ashland, over a hundred people get together to sing. They’re called the Siskiyou Singers and lately they’ve have been practicing choral versions of some classic American songs. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talked with director Dave Marston about the upcoming performance.
5/11/2007
Listen

Life Imitates Art, As Women Stand Around Globe
This Mother's Day, women at more than 2,800 sites in 72 countries will stand silently for five minutes at 1 p.m. These "Standing Women" are re-creating what happened in a children's book called "The Great Silent Grandmother Gathering," by Ashland author Sharon Mehdi. JPR's Jessica Robinson finds out how a story about two grandmothers trying to save the world came to life.
5/11/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Commuting' by Diana Coogle
The rising price of gasoline doesn't seem to be halting Americans' driving habits. In fact, commentator Diana Coogle is disturbed by how much of our time we're willing to spend behind the wheel.
Author Diana Coogle spends part of every week at the University of Oregon studying for a Ph.D. in English.
5/10/2007
Listen

Moms of Multiples Converge
It used to be that twins were rare. Triplets even more so. But over the last 25 years, the rate of twin births is up almost 70 percent. Correspondent Elizabeth Wynne Johnson recently spent time with a group of women who share the singular experience of raising multiples.
5/10/2007
Listen

Rule Change May Mean Toxins Go Under the Radar
For the past two decades, U.S. factories have been required to provide the Environmental Protection Agency with detailed information about any toxic chemicals they release into the air and water. But the Bush Administration recently relaxed those requirements. That means, in California alone, as much as 600,000 pounds of toxic chemicals could go under-reported this year. David Gorn of the California Report has more.
5/10/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Information Daze' John Fisher-Smith
Commentator John Fisher-Smith tries to find the time that technology is supposedly saving him.
Ashland writer John Fisher-Smith is looking forward to publication of a collection of his radio commentaries called “Opening My Eyes.”
5/9/2007
Listen

Out-of-State Gay Donors Targeted NW Races
A network of wealthy, out-of-state gay rights advocates targeted legislative campaigns in Washington and Oregon last year, pouring money into swing district races. This coordinated effort went undetected until now, six months after the election. Olympia Correspondent Austin Jenkins has this report.
5/9/2007
Listen

Gay Rights Bills a 'Pandora's Box' Says Local GOP
Oregon governor Ted Kulongoski signed two gay rights bills into law today. Bryan Platt, chairman of the Jackson County Republican Party, talks with JPR’s Jessica Robinson about the problems he sees for Oregon in the fine print of the new laws.
5/9/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Fawn Lily Epitaph' by Judy Ticehurst
A popular place for day hikes in Southern Oregon was recently the site of a tragic accident. A young man fell from a cliff at Table Rocks and died. Commentator Judy Ticehurst recently hiked there, and is able to find a little comfort in knowing the beauty the man must have seen that day.
Judy Ticehurst is a writer living in Medford.
5/8/2007
Listen

Irrigation Canal Becomes Mico-Hydropower Plant
When you think of hydropower, you probably think of dams along the Klamath or Columbia rivers. But one of the newest hydropower projects in the region is in an irrigation ditch. Correspondent Chris Lehman has the story of how an engineering problem was turned into an environmentally friendly solution.
5/8/2007
Listen

Museum Seeks Potato Paraphernalia
OK, so you probably don’t usually give much thought to potatoes, but there have been generations of Klamath Basin farmers that did. The Klamath County Museums want to share some of that history through a new exhibit. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with museums manager Todd Kepple about what you can learn about the region through tools and burlap bags.
5/8/2007
Listen

Oregon House Releases the Hounds
Lawmakers say Oregon’s cougar population has exploded since voters banned most hound hunting of the big cats. They voted today to allow the state to recruit volunteer cougar hunters who could use dogs. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
5/8/2007
Listen

A Tale of a Town and its Grouch
It’s campaign season for a tiny town in northeast Washington. At stake is a coveted title. The Grouch of Kettle Falls. Correspondent Elizabeth Wynne Johnson has this story on the city Grouch race and why it may be good for business.
5/7/2007
Listen

Abalone Season Claims Five Lives
California’s red abalone are a culinary delicacy, and folks come from far and wide to hunt for them along the state's rocky shores. But it's a dangerous sport. This year, the hunt for abalone has already claimed five lives. What’s to blame? Colin Berry of the California Report headed to Mendocino County to find out.
5/7/2007
Listen

Getting Health Care, 100 Miles from a Hospital
There’s a lot of discussion around the state capitol these days about improving access to health care. But universal health insurance is meaningless if you can’t get to a doctor. Correspondent Chris Lehman visited a clinic in rural central Oregon to find out what it’s like to stay healthy when your neighbors are sagebrush and jackrabbits.
5/7/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
It's a Guinea pig, it's a jackalope ... no, it's a Patagonian cavy! Dr. Frank Lang describes the unusual animal he spotted on his recent trip in South America. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
5/4/2007
Listen

Redding Teens Swoon Over Conrad Birdie
Shasta High School's spring musical will be one of their biggest this year with more than 100 teen actors, singers and musicians in a production of ‘Bye Bye Birdie.” The director and some of the cast members dropped by our studios in Redding. JPR’s Valerie Ing-Miller first talked with senior Brian Livingston, who plays the lead.
5/4/2007
Listen

SOU Students Lay Out Their Green for Green Power
Southern Oregon University in Ashland announced a new milestone this week. It will become the first campus in the state to offset all its power with energy from renewable sources. JPR's Jessica Robinson interviews Laura Rost, the environmental studies major who spearheaded the green energy fee campaign, and successfully convinced students to pay for green power.
5/4/2007
Listen

Interview with Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger
This week, California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger granted a rare one-on-one interview to Capital Public Radio in Sacramento. The governor explained his plan for making health care reform stick and who he’s watching in the race for the Republican presidential nomination.
5/3/2007
Listen

Higher Education Feels Budget Pinch
Oregon’s higher education community says getting a degree in the state has become too expensive. They want lawmakers to dramatically increase the amount of money slated to go to the state’s public universities. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
5/3/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Fascination' by Madeleine DeAndreis
It’s prom season, and in movies about high school, this is where the girl finally gets the boy. Of course, most people don’t experience high school the way John Hughes envisioned it. Commentator Madeleine DeAndreis certainly didn’t. But senior prom did turn out to be memorable anyway, thanks to her mother ...
Madeleine DeAndreis is a writer and now a high school teacher living in Siskiyou County.
5/2/2007
Listen

The Case of the Disappearing Ice
Northwest glaciers are melting at an accelerating pace, according to the latest monitoring studies. Global warming is a likely culprit. Correspondent Tom Banse has more from a science conference in Tacoma.
5/2/2007
Listen

Callahan's Lodge Rises Slowly, Surely From Ashes
Ron and Donna Bergquist were starting to think about retirement last fall when their business, the beloved Callahan's Lodge, burned down. So, they're beginning again. JPR's Jessica Robinson gets an update from Ron Bergquist on the rebuilding of the regional landmark.
5/2/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'The Closing of the Libraries' Trail
Before the Jackson County libraries closed last month, Ashland commentator Pepper Trail visited his local branch to drop off some books. While he was there, Pepper was compelled to sit down at a desk and write about what it means to shut the doors on libraries. Today, he reads what he wrote that day.
5/1/2007
Listen

Mozart's 'Magic Flute' Opens in Rogue Valley
Rogue Opera celebrates its 30th anniversary this year. On Friday, the opera opens “The Magic Flute," a major undertaking for a rural non-profit. JPR's Bob Davy talks with artistic director Willene Gunn about the production, and about the fanaticism opera continues to incite.
5/1/2007
Listen

Dems Aim for Better Image with Religious Voters
The Democratic National Committee has hired an outreach director in California to visit congregations and discuss those two things you’re never supposed to talk about: politics and religion. Stephanie Martin of the California Report finds out how the Democrats are impacting people of faith, and how religion could impact the party.
5/1/2007
Listen

Immigration Rally Draws Thousands to Salem
People across the country held rallies in support of immigration rights today. That included more than a thousand people at the Oregon capital. For about three hours, marchers chanted and held signs demanding more rights for people who have entered the country illegally ...
5/1/2007
Listen

Poetry Month Series: Judson Hyatt
Over the last few weeks, the Jefferson Daily has been airing readings by local poets in honor of National Poetry Month. It’s a chance to hear a form of writing not often heard on the airwaves. For our final reading, we’ll hear a piece about the airwaves by Medford poet Judson Hyatt. It's called "Disc Jockey."
4/30/2007
Listen

Conservationists Say Owl Plan Shirks Science
A new spotted owl recovery plan calls for killing another species of owl ... but that's not the controversial part. Conservationists, including members of the federal team charged with coming up with the plan, say the Bush administration overrode recommendations to push through a plan that will do little to save the Northern spotted owl and could ease old growth protections.
 
First, Correspondent Tom Banse reports on the new plan. Then, JPR's Jessica Robinson interviews recovery team member Dominick Della Sala, who says he witnessed political interference by bureaucrats.
 
To read the spotted owl recovery plan, click here.
4/30/2007
Listen

Poetry Month Series: Julie Rogers
In honor of National Poetry Month, the Jefferson Daily running a series of poems by writers from the region. It’s a chance to highlight an art form not often heard on the air. Today’s reading by Southern Oregon writer and caregiver Julie Rogers is titled "Forgiveness."
4/27/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
The sun sure is nice, but Frank Lang, ever the realist, describes four skin irregularities that point to melanoma.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
4/27/2007
Listen

The Sounds of War, as Interpreted by Haydn
This weekend, the Rogue Valley Chorale is reviving Joseph Haydn's “Mass in a Time of War.” Haydn used the tympani in this 1796 mass to symbolize the march of Napoleon’s troops. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talked with Rogue Valley Chorale conductor Lynn Sjoland about the performance.
4/27/2007
Listen

Josephine County Businesses Give Levy The OK
A property tax levy on the Josephine County ballot was endorsed by an unexpected source this week: the chamber of commerce. The levy would fill the budget hole left in public safety when a federal subsidy expired. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with chamber of commerce head Jon Jordan about the decision to support the tax hike.
4/27/2007
Listen

Poetry Month Series: Edie Berry
April is National Poetry Month, an occasion to celebrate the art of getting a lot of meaning into a few words. Each day, the Jefferson Daily is highlighting a poet from this region. Today we hear a piece called "Thanksgiving 1952" by Central Point writer Edie Berry.
4/26/2007
Listen

Salem Showdown Over State Police Funding Plan
The gaps in state police coverage in Oregon are big enough to, well, drive a speeding truck through. There are hours in the early morning when no Oregon state troopers are out on the highways. Oregon lawmakers are trying to restore funding for round the clock patrols. But a Republican plan hit a wall yesterday. Chris Lehman reports from Salem.
4/26/2007
Listen

'Wild Trees' Explores Redwoods and Their Fanatics
Any school kid knows the redwood is California's state tree. But there is so much more to redwoods than that. In "The Wild Trees," Richard Preston uncovers the hidden canopy of California's redwoods and the small group of people obsessed with studying them. Richard Preston sat down with Scott Shafer of the California Report.
4/26/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Middle-earth of Cyberspace' Bandy
Paula Bandy recently took an unwelcome trip to a parallel universe -- the one that exists inside her home computer. Today, she describes the treachery one must fight there. Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
4/25/2007
Listen

Sacramento Tackles Ailments of Health Care System
The healthcare debate is heating up this week at the California Capitol. A committee has approved a proposal by the assembly speaker and another is set to consider a plan from the Senate leader Wednesday. From Sacramento, Marianne Russ reports.
4/25/2007
Listen

Poetry Month Series: Nancy J. Bringhurst
April is National Poetry Month and the Jefferson Daily taking the opportunity to highlight an art form not often heard on the air. Each day, we're running work by a local poet. Today’s poem is "Cougar Chutzpah" by Nancy Bringhurst, who lives on Mount Ashland. In this selection, Bringhurst writes about one of the hazards of rural living.
4/24/2007
Listen

Oregon Mulls Options for Timber Counties
The end of federal payments to timber dependent counties has largely been a showdown between Congress and county governments. It’s unclear what role, if any, state government should take as counties slash services and lay off workers. Local officials in Oregon turned to state lawmakers for help recently. Chris Lehman has more from Coos County.
4/24/2007
Listen

Poetry Month Series: Judson Hyatt
Today we continue our poetry series in honor of National Poetry Month. Each day, the Jefferson Daily is highlighting a poet from the region. Today’s reading is by Judson Hyatt, a pharmacist in Medford. During a bout of the flu over the winter, Hyatt tried to think of a stretch of the Oregon coast near Bandon, a place that holds special meaning to him.
4/23/2007
Listen

Rented Bees Under-Appreciated But Vital to NW
How's this for a career -- following the blossoms around the West? Commercial beekeepers provide the air power to pollinate literally billions of dollars worth of crops. Lately, they also wage a constant battle to stay ahead of mites and disastrous hive diseases. Correspondent Tom Banse reports on an under-appreciated but vital cog in Northwest agriculture.
4/23/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Today, Frank Lang considers who to place his bet on in Man v. Nature. Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
4/20/2007
Listen

Poetry Month Series: Patricia Sempowich
We continue our poetry series today. In honor of national poetry month, the Jefferson Daily is highlighting local poets. Today’s reading is by Patricia Sempowich, a retired Southern Oregon University English professor living in Ashland. In this poem, "Dearest Richard," Sempowich speaks to a cousin she was close to as a kid. But over time, they lost touch.
4/20/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Teaching Grammar' by Diana Coogle
The topic of grammar usually produces strong reactions in people. They either love it or hate it. Diana Coogle is one who loves it, and she takes issue with a recent academic trend.
Author Diana Coogle spends part of every week at the University of Oregon studying for a Ph.D. in English.
4/19/2007
Listen

Poetry Month Series: Joyce Epstein
April is National Poetry Month. In honor of that, the Jefferson Daily is highlighting local poets. Today, Ashland writer Joyce Epstein reads a poem about her father called "Inheritance."
4/19/2007
Listen

Striking Oil in Winery Waste
An enterprising Northwest couple is striking oil in other people's garbage. The garbage in this case is the tons of crushed stems, skins and grape seeds generated by the region's booming wine industry. Correspondent Tom Banse reports from Prosser, Wash., on the value that might hide in those winemaking leftovers.
4/19/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Easter Down South' John Fisher-Smith
John Fisher-Smith comes from a place where he feels there's a lot of understanding of the dangers of global warming. So, when he ventured into Southern California recently, he was surprised to find seemingly heedless energy use.
Ashland writer John Fisher-Smith is looking forward to publication of a collection of his radio commentaries called “Opening My Eyes.”
4/18/2007
Listen

Poetry Month Series: Michael Jenkins
April is National Poetry Month, and over the next few weeks on the Jefferson Daily, we’ll be highlighting local poets. Today’s reading is "Midpoint" by Michael Jenkins of Grants Pass.
4/18/2007
Listen

Tax Man Knocks at Door of Cannabis Clubs
In Sacramento, state officials on the hunt for new revenue sources are talking about collecting sales tax from medical marijuana clubs. Some clubs worry about the position that could put them in with the federal government. Scott Shafer of the California Report has more.
4/18/2007
Listen

Oregon House Approves Pair of Gay Rights Bills
It took three hours of floor debate Tuesday, and there was a sense that something big was happening. In the end, the Oregon House approved two gay rights bills. One measure bans discrimination based on sexual orientation. The other creates same-sex domestic partnerships. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
4/18/2007
Listen

What's a Stageplay Without the Stage?
Living near theaters doesn’t guarantee you stage time. Even in Ashland, it’s tough getting a new play produced. So, local playwrights are joining together to showcase their work. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with playwrights Ruth Wire and Phil Loveless about an upcoming reading of local plays, and what happens to a play when it’s performed.
4/17/2007
Listen

Coming to an iPod Near You ... Oregon Republicans
Politicians have long complained that the media twists their words. Some lawmakers in Oregon’s capitol are taking advantage of a new technology to bypass traditional gatekeepers ... people like our own Salem correspondent, Chris Lehman.
4/17/2007
Listen

Oregon Bill Would Cut Government Gobbledygook
Government documents are famous for their power to make your eyes glaze over. Supporters of a "plain language" bill in Oregon say they have the antidote. JPR's Jessica Robinson reports.
4/16/2007
Listen

Pacific Northwest, the New Winemaking Frontier
California is still the leader in U.S. winemaking -- it’s home to almost half the country’s wineries. But California’s northern neighbors aren’t just a drop in the bucket any more. Correspondent Tom Banse reports on the Northwest's wine industry from an opening in Washington.
4/13/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
With mushrooming season here, Frank explains how to tell a bona fide morel from a dangerous imposter.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
4/13/2007
Listen

More Library Closures Loom in Southern Oregon
If two county levies don't pass in May, there could be no public libraries in a 4,000-square mile section of Southern Oregon. In order to pay for law enforcenment, Josephine County might have to follow Jackson County and shut its library system. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with Josephine County library manager Cessa Vichi.
4/12/2007
Listen

Extended Deployments Stress the Home Front
Thousands of Northwest military families are getting unwelcome news. The Army is adding three months to the year-long tours of soldiers in Iraq. Correspondent Tom Banse has reaction from Fort Lewis, Wash.
4/12/2007
Listen

Birth Certificate Bill Worries Pro-Choice Groups
A bill in California to provide parents of stillborn babies with a special type of birth certificate has hit a major snag. At a committee hearing Wednesday no vote was taken, in part because some said the bill could have unintended consequences. From Sacramento, Jenny O’Mara reports.
4/12/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Spring Snow' by Diana Coogle
A recent surprise spring snow prompted Diana Coogle to explore what the poets have said about the oft tumultuous month of April.
Author Diana Coogle spends part of every week at the University of Oregon studying for a Ph.D. in English.
4/12/2007
Listen

Noises On
The new exhibit at the ScienceWorks museum in Ashland is meant more for your ears than for your eyes. It’s called, simply “Noise!” The exhibit helps visitors understand how sound works and how we hear sound. JPR's Bob Binnewies visited ScienceWorks to take a look -– or rather, a listen.
4/11/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'A Wrong Turn' by Madeleine DeAndreis
Madeleine DeAndreis says she still trusts a local over a computer when it comes to giving directions.
Madeleine DeAndreis is a writer and teacher living in Siskiyou County.
4/11/2007
Listen

Atkinson Proposes Velodrome in Southern Oregon
Southern Oregon is a hotbed of bicycle riders, racers and builders. Now, state senator Jason Atkinson (R-Central Point) has introduced legislation to build a velodrome in Southern Oregon. JPR's Julia Sommer has more.
4/10/2007
Listen

Oregon Conservationists Attack Cougar Hunting Bill
Cougar advocates say a bill in the Oregon House would roll back the state’s voter-passed ban on hunting the big cats with dogs. Fish and wildlife officials want to deputize hunters so they can help keep the cougar population down. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with Brian Vincent of the conservation group Big Wildlife.
4/10/2007
Listen

Aerial Tsunami Warnings Get a Test-Run on Coast
The West Coast has hundreds of miles of beaches and just a smattering of tower mounted tsunami warning sirens. The volunteer Civil Air Patrol is testing an earsplitting airborne loudspeaker to potentially fill some of the gaps. Correspondent Tom Banse took a listen.
4/10/2007
Listen

Jackson County's 15 Libraries Shut Their Doors
All fifteen public libraries in Jackson County closed their doors Friday, with no date for re-opening in sight. County officials say they can’t afford to operate the libraries with out a federal timber subsidy. JPR’s Jessica Robinson was at the central library in Medford during its final hours of business and has this story.
4/9/2007
Listen

'Single Largest Library Closure in the U.S.'
All 15 branches of the Jackson County library system close their doors today. The county says it doesn’t have enough money to keep them open, now that a federal subsidy is gone. JPR’s Jessica Robinson interviews American Library Association president Leslie Burger about her impression of the situation, and what other libraries have done in the face of funding cuts.
4/6/2007
Listen

'Library Books Saved My Life'
For Meghan O’Flaherty, the closing of the Jackson County public libraries today will be deeply personal. In today's commentary, she explains libraries have not only been her life’s work, but her savior.
Meghan O’Flaherty is the Jackson County headquarters library manager. You can share your own library story here.
4/6/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
We’ve been hearing a lot about the disappearance of honey bees. Today, Dr. Frank Lang explains the science behind the headlines.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
4/6/2007
Listen

Medford Publisher Celebrates Independents
Morgan and Chase Publishing is trying to give the little guy some exposure. The publisher puts out a collection of coffee table books called the "Treasures Of" series that highlight independently owned businesses around the country. JPR's Bob Binnewies talks with owner Bill Faubian and president Damon Neal.
4/5/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Easter' by Diana Coogle
This Sunday, if the weather is good, children all over the region will be going on Easter egg hunts. Today, Diana Coogle reflects on the meaning of Easter, both in her childhood and now.
Author Diana Coogle spends part of every week at the University of Oregon studying for a Ph.D. in English.
4/5/2007
Listen

Last Library Standing
The library at Southern Oregon University in Ashland will soon be the last major library open in Jackson County. The county has run out of funding and will close the libraries on Friday. But as JPR's Jessica Robinson reports, university librarians say they won't be able to adequately serve the public's needs.
4/4/2007
Listen

Farmers Want More Columbia River Water
The Northwest has long tapped into the Columbia River to water its crops and quench its thirst. Now, farmers in Oregon are concerned their counterparts in Washington are gaining the upper hand. That state has embarked on a $200 million program to build and fill reservoirs with water from the Columbia. A group in Oregon has come up with its own plan to take more water from the river. It’s called the Oregon Oasis Project. Correspondent Chris Lehman has more.
4/4/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Daylight Saving Whine' by Paula Bandy
If the federal government hadn't insisted on an earlier state to daylight saving time this year, we would have "sprung forward" last weekend. Commentator Paula Bandy still hasn't quite adjusted to this change in the time change.
Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
4/4/2007
Listen

Music of the Muslim World
One of the biggest areas of conflict in Islam right now is the music people play. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talks with ethnomusicologist Sean Williams, who's giving a lecture this week in Ashland, about the fine line Islamic musicians have to walk.
4/3/2007
Listen

California Researchers Assist in Mathematical Feat
What’s bigger than Manhattan, started in California, and might explain the nature of the universe? A new mathematical discovery that’s earned a Congressional commendation. A crack team of researchers around the world solved a puzzle that has eluded mathematicians for more than a century. Peter Jon Shuler of the California Report attempts to explain it.
4/3/2007
Listen

New Fieldguide By and For the Amateur Botanist
With winter officially gone, the hills will soon be vibrant with spring color. A fieldguide called "Wildflowers of the Pacific Northwest" (Timber Press) is meant to help the amateur botanist identify some of that new growth. JPR's Bob Binnewies talks with author Phyllis Gustafson of Central Point, Ore.
4/2/2007
Listen

Little Diversity on California Bench
California is an incredibly diverse state, but if you go before a California court, you’re likely going before a white, male judge. Some legal experts say that’s a dangerous situation -– not only for minorities, but for the state’s justice system as a whole. Scott Shafer of the California Report has this story from San Francisco.
4/2/2007
Listen

Fee Plan Fuels Debate Over National Parks
The federal government is considering a proposal to raise the cost of visiting National Parks. It's added fuel to a philosophical debate brewing over the role of the parks and how to fund them. As JPR's Jessica Robinson reports, some park advocates say a plan ostensibly meant to garner money for the parks will be their downfall.
3/30/2007
Listen

Going for Baroque
The Jefferson Baroque Orchestra will recreate the music and the dance of 17th and 18th century Europe at a concert this weekend. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talks with choreographer Judy Kennedy about how they achieve historical accuracy without any visual record.
3/30/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank has returned from Patagonia. Since it's radio, you won't have to see his vacation pictures, but he does have stories to tell.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
3/30/2007
Listen

County Payments Imbedded in Controversial War Bill
An extension of the county payments program has been approved by the U.S. Senate. The problem is, the extension is in a bill that also includes a deadline for withdrawal from Iraq, and President Bush says he’ll veto the legislation. JPR’s Jessica Robinson finds out why Jackson County commissioners are optimistic anyway.
3/29/2007
Listen

Two Vets, Two Stances on Iraq War
As veterans return home and focus on putting their lives back together some go a step beyond and become activists. The two Iraq war veterans you’re about to meet have done just that. As Jenny O’Mara reports, their time in Iraq brought them to very different conclusions about the war.
3/29/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Cumberland Island' by Diana Coogle
Today, commentator Diana Coogle recalls the good times (and bad) on a barrier island off the coast of her home state, Georgia.
Author Diana Coogle spends part of every week at the University of Oregon studying for a Ph.D. in English.
3/29/2007
Listen

Oregon Considers Change to Double Majority Rule
In Salem today, legislators debated whether to change the state’s double-majority requirement on property tax increases, which voters approved in 1996. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman has more.
3/28/2007
Listen

Being the Knock at the Door
It’s the most heartbreaking news the parents or spouse of a soldier may ever hear: Their loved one has died in the line of duty. It’s also an emotional experience for the serviceman or woman who has the responsibility of delivering the message. Marianne Russ has this story on a man who’s performed the difficult duty.
3/28/2007
Listen

Taking a Bird's Eye View of the Region
The Klamath Bird Observatory monitors avian activity in Northern California and Southern Oregon and equates the findings to the health of the environment. Think of it as sort of the canary in the coal mine idea, but on a much larger scale. JPR’s Bob Binnewies talks with John Alexander, executive director of the observatory.
3/28/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Connection' by John Fisher-Smith
In today's commentary, John Fisher-Smith wonders about the mysteries of human connection.
Ashland writer John Fisher-Smith is looking forward to publication of a collection of his radio commentaries called “Opening My Eyes.”
3/28/2007
Listen

Harper Lee's Classic Comes to Life in Ashland
When Oregon Stage Works set out to do a stage version of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” the Ashland theater company knew it would present a special challenge. It's essentially a story about kids, and the play would have to be carried by some very young actors. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talks with the show’s director Peter Alzado.
3/27/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'My World' by Judy Ticehurst
It doesn’t sound so bad to have more time than you know what to do with. But as commentator Judy Ticehurst discovered that can be a scary prospect in retirement.
Judy Ticehurst is a writer living in Medford. She retired from a job as a scientific associate at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California.
3/27/2007
Listen

Reading by Ear
Blackstone Audio in Ashland has become one of the largest independent audio book producers in the country. JPR's Bob Binnewies talks with acquisitions manager Haila Williams about the growing appeal of reading a book by hearing it, and the traits Blackstone looks for in a narrator.
3/26/2007
Listen

Fear, Anger Follow Border Patrol Dragnet in NW
Earlier this month, Border Patrol agents set up a temporary checkpoint on the Olympic Peninsula. It was billed as an anti-terrorism operation. But the only people arrested were suspected illegal workers from Mexico and Guatemala. Correspondent Austin Jenkins reports.
3/23/2007
Listen

The Legacy of John Backus
Computer pioneer John Backus died in Ashland last week. Backus is famous in the computing community; he lead the development of Fortran in the '50s. JPR's Jessica Robinson asks computer science professor Pete Nordquist of Southern Oregon University to explain how Backus helped shape modern technology.
3/23/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
If you see an small, 'gator-like reptile lurking in the grass, don't try to make your pet. As Frank explains today, it's called an alligator lizard for good reason.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
3/23/2007
Listen

Oregon Legislature Issues Its Version of Budget
If they do nothing else before they go home, lawmakers have to pass a state budget. Today, the leaders of the Oregon legislature’s budget committee released their version of how they think the state should spend 15 billion dollars in public money. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
3/22/2007
Listen

Bill Bans Little-Known Hallucinogen "Salvia"
Most people know of salvia as an ornamental plant, but there’s one species of salvia that isn’t innocuous at all. A bill has been introduced in the Oregon House of Representatives to make this species illegal. Jefferson Public Radio’s Julia Sommer has more.
3/22/2007
Listen

Bates Tours State to Talk Health Care Reform
Political analysts and policymakers said this would be the year of health care reform. So far, there hasn’t been much progress. Oregon state senator Alan Bates (D-Ashland) has been holding meetings around the state to try to build some momentum. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with the local physician about his plan to overhaul the system.
3/22/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Dream Job' by Diana Coogle
The Walt Disney Company and CareerBuilder.com conducted a poll recently that indicated four out of five people in the United States are not working their "dream job." But Diana Coogle questions the premise of the poll.
Author Diana Coogle spends part of every week at the University of Oregon studying for a Ph.D. in English.
3/22/2007
Listen

Lesbian Couple Sues in Birth Certificate Dispute
A bill that would ban discrimination against gays and lesbians is halfway through the Oregon legislature after passing the Senate today. Meanwhile, a lesbian couple from Portland is suing the state because they say their rights as parents are being violated. Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
3/21/2007
Listen

Cullinan Faces Tough Decisions in New Job
Mary Cullinan was warned that her resources would be limited if she took a job in higher ed in Oregon, but she wasn't expecting a financial crisis. The president of Southern Oregon University has had to make $4 million in cuts in her first six months on the job. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with Cullinan about the changes at SOU.
3/21/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Commitment' by Madeleine DeAndreis
Madeleine DeAndreis describes the real, unromantic side of commitment.
Madeleine DeAndreis is a writer and teacher living in Siskiyou County.
3/21/2007
Listen

Bridgeview Winery Loses Case Over Salmon, Erosion
The Oregon Court of Appeals has ruled against the owner of Bridgeview Winery in a case involving how much control farmers have over streams on their property. Bridgeview’s owner says he worries the controversy has tainted the Cave Junction winery. JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports.
3/20/2007
Listen

More Vets Fill Seats at California Universities
More military veterans are attending California colleges and universities than ever before. Officials estimate more than 8,000 are enrolled around the state. As more vets return to class, schools are learning they must provide new services for this growing segment of the student population. Correspondent Ellen Ciurczak has this story.
3/20/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'The Salamanders Among Us' Will Brophy
Commentator Will Brophy is a great believer in the old adage about stopping to smell the roses –- or, to look at the amphibians, as the case may be.
Will Brophy is a retired biology and botany professor who splits his time between Santa Cruz and Shingletown, California.
3/20/2007
Listen

Oregon Considers Ban on Junk Food in Schools
Obesity is a looming health crisis in America. Some northwest lawmakers say one way to attack the problem is to get schools to stop selling junk food. But as Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman reports, getting the recipe just right for a statewide policy won’t be easy ...
3/19/2007
Listen

With Schools Study Out, Next Step is Action
Last week, Stanford University released a landmark report on the California schools system. Kathryn Baron of the California Report talks with one of the Stanford professors who worked on a study of the California schools system, and a state senator in a position to use the findings.
3/19/2007
Listen

Notes of Change
The picture we usually get of so-called “troubled teens” is from crime statistics and arrest reports. But a recent project in Ashland allowed some of these kids to tell their own stories –- through music. It was part of a treatment program for teens who have been through the Oregon court system. JPR's Jessica Robinson meets the teens who’ve learned a difficult skill at a young age: how to change.
3/16/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Today, Frank debunks some common snake myths, and explains how to tell the good guys from the rattlers.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
3/16/2007
Listen

Contraception Bill Clears Oregon House
Birth control prescriptions would be covered by more insurance plans under a measure working its way through the Oregon legislature. The House approved it today and it’s expected to pass in the Senate.  Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
3/15/2007
Listen

California Moves Up Presidential Primary
It’s official. Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger has signed legislation that will move the presidential primary in California from June to February. As Jenny O’Mara reports, the switch means 2008 will be a hectic year for local elections officials.
3/15/2007
Listen

NW Climatologists Refute Much Quoted Statistic
The snowpack in the Cascades has supposedly declined 50 percent since 1950. That alarming statistic has taken on a life of it's own in the Northwest. The problem is, some scientists say it's not accurate. But when a leading researcher tried to set the record straight, he lost a prestigious appointment. Correspondent Austin Jenkins reports.
3/15/2007
Listen

Farmers Want 'Canola-Free Zones'
Home grown fuel is all the rage in political and environmental circles. But some farmers don't want to go near it with a 10-foot pole. Actually, they'd prefer the oilseed crops stay many miles away. Correspondent Tom Banse explains why the concept of "canola-free zones" is gaining ground.
3/15/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'The Whistler' by Diana Coogle
Academia and eccentricity seem to go hand in hand. Commentator Diana Coogle is at the University of Oregon right now earning her Ph.D., and on the way to class one day, she heard a strange whistling with no one in sight.
Diana Coogle’s latest book is “An Explosion of Stars.”
3/15/2007
Listen

New Markets Expected to Sprout from Carbon Rule
California is leading the nation in efforts to fight global warming by reducing the carbon content of gasoline and diesel fuel by 10 percent. The goal is to turn the clock back to 1990 levels of greenhouse gases. Cy Musiker of the California Report has this story on how California’s regulations could change the market.
3/14/2007
Listen

Step Up to the Mic
Once a month of diverse group of about a dozen people gathers at a coffee shop to share the thing they have in common: words. They’re local writers and poets who read their work at an event called “Step Up to the Mic.” We found out what people are willing to share at the mic. (Produced by Jessica Robinson - Interviews by Bob Davy)
3/14/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Unexpected Comfort' by Paula Bandy
In today's commentary, Paula Bandy considers the unexpected comforts of winter in the Klamath Basin.
Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
3/14/2007
Listen

Commercial Stations Oppose Limits on Lottery Ads
Oregonians could be in for a lot less lottery advertising on TV. That’s if a bipartisan group of state lawmakers has its way. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
3/13/2007
Listen

Local Photo Shops in the Digital Age
Kodak recently announced it has to cut thousands of workers. People don't want film anymore -- not when they have digital cameras. The digital shift also impacts little photo shops that once developed all the local family pictures -- shops like Shasta View Gift Shoppe & Gallery, a fixture of Weed, Calif., for 61 years. JPR's Jessica Robinson interviews owner Linnč Clements about her changing role in the community.
3/13/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'One kWh At a Time' by Judy Ticehurst
We know we’ll have to make sacrifices if we’re going to do something about global warming. Today, commentator Judy Ticehurst describes the sacrifice she's made for the sake of the environment: her vanity.
Judy Ticehurst is a writer living in Medford.
3/13/2007
Listen

SOU Reveals Cuts, Geology and Geography Spared
The president of Southern Oregon University this afternoon gave the final word on where the axe will fall on SOU’s budget. It's not as bad as geology, geography and other disciplines slated to be cut had feared. However, students will no longer be able to major in German. JPR’s Jessica Robinson went to the all-campus address ...
3/12/2007
Listen

Former 'Child of the City' Heads Lassen
Mary Martin grew up in the Bay Area, and remembers heading out to Lassen Volcanic National Park for family vacations. Now, Martin is the superintendent of the park in Northern California. JPR's Bob Binnewies interviews Martin about her career and the special place she oversees.
3/12/2007
Listen

Emotions Flow 50 Years After Dam Submerges Celilo
Well over a thousand people converged on the Columbia Gorge this weekend to mark 50 years since the flooding of Celilo Falls by The Dalles Dam. Celilo was a major fishing and tribal trading center for thousands of years. Now it lies under a tame pool of slackwater. Correspondent Tom Banse was there for a commemoration that blended mourning with hope.
3/12/2007
Listen

Global Warming has a Goose Face on West Coast
For most of us, global warming is something that might affect our lives someday. But for some Northwest farmers, climate change could be nibbling at their pocketbooks right now. Snow geese from the warming Arctic are showing up in droves and eating pasture grass and crops. Correspondent Tom Banse reports.
3/9/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Tom' by Scott Smith
Exactly one year ago, Tom Fox of Christian Peacemaker Teams was killed in Iraq, after being held captive for months. Today, commentator Scott Smith remembers his friend and the mission he served.
Scott Smith lives in Grants Pass and teaches part-time at Rogue Community College. He and his wife are still part of Christian Peacemaker Teams, and hope to return to the West Bank later this year.
3/9/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
If you can shake off the creepy-crawlies, listen to this Nature Notes on identifying an odd spider that inhabits the region.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
3/9/2007
Listen

The Ones Who Stayed Behind
During World War II, thousands of Japanese Americans on the West Coast were put in internment camps -- but not all. If you lived inland, you didn't have to go. Correspondent Elizabeth Wynne Johnson has this story on what it was like for those who weren't interned, but weren't quite free either.
3/8/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'GPS' by Diana Coogle
Technology has changed the way people answer the simple question, “Where are you?” Commentator Diana Coogle describes her own attempt to answer the question on a trip through Southern Oregon ...
Diana Coogle’s latest book is “An Explosion of Stars.”
3/8/2007
Listen

Northwest Gay Rights Activists Try Two Approaches
Even though voters and the courts in the Northwest have said no to gay marriage, that's not stopping gay rights advocates. They've found a friendly audience with new Democratic majorities in Salem and in Olympia, Washington. We have correspondents in both capitols following the issue.
3/7/2007
Listen

Global Warming: A Local Issue
Global warming is expected to have different effects in different places. In that way, forest ecologist Dominick DellaSala says global warming is a local issue. DellaSala is with the National Center for Conservation Science and Policy in Ashland. JPR's Jessica Robinson asks him to outline what we might see in this part of the globe.
3/7/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Manifesto' by John Fisher-Smith
In today's commentary by John Fisher-Smith, a snow storm triggers a memory from long ago.
John Fisher-Smith is a writer living in Ashland.
3/7/2007
Listen

The Journey Out of Intergenerational Poverty
If you come from a poor family, you’re more likely to drop out of high school, which means your job prospects are fewer, which means fewer living options. These are the effects of "intergenerational poverty." So how do people break out of this cycle? Miriam Widman profiles a woman who's looking at poverty in her rear view mirror with the help of a college program.
3/6/2007
Listen

Living Among the Big Cats
A Northern California woman who saved her husband from a cougar was honored at the state capitol this week. ... Meanwhile, Commentator Michael Moss, a Jacksonville dairy farmer, worries a plan in Oregon could actually raise the likelihood of mountain lion attacks.
3/6/2007
Listen

Celtic Music on California's North Coast
The popularity of Celtic music in America is evident not just in the number of people listening to it, but in the number of people playing it. One of Northern California’s accomplished Celtic groups is Good Company, based in Arcata. The group of four plays this Saturday in Fortuna. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talked with Sam McNeill, who plays violin, cittern, accordion, and does lead vocal, among other things.
3/6/2007
Listen

Loss of Timber Payments Threatens Schools
School boards in rural Northern California meet this week to decide how to cut millions of dollars from their budgets. That could mean a wave of program cuts, teacher layoffs and school closures. Rural schools get much of their funding from national timber receipts, and that money is in danger of drying up. David Gorn of the California Report has more.
3/5/2007
Listen

Travel Group Welcomes the 'Disciples of Tourism'
The people who cheerily greet you at visitor centers around Oregon, it turns out, wield a lot of power in the tourism industry. They can influence where tourists go. And these greeters are gathering this week in Jacksonville for a conference and some sight-seeing. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with Carolyn Hill of the Southern Oregon Visitors Association about how this could benefit the region.
3/5/2007
Listen

Can Seafood be Organic?
Northwest salmon farmers, trout breeders and shellfish growers want to jump into the fast-growing organic category. They're lobbying the government to set standards and begin certifying organic seafood. Oddly enough, some environmental campaigners are trying to deep six this organic expansion. Correspondent Tom Banse has more.
3/5/2007
Listen

Historic Mining Town Turns on Mining
Tourists flock to Jacksonville, Ore., to soak up its Old West ambiance. Now, area residents say that ambiance is being threatened by plans to open a mine on the outskirts of town. But mining is what made Jacksonville wealthy in the first place. Correspondent Chris Lehman reports on the controversy over the Opp Mine.
3/2/2007
Listen

Coastal City Looks to Harness Power of the Pacific
The Oregon coastal town of Reedsport is trying to catch the green energy wave. Literally. An ocean wave energy operation is in the works off the coast of Reedsport. JPR’s Bob Binnewies talks with mayor Keith Tymchuck, a champion of this new technology.
3/2/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
On today’s Nature Notes, Frank dishes out some dieting advice. He suggests avoiding something he calls Weapons of Mass Accumulation.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
3/2/2007
Listen

Oregon Senators Defend County Payments
A subcommittee of the U.S. Senate held a hearing today on the expired county payments program -- the same program that would save Jackson County’s libraries, Josephine County’s sheriff’s department, and Curry County’s financial solvency. Oregon’s senators tried to make a case for the subsidy. JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports on where the conversation went.
3/1/2007
Listen

Bottle Bill Update Takes Shape
Oregon was the first state to pass a bottle bill in 1971, but that bill is now sadly out of date. Three bills have been introduced in the Oregon Senate to rectify the situation. Jefferson Public Radio’s Julia Sommer has more.
3/1/2007
Listen

'The Rainmaker' a 'Fitting' Play for Bandon
Tomorrow “The Rainmaker” opens at the Sprague Theater in Bandon. N. Richard Nash’s 1954 stage play has made the rounds -– it's been turned into a Katherine Hepburn movie, a Broadway musical, and even a TV production. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy asked the director of the Bandon production, Mike Dempsey, to describe this play’s enduring storyline.
3/1/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'A Perspective on Electricity' Coogle
Writer Diana Coogle has lived in a house in the Siskiyou Mountains without electricity for more than 30 years. Living half the week in Eugene these days has made her acutely aware of the differences electricity makes.
Diana Coogle's latest book is "An Explosion of Stars."
3/1/2007
Listen

Oregon Lawmakers Take a Pass on Rainy Day Fund
In the first big showdown of the Oregon legislative session this week, state representatives couldn’t agree on a plan to create a rainy day fund. The fund would be a piggy bank to cushion state services in future recessions. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman reports on what happened to the proposal in the House.
2/28/2007
Listen

Black History Series: Martin Luther King Jr.
In honor of Black History Month, the Jefferson Daily has been airing historic African American speeches, hosted by Southern Oregon University journalism professor D.L. Richardson. Our series concludes today with a rarely heard version of Martin Luther King's "We Shall Overcome" speech, and final thoughts from D.L.
2/28/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'When Music Isn't for the Masses'
In today's commentary, Madeleine DeAndreis shares her thoughts on modern religious music, which she wishes was more old-fashioned.
Madeleine DeAndreis is a writer, teacher and church musician living in Siskiyou County.
2/28/2007
Listen

Snowfall Could Make Schools Fall Short of Mandates
Getting rural kids to school is tough when there's a lot of snow on the road. In some parts of Southern Oregon, there have been so many closures, schools run the risk of falling short of state requirements. JPR's Jessica Robinson reports.
2/27/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'A Recipe for a Stronger Oregon'
State funding for Oregon's public universities is getting small and smaller. So, to fill in the gap, these institutions have raised tuition -- to the point that even state schools require a big investment. Students are lobbying lawmakers to reverse the trend. Kelli Horvath, a freshman at SOU, explains why the state should listen.
 
Kelli Horvath is freshman from Durango, Colo. She’s majoring in International Studies at Southern Oregon University.
2/27/2007
Listen

Black History Series: Barack Obama
In honor of Black History Month, the Jefferson Daily is airing historic African American speeches, hosted by Southern Oregon University journalism professor D.L. Richardson. Today, we'll hear Barak Obama's speech at the 2004 Democratic National Convention.
2/27/2007
Listen

Oregon's 5-Cent Bottle Deposit May Get an Update
More than 35 years ago, Oregon became the first state to require a deposit on beer and soda cans. Now, lawmakers are looking at ways to update the so-called Bottle Bill. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
2/23/2007
Listen

Black History Series: Randall Robinson
In honor of Black History Month, the Jefferson Daily is airing historic African American speeches, hosted by Southern Oregon University journalism professor D.L. Richardson. Today’s speaker is Randall Robinson.  In a speech from 2002, Robinson examines the origins of the gap between whites and blacks in America.
2/23/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank studies a common local weather phenomenon -- air inversions.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
2/23/2007
Listen

Snow Storm Slams the Region
Winter weather has returned for a dramatic second act. Snow dropped on the region last night and today, causing school closures, structural damage and mass power outages. JPR's Jessica Robinson has more.
2/22/2007
Listen

Mount Shasta Woman Shares Everest Feat
Laurie Bagley belongs to a very exclusive club. Few women have successfully made it to the summit of the world's highest peak, Mount Everest. But Bagley has. And she's using the experience to motivate other people to set their sights high. JPR's Valerie Ing-Miller interviews Bagley about her climb.
2/22/2007
Listen

Black History Series: Julian Bond
In honor of Black History Month, the Jefferson Daily is airing historic African American speeches, hosted by Southern Oregon University journalism professor D.L. Richardson. In 1954, the Supreme Court ruled that segregation is unconstitutional in the landmark case Brown v. Board of Education. Bond revisits the case in a 2004 speech called “The Broken Promise of Brown.”
2/22/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Iraq War Flags' by Diana Coogle
Diana Coogle is attending the University of Oregon to earn her PhD. She recently biked to campus to discovered the grounds transformed.
Diana Coogle's latest book is "An Explosion of Stars."
2/22/2007
Listen

Pro Cyclists Tour the Golden State
California resident Levi Leipheimer finished second in today’s stage of the Amgen Tour of California, narrowly losing to German cyclist Jens Voigt. Leipheimer now leads the overall classification by just three seconds. As JPR’s Eric Teel reports, the Tour of California is bringing world-class cycling to the Golden State.
2/21/2007
Listen

Black History Series: Louis Farrakhan
In honor of Black History Month, the Jefferson Daily is airing historic African American speeches, hosted by Southern Oregon University journalism professor D.L. Richardson. Today, we’ll hear a 1984 speech by the controversial civil rights figure Louis Farrakhan.
2/21/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Moon Promenade' by Paula Bandy
NASA recently announced it’s planning another trip to the moon. In today’s commentary, Paula Bandy considers the magnetic effect of this celestial body, even for those planted firmly on earth.
Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
2/21/2007
Listen

Black History Series: Johnetta Cole
In honor of Black History Month, the Jefferson Daily is airing historic African American speeches, hosted by Southern Oregon University journalism professor D.L. Richardson. Today, we hear former Spelman College president Johnetta Cole giving an address in 1994. She speaks about gender equality, as well as racial equality.
2/20/2007
Listen

Story of Theater During Wartime Comes to Camelot
The new production at Camelot Theatre in Talent, Ore., is a story of backstage life during World War II. In “The Dresser,” by Ronald Harwood, bombs and sirens go off in the background as a deteriorating actor prepares to go on as King Lear, with the support of his loyal personal assistant. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy has this preview ...
2/20/2007
Listen

Early California Primary Could Cost Candidates
California has long been a cash cow for presidential campaigns. But if the state moves its primary up to February, presdiential hopefuls will have to do more than just fundraise in the Golden State ... they'll have to raise votes too. And as John Myers of the California Report explains, it's an expensive state to run in.
2/19/2007
Listen

Black History Series: Barbara Jordan
In honor of Black History Month, the Jefferson Daily is airing historic African American speeches, hosted by Southern Oregon University journalism professor D.L. Richardson. Today, we’ll hear a speech Barbara Jordan gave during the Nixon impeachment hearings. Jordan tells the House Judiciary Committee she cannot be an idle spectator to, as she describes it, "the destruction of the Constitution."
2/19/2007
Listen

Ringing in the Year of the Pig
The transition from Western to Eastern instruments has been an educational one for a group of local musicians –- even necessitating a visit to YouTube. They gave themselves a crash-course in traditional Chinese instruments in honor of the Chinese New Year. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with the musicians about the instruments, and hears how the practicing is coming along for this weekend's performance.
2/16/2007
Listen

Black History Speeches: Shirley Chisholm
In honor of Black History Month, the Jefferson Daily is airing historic African American speeches, hosted by Southern Oregon University journalism professor D.L. Richardson. In 1968, Shirley Chisholm became the first African American woman elected to Congress. Today, we hear Chisholm give her 1974 address “The Black Woman in Contemporary America.”
2/16/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Today on Nature Notes, Dr. Frank Lang explains how you too can keep tabs on how climate change is impacting your surroundings.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
2/16/2007
Listen

Kids Out Sick Could Impact School Funding
A contagious virus going around in Shasta County is keeping hundreds of students home sick. It's not too serious -- most kids are better in a few days. But administrators say the dramatic drop in attendance over the last few weeks could end up reducing state funding. JPR's Jessica Robinson reports.
2/15/2007
Listen

North State Symphony in the Mood for Love
This weekend, the North State Symphony will present a program of music dedicated to love and passion. Conductor Kyle Pickett sat down with JPR’s Valerie Ing-Miller to talk about the line-up of Saturday’s Valentine-themed concert in Redding. It’s appropriately titled “All Consuming Passion.”
2/15/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Dinner with Eileen' by Diana Coogle
When Diana Coogle was recently in Bend to give a lecture on food, she was treated to dinner by a true critic of fine dining.
Diana Coogle's latest book is "An Explosion of Stars."
2/15/2007
Listen

Black History Series: Martin Luther King Jr.
In honor of Black History Month, the Jefferson Daily is airing historic African American speeches, hosted by Southern Oregon University journalism professor D.L. Richardson. Today, we’ll hear part two of Martin Luther King's “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” speech, delivered in Memphis, Tenn., in 1968. King was assassinated the day after he gave the speech.
2/15/2007
Listen

Finding Love in the Rural Dating Scene
It's hard enough to be single looking for love. But it gets tougher when you live 150 miles from your date. In honor of Valentine's Day, we're asking this question: How do you find love in the sticks? Chana Joffe-Walt looked into it.
2/14/2007
Listen

Black History Series: Martin Luther King Jr.
In honor of Black History Month, the Jefferson Daily is airing historic African American speeches, hosted by Southern Oregon University journalism professor D.L. Richardson. Today, we’ll hear part one of Martin Luther King Jr. delivering his “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” speech in 1968.
2/14/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Awakened by the Muse' by Fisher-Smith
John Fisher-Smith is currently trying to write a memoir. In today’s commentary, he takes a break from the process to describe the difficult task of teasing out the important moments of his life.
John Fisher-Smith is a writer living in Ashland.
2/14/2007
Listen

Storm Brewing Over Role of State Climatologist
There’s a controversy in Oregon over who gets to be called State Climatologist. Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski wants Oregon State University to take that title away from one of its employees. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman explains.
2/13/2007
Listen

Black History Series: Benjamin Hooks
In honor of Black History Month, the Jefferson Daily is airing historic African American speeches, hosted by Southern Oregon University journalism professor D.L. Richardson. Today we’ll hear Benjamin Hooks speak in 1978 about the need to keep up Martin Luther King’s fight for democracy.
2/13/2007
Listen

Author Explores the Business Behind the Bouquet
Most flowers given at Valentine's Day are the product of a $40 billion a year industry and years of human "refinements." Eureka, Calif., author Amy Stewart traversed the world of cut flowers for her new book "Flower Confidential" (Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill). JPR's Jessica Robinson interviews Stewart about what she discovered.
2/12/2007
Listen

Black History Series: John Hope Franklin
In honor of Black History Month, the Jefferson Daily is airing historic African American speeches, hosted by Southern Oregon University journalism professor D.L. Richardson. Today, we’ll hear a 1969 speech by John Hope Franklin, known as the Father of African American History.
2/12/2007
Listen

I-5 Truckers Go Green
Commercial 18-wheelers get mileage that would make an SUV blush. One environmentalist stopped complaining about big rigs and decided to do something. She's selling anti-pollution devices at an Oregon truck stop. But are truckers jumping at the chance to go green? Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
2/9/2007
Listen

Black History Series: Stokely Carmichael
In honor of Black History Month, the Jefferson Daily is airing historic African American speeches, hosted by Southern Oregon University journalism professor D.L. Richardson. Today, we’ll hear Stokely Carmichael, who embraced “Black Power,” a controversial phrase even within the civil rights movement. In this 1966 speech, Carmichael addresses civil rights legislation -- and who he thinks it's really for.
2/9/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Today on Nature Notes, Frank looks closer at those frequent uninvited guests: box elder bugs.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
2/9/2007
Listen

PacifiCorp Agrees to Fish Ladders for Klamath Dams
PacifiCorp today said it's prepared to install expensive fish ladders on its aging Klamath River dams. The announcement lowers the chances that the four dams near the Oregon-California border will be torn down. Correspondent Tom Banse has more.
2/8/2007
Listen

News Channel Becomes the News
This week, a standoff in Medford forced a local TV station to turn the cameras on themselves. JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports on what happens when the people who cover the news become part of the story.
2/8/2007
Listen

Black History Series: Mary McLeod Bethune
In honor of Black History Month, the Jefferson Daily is airing historic African American speeches, hosted by Southern Oregon University journalism professor D.L. Richardson. Today, we’ll hear Mary McLeod Bethune, giving her 1939 speech called “What Does American Democracy Mean to Me."
2/8/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'String Quartet' by Diana Coogle
Diana Coogle goes to see a world renowned string quartet perform, but finds the most inspiring part is what she sees in the audience.
Diana Coogle's latest book is "An Explosion of Stars."
2/8/2007
Listen

Black History Series: Thurgood Marshall
In honor of Black History Month, the Jefferson Daily is airing historic African American speeches, hosted by Southern Oregon University journalism professor D.L. Richardson. Today, we’ll hear Thurgood Marshall speak before the U.S. Supreme Court as an attorney, almost 10 years before Marhsall was appointed to the bench.
2/7/2007
Listen

Barnstormers Does 'Enchanted April' for the Stage
Romantic comedies seem to spring up like chocolate roses around this time of year. At the Barnstormer’s Theater in Grants Pass, they’re doing a different kind of romantic comedy – -in this case, about friendships between women. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talked with director and cast of "Enchanted April."
2/7/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Bend Overs' by Madeleine DeAndreis
In today's commentary, Madeleine DeAndreis describes the sort of spiritual experience that happens in middle age.
Madeleine DeAndreis is a writer and teacher living in Siskiyou County.
2/7/2007
Listen

Oregon Bank Hold-Ups Go ... Up
There was an increase in the number of bank robberies in Oregon last year. That's right, bank robberies. But modern-day incidents aren’t much like the hold-ups we typically associate with the Old West. JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports on the newly released FBI data.
2/6/2007
Listen

Black History Series: Dick Gregory
In honor of Black History Month, the Jefferson Daily is airing historic African American speeches, hosted by Southern Oregon University journalism professor D.L. Richardson. Today, we’ll hear Dick Gregory, who used to humor to pave the way for civil rights.
2/6/2007
Listen

Black History Series: Fannie Lou Hamer
In honor of Black History Month, the Jefferson Daily is airing historic African American speeches, hosted by Southern Oregon University journalism professor D.L. Richardson. Today we hear Fannie Lou Hamer speaking at the Democratic National Convention in 1964 about being beaten for trying to register to vote.
2/5/2007
Listen

County Workers Union: 'It's not D-Day yet'
The expiration of a federal subsidy threatens to take a big chunk out of county budgets in the region. But one group lobbying Congress to renew the program says it's too early to panic. As JPR's Jessica Robinson reports, a union that represents government workers worries counties are laying off people prematurely.
2/2/2007
Listen

Black History Series: Marcus Garvey
In honor of Black History Month, the Jefferson Daily is airing historic African American speeches, hosted by Southern Oregon University journalism professor D.L. Richardson. Today, we’ll hear Marcus Garvey speak about the Negro Improvement Association in 1921.
2/2/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank prepares for a trip to Patagonia -- the site of many a voyage by naturalists.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
2/2/2007
Listen

Klamath Falls Residents Protest Land Sale
A group of citizens in Klamath Falls is objecting to the sale of a piece of public land near a popular nature trail. They say the land, which includes native cultural sites, was originally intended for preservation. The city says it needs money to pay for local parks. JPR's Jessica Robinson has more.
2/1/2007
Listen

Federal Forest Contractors to Face Scrutiny
When you think of migrant seasonal workers, you might think of orchards or farms. But thousands of workers in Oregon labor in federal forests. Some have spoken out about mistreatment by government contractors. Correspondent Chris Lehman attended a forum in Eugene where federal officials outlined plans to end forest worker abuse.
2/1/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Lord's Prayer' by Diana Coogle
Diana Coogle was driving to Lincoln City, Ore., on the day of the big snowstorm in January. She says difficult road conditions caused unforeseen reactions.
Diana Coogle's latest book is "An Explosion of Stars."
2/1/2007
Listen

Black History Series: Booker T. Washington
In honor of Black History Month, the Jefferson Daily is airing historic African American speeches, hosted by Southern Oregon University journalism professor D.L. Richardson. Today, we’ll hear Booker T. Washington’s 1895 “Atlanta Compromise” speech. It’s the only known recording of Washington’s voice.
2/1/2007
Listen

Attendants Help Mentally Ill Live Independently
For people with severe mental illness, a task that’s simple on one day can be overwhelming the next, like doing laundry, refilling a prescription, or vacuuming. So once or twice a week, Personal Care Attendants visit more than 600 Oregonians living with mental illness. Ann Dornfeld has this look at the innovative program.
1/31/2007
Listen

OSW's 'On Golden Pond' Fills Big Shoes
The play "On Golden Pond" is now showing at Oregon Stage Works in Ashland and will be at Redding’s Cascade Theatre in March. Many people know the Thayer family through the 1981 film adaptation of “On Golden Pond.” JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talked with the director and lead actors of OSW's production about staging such a beloved story.
1/31/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Full Circle' by Paula Bandy
Paula Bandy finds that opposition to sending more troops to Iraq reaches across party lines in her rural community.
Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
1/31/2007
Listen

Oregon Grads Getting Better Work, Bigger Debt
A study that tracks 2005 graduates of Oregon's public universities finds most are employed -- within their degree field, no less -- but they're also paying off larger loans. As JPR's Jessica Robinson reports, the study suggests debt is hitting first generation college students the hardest.
1/30/2007
Listen

Timber Cuts Run Deep
Timber counties across the northwest are making huge budget cuts. That’s because Congress failed to renew a program that subsidizes counties that have large amounts of federally owned forest land. In Jackson County, the budget crunch will mean the closure of the entire library system. Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
1/30/2007
Listen

Co-op Advocates Push Quality of Food, Community
A group of Rogue Valley residents is trying to turn a historic Medford building into a food cooperative. And it’s not just about the food. JPR’s Bob Binnewies talks with one of the organizers about the benefits to the community and local farms.
1/30/2007
Listen

Group Wants Greater Review of Nestle Plant Impact
The organization California Trout is demanding further investigation into the impact of a water bottling plant in McCloud, Calif. Nestle wants to build a plant at the old mill site that would draw about 521-million gallons of water a year. JPR's Jessica Robinson interviews Curtis Knight of California Trout.
1/29/2007
Listen

Lassen County Offers Top-Notch Gunsmithing Program
If you want to want to learn how to build a gun, go to Susanville, Calif. Hundreds of students head to the northeast corner of the state to go to Lassen Community College’s gunsmithing program. Scott Shafer of the California Report visited the junior college and has this story.
1/29/2007
Listen

Timber Counties Begin Cutting Workers
Following the end of federal payments to timber counties, local officials are starting to make some deep cuts in services. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with Nikki Whitty, a commissioner in Coos County, where the layoffs have begun.
1/26/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank describes the cold-seeking Grylloblatta ... and how it got that name.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
1/26/2007
Listen

Oregon Puts Up Surplus on Worldwide Marketplace
A real-life gavel hasn't dropped on a government auction in Oregon since 2000. The state now sells surplus and confiscated items entirely online, through the popular auction site eBay. Officials say it's doubled the return from auctions -- and gives state agencies a little extra cash to work with. JPR's Jessica Robinson reports.
1/25/2007
Listen

Gay and Lesbian Community Honors Local Efforts
The annual Lambda Awards recognize people in the Rogue Valley whose efforts have helped the gay and lesbian community. The 11th annual Lambda Awards are Friday evening. Jessica talks with two of the organizers, Leslie Stone and Michael Erceg, about changes in attitude toward sexual orientation in the region.
1/25/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Cold on the Mountain' by Diana Coogle
The cold weather is especially noticeable for Diana Coogle. In today’s commentary, she describes living in a house without electricity at this time of year.
Diana Coogle's latest book is "An Explosion of Stars."
1/25/2007
Listen

Wyden, Smith Urge Renewal of County Payments
Oregon’s U.S. senators introduced legislation yesterday that would reauthorize the county payments program for seven years. JPR’s Jessica Robinson has more.
1/24/2007
Listen

Bill Would Make English Oregon's Official Language
Rep. Donna Nelson, R-McMinnville, has introduced a bill in the Oregon House that would make English the official language of Oregon. Twenty-eight states with large immigrant populations have passed similar legislation -- most recently, Arizona. Jefferson Public Radio’s Julia Sommer has more.
1/24/2007
Listen

Happy Birthday, Dear Burns ...
Most people don’t know it, but they sing a Robert Burns poem every year, right after the champagne pops. Burns wrote "Auld Lang Syne." This weekend, a group of local musicians will celebrate other, lesser known works by the 18th Century Scottish poet in honor of his birthday. JPR’s Bob Davy has this story ...
1/24/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Backward Glance' by John Fisher-Smith
John Fisher-Smith recently had a long phone conversation with one of this sons. It reminded John of the importance of appreciating where you came from.
John Fisher-Smith is a writer living in Ashland.
1/24/2007
Listen

NW Families Pledge to Buy Nothing New in '07
Remember that annual protest against consumer excess called Buy Nothing Day? Well, some Northwest families are taking it to the next level. They've pledged to buy no new stuff for all of 2007. Correspondent Tom Banse checked in with these shopping celibates to see how it's going. 
1/23/2007
Listen

Preserving Digital Art
How do you preserve art with no physical form? What happens a few years down the line when continuous upgrades and a couple next big things have made the CD or DVD you put your work on obsolete? Dan Drayer of the California Report went looking for answers in San Francisco.
1/23/2007
Listen

Abortion Rights Groups Say Pro-Choice is in Power
Oregon and California received high marks for abortion rights in a report by NARAL Pro-Choice. As JPR's Jessica Robinson reports, advocates intend to extend those rights further now that Democrats are in power.
1/22/2007
Listen

Measure 37 to Face Legislative Scrutiny
Oregon voters approved Measure 37 more than two years ago. Now, lawmakers are looking at whether the controversial land-use law is having its intended effect. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
1/22/2007
Listen

California Demands Cleaner Burning Gas
This week, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger set a goal for California. By the year 2020, all passenger vehicle fuels will have at least 10 percent less carbon content. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with one of the people who will help design the regulation: Dan Sperling, director of the Institute of Transportation Studies at UC Davis.
1/19/2007
Listen

California to Consider Spanking Ban
California parents who spank a young child could be disciplined by the state, under a proposed bill. The legislation would make it a misdemeanor to strike children three years of age or younger. Reporting by Jenny O'Mara and Marianne Russ.
1/19/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank describes the crucial ecological role played by the ubiquitous robin.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
1/19/2007
Listen

Is the Bloom Off the Biodiesel Rose?
This week plans for a much-anticipated biodiesel refinery in the Northwest hit the skids. That’s bad news for a budding industry that seems to offer so much. Correspondent Elizabeth Wynne Johnson has this reality-check on the status biodiesel in the region.
1/18/2007
Listen

Hanford Finds Nuclear Research Remains (Literally)
Workers at the Hanford site in southeastern Washington state have unearthed an unusual remnant of the nuclear age. They dug up a railroad car filled with animal carcasses and manure. Chana Joffe-Walt digs up the story.
1/18/2007
Listen

Fiddle Preservation Society a Lively Bunch
According to the old joke, the only difference between a violin and fiddle is that nobody cares if you spill beer on the fiddle. But these days, even fiddles are respectable. Fiddle music even has its own preservation society. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy has this story on the Old Time Fiddlers Association.
1/18/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Loken Trees' by Diana Coogle
It's hard to see your childhood home replaced with a newer, more modern house. Diana Coogle is mourning the destruction of her former home in Georgia. And it's not just the house itself she'll miss. It's also the trees ...
Diana Coogle's latest book is "An Explosion of Stars."
1/18/2007
Listen

Freshmen Legislators Learn the Ways of the Capitol
No matter how accomplished you are in the private sector, you still have to learn the ins and outs of state government. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman spent some time with some freshmen politicians and has their story.
1/17/2007
Listen

Schools Face Tough Decision in Winter Weather
It's the phrase students long for every time it snows: school is closed. But what goes into the decision to call a snow day? JPR's Jessica Robinson asked Kerm Bennett, a superintendent in Jackson County.
1/17/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'I Am God' by Madeleine DeAndreis
Madeleine DeAndreis has found that, as a mother, she has a heightened sense of when a child is in trouble. In today’s commentary Madeleine explains how this power once paid off on a shopping trip with her son.
Madeleine DeAndreis is writer and teacher living in Siskiyou County.
1/17/2007
Listen

Oregon Reps Make Last-Ditch Attempt for Safety Net
A federal program that makes up for lost timber dollars in rural counties ended last year. Now, the region is facing cuts to schools, roads, county sheriff's offices and other services. In Jackson County, libraries will shut down. JPR's Jessica Robinson asks Oregon Congressman Greg Walden about efforts to re-authorize the safety net.
1/16/2007
Listen

Birdsong Recordist Overcomes Sonic 'Pollution'
Would you believe the common domestic pigeon would be the hardest bird to record in the Northwest? That's what soundman Martyn Stewart discovered as he worked on a new guide to birdsongs of the Pacific Northwest. Correspondent Tom Banse walked through the woods with a man with an enviable job.
1/16/2007
Listen

'That Night' by Lawson Inada
Even today, the details of Thursday, April 4, 1968 stick with many people. It was the day Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated. Oregon poet laureate Lawson Inada reads a poem he wrote shortly after the shooting.
 
Lawson Inada’s books of poetry include “Before the War” and “Legends from Camp.” He edited the anthology “Only What We Could Carry: The Japanese American Internment Experience.”
1/15/2007
Listen

A Tumult of Tumbling Tumbleweeds
While much of the region deals with cold temperatures, snow and ice, people east of the Cascades are facing another problem: tumbleweeds. Strong winds in the Inland Northwest are moving the weeds fast and piling them high. Chana Joffe-Walt asked Noel Harden about it. He's fire chief in Washington's Asotin County.
1/15/2007
Listen

California Media Roundtable
Arnold Schwarzenegger has introduced a new budget, and a new proposal for fixing the health care system. Scott Shafer of the California Report talks with newspaper editors from Redding, Fresno and San Diego to hear what people around the state are saying.
1/15/2007
Listen

Labor Chief Wants 8-Hour Work Day in Oregon
Right now, workers in Oregon get overtime pay when they put in more than 40 hours in a week. The Oregon labor commissioner wants overtime to kick when an employee works more than eight hours in a day. JPR's Jessica Robinson has more.
1/12/2007
Listen

New Mayor of Union Just Old Enough to Vote
Kyle Corbin was sworn into office this week as mayor of Union, Ore. He's 18 years old and won the election as a write-in candidate. Voters hope the fresh young face will end years of political bickering in the northeastern Oregon town. Reporter Chana Joffe-Walt spent inauguration day with Mayor Corbin.
1/12/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank puts this test to supposed Northwesterners: Can you pick a good Dungeness crab?
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
1/12/2007
Listen

Lakeview Job Market to Get Boost from Green Power
A biomass plant is expected to create 85 new jobs next year in Lake County, Ore. As JPR's Jessica Robinson reports, Governor Kulongoski sees the demand for biomass and other forms of green energy as an opportunity for rural Oregon.
1/11/2007
Listen

Hanford's Toxic Plumes Head Toward Columbia
The Hanford Nuclear Reservation in southeast Washington is known as the most polluted place in North America. Underground toxic plumes are heading toward the Columbia River. Some have even reached river's edge. Clean-up is underway, but critics say efforts are woefully inadequate. Today we bring you the second part of a special report on the Northwest's Cold War legacy and its present-day threat to the environment. Correspondent Austin Jenkins recently toured the Hanford site with a scientist who's on the frontlines of Hanford clean-up.
1/11/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Dismantling Loken' by Diana Coogle
When Diana Coogle visited Atlanta over Christmas, she said she wouldn't be revisiting her childhood home, since the house will soon be destroyed. But she did go back, as she describes today ...
Diana Coogle's latest book is "An Explosion of Stars."
1/11/2007
Listen

OSF to See Change in Artistic Leadership
The Oregon Shakespeare Festival's new artistic director Bill Rauch is making plans for the Ashland company that will mean new blood in some top jobs. As JPR's Jessica Robinson reports, that means losing some familiar faces.
1/5/2007
Listen

Disabled Northwest Girl Medically Frozen in Time
Doctors in Seattle have purposely stunted the growth of a disabled Northwest girl. She's effectively frozen in time as a 9-year-old. Word of the treatment has unleashed a torrent of reaction around the world. Correspondent Tom Banse reports. 
1/5/2007
Listen

Outdoorswomen Step into Traditional Male Pastime
Fewer hunting licenses are being issued across the U.S. And that means fewer license fees supporting wildlife agencies. The state of Oregon is trying to attract a new group of recreators with a program called Becoming an Outdoors Woman. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with coordinator Nancy Smogor.
1/5/2007
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
What would we cope in winter without modern amenities? Frank reveals how animals make it through the cold months.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
1/5/2007
Listen

New Congress Last Chance for Library Funding
Congress convened today in Washington. Back in Jackson County, Oregon, the new session is seen as the last chance for county libraries. Local politicians and library supporters are hoping federal lawmakers will reinstate a program that helps keep the library system running. JPR's Jessica Robinson reports.
Julia Sommer contributed to this story.
1/4/2007
Listen

Giving Help to the Little Guy
In a dispute with a government agency, a corporation or a business owner, it's easy to feel like you don't have much recourse. Help Now! Advocacy Center in Medford helps the little guy negotiate with the big guy. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with founder Larry Kahn about finding solutions to consumer problems.
1/4/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Campus' by Diana Coogle
Next week, Diana Coogle goes back to the University of Oregon for her second term in graduate school. She's looking forward to returning to class, as well as the campus itself.
Diana Coogle's latest book is "An Explosion of Stars."
1/4/2007
Listen

Students Represent Growing Number of Homeless
They go to school, play games at recess and take spelling tests just like other kids. But for homeless students, in some ways the hard part starts when they leave school. Reporter Miriam Widman profiles one Northwest student who’s been in and out of housing.
1/3/2007
Listen

Giving Children a Voice in the Legal System
In cases of child abuse or neglect, the person who represents the child in court is often a volunteer from the community. They’re known as a Court Appointed Special Advocate, or CASA for short. JPR's Bob Binnewies speaks with Jennifer Mylenek, executive director of the Jackson County CASA.
1/3/2007
Listen

Commentary: 'Lost Identity' by John Fisher-Smith
In the depths of winter, John Fisher-Smith traces the line between dreams and reality.
John Fisher-Smith is a writer living in Ashland.
1/3/2007
Listen

Keeping Your Resolve
It often happens that breaking your resolution is as much a part of the tradition as setting one. JPR's Jessica Robinson gets some tips from a professional life-improver, life coach Elizabeth Austin of Ashland, on the painful process of change.
1/2/2007
Listen

Lawmaker Sets His Legislative Resolution
State lawmakers are setting their own resolutions for widespread change at this time of year. In California, the author of the state's landmark Mental Health Services Act has been out of the state legislature for two years now. But Darrell Steinberg is back this year with a plan to help children. Ellen Ciurczak profiles the senator.
1/2/2007
Listen

New Year's Day Flood: A Decade Later
Today marks the 10th anniversary of the New Year's Day flood that blocked traffic on I-5 for days and closed down Ashland for weeks. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with Lucy Edwards of the Community Emergency Response Team about the '97 flood and CERT's work to improve relief efforts if -- or perhaps when -- another flood hits.
1/1/2007
Listen

'Pop' Goes the New Year
It's being chilled for the big night, but how do you open champagne without maiming someone with the cork? JPR's Jessica Robinson gets a lesson from Ashland wine writer and merchant Lorn Razzano.
12/29/2006
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Recent news events inspire this Nature Note on hypothermia.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
12/29/2006
Listen

Anti-Cruelty Measure Frees Up Ashland Dogs
The Ashland City Council will consider an ordinance next week that could require some pet owners to change how they keep their dog -- including how long they tie up their pet and the size of the enclosure it's kept in. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with Barbara E. Rosen, the driving force behind the proposed animal rights law.
12/28/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Poetry of the Night' by Diana Coogle
When Diana Coogle had dinner with her son and his wife, father, and stepmother recently, they talked about putting an electrical system in her house ... a step in progress she isn't entirely sure she wants to make.
Diana Coogle's latest book is "An Explosion of Stars."
12/28/2006
Listen

Recognizing Life in Death
When a woman has a stillbirth, the loss can feel just as hard as losing a living child. But these mothers-to-be often feel like their babies aren't recognized. Now moms have gotten together to fight for birth certificates for their stillborn babies. Chana Joffe-Walt has the story of one woman fighting for acknowledgement of life and loss.
12/27/2006
Listen

Reverse Migration Takes Greek Family Home
An interesting twist in America's ongoing debate over immigration is the phenomenon of "turn-around migration." We've heard about Irish heading home. Greece is experiencing it too. Correspondent Tom Banse introduces us to a Greek family who flourished in Seattle for nearly 30 years, then returned to their homeland.
12/27/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Shut Up and Eat It' by DeAndreis
Food is a central part of many events during the holiday season. In today's commentary, Madeleine DeAndreis ponders the mystery surrounding what kids will or won't eat.
Madeleine DeAndreis is a writer and teacher living in Siskiyou County.
12/27/2006
Listen

Vancouver Tries To Avoid Mistakes of Past Olympics
Vancouver, Canada is getting lots of advice as our northern neighbor prepares to host the 2010 Winter Olympics. The Italians have come by, hosts of the last Winter Games. Athens and Salt Lake City have also offered lessons learned. Correspondent Tom Banse went continent hopping to see Olympian feats and foul-ups.
12/26/2006
Listen

No Princely Nutcrackers for this Aficionado
The character in the ballet may be the most famous nutcracker, but it takes a more efficient one if you really crack a nut. One Northern California man has a whole collection of these nutty gizmos. He demonstated a few for reporter Elaine Corn.
12/26/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'The Cabin' by Judie Bunch
This is the time of year for reconnecting with old friends, as well as remembering the friendships that have been lost over time. Today, Judie Bunch recalls some acquaintances from long ago, but not forgotten.
Judie Bunch is a writer living in Talent, Ore.
12/26/2006
Listen

Once Upon a Christmas ...
On a special holiday edition of the Jefferson Daily, Jessica Robinson presents a collection of stories from JPR listeners and staff members. Some are poignant, others funny. All are stories of the magically unexpected that could only happen at this time of year.
 
Stories on the show:
 
- Two city mice head to the country –- way, out in the country -- to Yosemite National Park for Christmas. Told by Allyn Stone of Ashland.
 
- A family just can’t get into the holiday spirit, until a famous character from fiction saves them. Written by Jennie Englund of Ashland.
 
- A little girl, even though all her friends and all the adults think they know better, isn’t about to be convinced that there’s no Santa, nor that candy canes don’t sprout from the ground. Told by Valerie Ing-Miller of Redding.
 
- You may think there’s a pretty standard way of getting and decorating a Christmas tree, but in our final story, a father and daughter explain the detailed ritual of how it’s done in their family. Told by Scott and Amelia Clay of Jacksonville, Ore.
12/25/2006
Listen

Santa: Behind the Beard
It's not often you get an inside look into the world of a mall Santa. Most stay in character and don't give interviews. But a former Santa is now talking about his time on the job. Ellen Ciurczak reports.
12/22/2006
Listen

Tomáseen Foley Creates a Regional Tradition
Some families see "The Nutcracker." Others go to a choral concert during the holiday season. In Northern California and Southern Oregon, many families visit a remote farming parish in the West of Ireland. JPR's Bob Davy talks with Tomáseen Foley about the Irish storytelling and traditions he presents here every holiday season in "A Celtic Christmas."
12/22/2006
Listen

Gift Wrap 101
If your wrapping efforts usually turn out looking more appropriate for fresh fish than for a carefully chosen present, we have some tips for you. Correspondent Elizabeth Wynne Johnson talked with gift-wrap guru Kate Vaughan of the Sweetpea home and gift shop in Coeur d’Alene ...
12/22/2006
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank discusses the oft mysterious and sometime holiday dish -- eels.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
12/22/2006
Listen

Local Efforts Help Fill Food Pantry's Bare Shelves
The commodity shipments to food banks from the federal government have been slowly declining. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with Vicki Penny of ACCESS, Inc., one of Jackson County's key charities, about stocking pantry shelves this season despite the loss.
12/21/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Christmas Lights' by Diana Coogle
Today is the winter solstice, a good time, says Diana Coogle, for turning on the Christmas lights.
Diana Coogle's latest book is "An Explosion of Stars."
12/21/2006
Listen

Pawn for the Holidays
Malls and big-box stores aren’t the only places that see a bump in business around the holidays. It's high season for pawnshops, too. A quick-cash solution for some, a bargain-hunter’s paradise for others: at a pawnshop, Christmas commerce comes full circle. Correspondent Elizabeth Wynne Johnson reports.
12/21/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Santa Carousel' by Paula Bandy
Paula Bandy recently took in a bit of Americana in the Klamath Basin. It turned out to be an unusual experience -- and not because of the giant boot, the cowboy Santa, or the trick horse.
Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
12/20/2006
Listen

Jackson County to Close the Book on Libraries
The federal program that helps fill the budgets of timber counties wasn't renewed by Congress this fall. JPR's Bob Binnewies talks with Jackson County Commissioner Dave Gilmour about the financial shortfall that will likely force the county libraries to close, and what options exit for salvaging any part of the lending system.
12/20/2006
Listen

New Technology Brings Santa to Hospital by Remote
Children in a Sacramento hospital got a high-tech visit from Santa yesterday. Cisco Systems lent its teleconferencing equipment to the effort. The hospital was one of only five in the world with new technology that allows Christmas visits by remote. Ellen Ciurczak reports.
12/19/2006
Listen

Scrooge Gets 21st Century Makeover
A new musical version of "A Christmas Carol" by local playwrights Markita and Kirby Shaw explores the past that led Ebenezer Scrooge into miserdom. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy has this story on "Scroogical."
12/19/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Death on My Mind' by Will Brophy
Aside from the usual holiday festivities, winter also signals the end of a yearly cycle -- and the start of a new one. Today, commentator and former science teacher Will Brophy offers this perspective ...
Will Brophy is a retired biology and botany professor who splits his time between Santa Cruz and Shingletown, Calif.
12/19/2006
Listen

Mt. Shasta's Gentle Thunder Nominated for Grammy
When the celebrity Grammy presenters announce “And the winner is ...” in the new age category, the name that follows could be Gentle Thunder. JPR's Bob Binnewies talks with the Mount Shasta musician about her Grammy nominated album and the influence of her Cree heritage.
12/18/2006
Listen

Counties say Land Sale Will Save Schools, Services
We examine a plan to rescue timber-dependent counties from financial crisis. It involves 2.4 million acres in public land in Oregon. Half the acreage would be set aside for species habitat and the other half would be sold for timber production. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with Douglas County Commissioner Doug Robertson, one of the architects of the proposal.
 
To read the official proposal click here.
12/15/2006
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
The stopper in your wine bottle -- mineral or vegetable? Dr. Frank Lang extols the virtues of sticking with a natural cork.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
12/15/2006
Listen

Separated by a Common Language
These days, most Native Americans grow up speaking English. So you might not think language would be a barrier for native students. But many Indian kids speak a dialect that’s rooted in native language. That affects how students learn in the classroom and how well they perform on standardized tests.  Correspondent Elizabeth Wynne Johnson introduces us to the dialect known as "Red English."
12/14/2006
Listen

Mount Ashland Opens Friday
Even at 7,000 feet, there's no guarantee of a decent snow pack. Every year, Mount Ashland ski area officials keep their fingers crossed, and this year the skies delivered. The ski area opens tomorrow. JPR's Jessica Robinson has the story.
12/14/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Red Hat Society' by Diana Coogle
The Internet has made the world smaller, but Diana Coogle argues, in doing so, it can also cheat us of personal expression.
Diana Coogle's latest book is "An Explosion of Stars."
12/14/2006
Listen

Christmas Tree Growers Look South
More Christmas trees are grown in Oregon than in any other state. Nearly half of them are sent to California. An increasing number are being sent even farther south: to Mexico. Correspondent Chris Lehman has more.
12/13/2006
Listen

No Store-Bought Christmas Tree for These Families
Some people still like a little forest with their tree. A federal program during the holidays allows families to get their Christmas tree from public forest land. These “wild” trees may not have the perfection of a farm-grown or artificial tree, but as JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports, many people are willing to give up perfection for a little tradition.
12/13/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Spending Time' by John Fisher-Smith
In today's commentary, John Fisher-Smith considers different ways of spending one's "golden years."
John Fisher-Smith is a writer living in Ashland.
12/13/2006
Listen

Waves Grow, Erosion Cuts Deeper on Coast
A new study on the Northwest coast says the storms that hit every winter have become more intense in recent years. And they may be taking some of the coastline with them. JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports.
12/12/2006
Listen

Saving the Sierra: Part Three
For more than 100 years, cattle ranchers have used publicly owned land as low-cost summer pasture for their herds. But they’re coming under pressure to stop. Today, we bring you the final story in a series by the California Report on preserving the rural Sierra Nevada. Producer Catherine Stifter looks at an experiment to resolve the impasse over one of the West's most contentious issues: grazing on public lands.
12/12/2006
Listen

Choosing Small Town Life Over a Big City Paycheck
Local entrepreneur Jorge Yant emigrated from Mexico as a teen, quickly picked up both English and the language of computers, and now runs the Ashland-based software firm Plexis Healthcare Systems. JPR's Bob Binnewies talks with Yant about leaving the Bay Area for a small town in rural Southern Oregon.
12/11/2006
Listen

The Art of Pińata-Making
In California, one craftsman goes beyond the familiar mass-produced pińata figures. He treats pińata-making as an art, and can make just about any figure you choose. Kathryn Baron of the California Report sends this postcard from San Francisco.
12/11/2006
Listen

NW Cities Receive Dishonor in 'Worst Places' Book
Just in time for the holidays comes a lump of coal for some Northwest chambers of commerce. Four Northwest cities get dissed in a new book purporting to list "The Absolutely Worst Places to Live in America." Correspondent Tom Banse sampled the colorful insults.
12/8/2006
Listen

California Honors its Greats
The first 13 members of California’s new Hall of Fame were inducted at the California Museum in Sacramento this week. Marianne Russ visited the exhibit.
12/8/2006
Listen

Cinderella Gets a 'Panto' Style Makeover
It's Cinderella, but with cross-dressing and jokes on the Rogue Valley. "Cindy Rella" at the Oregon Cabaret Theatre is the children's classic in British "panto" style. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy gets a behind the scenes look at the outrageous holiday show.
12/8/2006
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Charles Darwin's writings may be controversial, but a recent reading reminds Dr. Frank Lang that they were also some of the most entertaining scientific narratives.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
12/8/2006
Listen

First-Ever Unionized Foster Parents Set to Lobby
Last spring, foster parents in Washington state became the first in the nation to unionize. At the time, they said the state's foster system -– like those in many other states -- was in crisis. Now these volunteer parents are preparing for their first legislative session as union members. Austin Jenkins profiles one family at the forefront of the movement.
12/7/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Foolish Money' by Diana Coogle
Diana Coogle is dealing with the recent loss of her mother. But as Diana explains today, she is able to remember her mother through something she gave Diana: a tradition.
Diana Coogle's latest book is "An Explosion of Stars."
12/7/2006
Listen

State Exhibits Sights and Sounds of Wartime Oregon
Today, for the 65th anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the Oregon Archives Division launched an online exhibit that depicts life in Oregon during World War II. The site is called "Life on the Homefront: Oregon Responds to World War II." JPR's Jessica Robinson takes an audio tour through the exhibit.
12/7/2006
Listen

The Kim Family's Journey
The conclusion to the search for the Kim family ended tragically today when rescue crews found the body of James Kim in a remote mountain area of Southern Oregon. His body was about a mile from where his family became stranded over the Thanksgiving weekend. JPR’s Jessica Robinson follows the Kims' fateful journey into, and finally out of, the wilderness.
12/6/2006
Listen

Oregon Tortilla Maker Seeks New Markets
Even this far from the border, it’s not hard to find Mexican food. There are Mexican restaurants in nearly every town across the Northwest, which adds up to tens of thousands of tortillas being served each day. Many of those tortillas come from Salem, home to one of the largest tortilla factories in the country. Correspondent Chris Lehman stopped in for a visit.
12/6/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Fake Book' by Madeleine DeAndreis
Madeleine DeAndreis makes it a point to sing this holiday season.
Madeleine DeAndreis is a writer and teacher living in Siskiyou County.
12/6/2006
Listen

Crews Search for Missing Dad in Oregon Wilderness
Rescue teams are following tracks in the snow in Southern Oregon, hoping they will lead to James Kim, who set out on Saturday to get help for his stranded family. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with Jackson County Sheriff Mike Winters about the search and about what other travelers can learn from the Kim Family's ordeal.
12/5/2006
Listen

Court: BLM Logged Illegally in Southern Oregon
A federal court ruled Monday that a local Bureau of Land Management timber sale in old-growth forest was illegal. The court said the agency didn't consider the impacts on salmon and spotted owl habitat that this sale would have in combination with other sales. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with George Sexton of the Klamath Siskiyou Wildlands Center about the on-the-ground outcome of the ruling.
12/5/2006
Listen

Governor Kulongoski Reveals Budget
Ted Kulongoski says Oregon is entering a new era of opportunity. That was the theme the governor played up as he unveiled his new $15 billion budget to reporters Monday. At the top of the list was money for education, health care and state police. Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman reports.
12/5/2006
Listen

5 Years of Elections Strain California Counties
Between the regularly scheduled general elections and the politically induced special elections, Californians have gone to the polls every fall for the last five years. As JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports, that's taken a toll on county budgets.
12/4/2006
Listen

Bond Campaign Took a Cue from Madison Avenue
The backers of California's education bond, Proposition 1D, gave the California Report unprecedented behind-the-scenes access to the operations of the campaign. As John Myers discovered, the bond measure campaigns can trace many of their practices to the commercial advertising lessons of Madison Avenue.
12/4/2006
Listen

NW Athlete Faces Culture Shock in Greece
Every year, dozens of athletes who’ve been passed over by the NBA or NFL travel across the pond to sign with a European team. But even the stadium comes with a fair dose of culture shock. Correspondent Tom Banse profiles a former Oregon State women’s basketball star who's playing pro-ball in Athens.
12/1/2006
Listen

'Tis the Season for Pageantry
Parental bragging rights aren't the only objective of school Christmas pageants. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy interviews a local Waldorf teacher with the Shasta Mountain Learning Center about the educational merits of this holiday tradition.
12/1/2006
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
An encounter with the aromatic evidence of a dog v. skunk scuffle, Frank muses on the skunk's defense system and what to do when you or your dog has been the victim of it.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
12/1/2006
Listen

Staking Hopes on Crabs, Fishers Wrangle for Price
Fresh Dungeness crab from the coast will be hard to come by until crabbers and processors can come to an agreement on price. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with Charleston area crabber Jeff Reeves, who says fishermen are still reeling from the curtailed salmon season and expected crabbing to keep them afloat.
11/29/2006
Listen

Life on the Farm Holds Dangers for Children
When you picture a family farm, you might think of a peaceful, idyllic setting. But a farm these days can be a bustling, high-intensity workplace. That’s an especially dangerous combination when kids are involved. Correspondent Chris Lehman reports on an effort to make farms safer for children.
11/29/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'A Day in the Life' by Paula Bandy
A textbook bad day turns out to be a growing experience for Paula Bandy.
Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
11/29/2006
Listen

Capitol X-Mas Tree Hails From Northwest Woods
The U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree arrived in Washington, D.C. this week. This year, it’s Northwest-grown. Washington State has the honor of providing the Capitol tree. But as Correspondent Austin Jenkins found out, it takes a lot of money, careful planning and even some smoke and mirrors to deliver the nation's tree.
11/28/2006
Listen

'A Modern Woman' Addresses Long-Standing Conflicts
It was supposed to be a Christmas story. But "A Modern Woman" ended up dealing with women's suffrage, family tension, and the struggle between what's right and what's tradition. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with Ashland playwright Ruth Wire and the director/music director of the new production of her play, Bob Miner.
11/28/2006
Listen

Three Weeks Later, Election Nearly Finalized
There's more to counting ballots than a Tuesday night in early November. County officials continue tallying for weeks. And in Oregon, some counties, including Jackson, ran into computer problems that slowed the process. JPR's Jessica Robinson reports on what goes into certifying an election. Then, Ellen Ciurczak looks at California's safeguard against machine error: hand-counting.
11/27/2006
Listen

Saving the Sierra: Part Two
Earning a living in agriculture in the Sierra foothills means finding ways to make profitable connections with the millions of suburban residents living close by. In the second in her three-part series, Catherine Stifter of the California Report hit the highway to meet local boosters of agricultural tourism.
11/27/2006
Listen

3 Million Children, 33 Days
Spryte Loriano has a big wish this holiday season. Over 33 days, the Ashland resident is going to try to raise enough money to feed 3 million hungry children. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with Loriano about her national campaign called Feed 333 and how she's using technology to meet her goals.
11/24/2006

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank, who laments the usual lack of nature-themed postage stamps in the United States, is celebrating a recent release called "Crops of the Americas."
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
11/24/2006
Listen

Nearly Extinct Turkey Breeds Making a Comeback
A lot of chefs are focused this week on how to cook the perfect turkey. For some foodies, the quest goes beyond the recipe book. It involves finding a tastier variety of bird. Some are trying to bring back vanishing breeds called "heritage" turkeys, similar to the concept of "heirloom" tomatoes. Tom Banse reports on a campaign to reacquaint American diners and breeders with the birds.
11/23/2006
Listen

What's Turkey's Favorite Grape?
Wine writer, professor and merchant Lorn Razzano chats with JPR's Jessica Robinson about pairing wine with Thanksgiving dinner, and why it doesn't matter if it's white or red (as long as it doesn't have a particular property of Kool-Aid).
11/22/2006
Listen

Controversial Meth Treatment Comes to Northwest
Imagine if a methamphetamine or cocaine addict could take a cocktail of medicines that would cure those cravings. One company claims it's pioneered this magic elixir. But as Correspondent Austin Jenkins reports, the treatment is controversial.
11/21/2006
Listen

Rhythms of West Africa Resonate in Southern Oregon
In the West African republic of Guinea, the soundtrack of life is played on the drum. There, percussive rhythms highlight the important events of life -- birth, marriage, death -- as well as life's day-to-day activities. On Monday, Nov. 27, this music will be part of a program at Southern Oregon University called “Rituals and Gestures.” JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talks with Ryan Camara, the director of SOU’s West African Drumming Ensemble, and a student of Guinean music.
11/21/2006
Listen

Student Newsmen (And Women) Relaunch Ashland Paper
Ashland's youngest journalists have published the first issue of the Rogue News. JPR's Bob Binnewies talks with Molly McGuire, co-editor of the Ashland High School newspaper.
11/20/2006
Listen

California Cities Say 'No' to Secondhand Smoke
With smoke-free restaurants, buildings, offices and even beaches becoming the norm, home was about the only refuge left for a smoker. But a growing number of California cities are going after the cigarette smoke that drifts from someone's home into a neighbor's yard, or through pipes and cracks in apartment buildings. Sarah Varney of the California Report has more.
11/20/2006
Listen

The West Coast's Tsunami Magnet
Crescent City, Calif., is recovering from a "small" tsunami that caused tens of thousands of dollars in damage to its harbor this week. Geologist Lori Dengler of Humboldt State University explains to JPR's Jessica Robinson why it isn't surprising that an earthquake near Russia would cause a tsunami at this particular port.
11/17/2006
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank goes in search of the amethyst cedar borer, an insect fond of Southern Oregon's Port Orford cedar, and finds an unexpected connection to himself.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
11/17/2006
Listen

Enviro-Groups Say BLM Sale Harms Old-Growth Area
Environmentalists in the Rogue Valley say the local Bureau of Land Management office is reckless with unspoiled old-growth forests, and point to a timber sale today in the so-called "Zane Grey Roadless Area" north of Grants Pass as an example of important forest land the BLM should protect. JPR's Jessica Robinson reports.
11/16/2006
Listen

Whiskeytown Seeks Artist Seeking Inspiration
Whiskeytown National Recreation Area in Northern California is looking for artists willing to come to the park and paint, sculpt, compose or write about their experience. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with artist-in-residence program coordinator Sheila Edridge.
11/16/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Social Adjustments' by Diana Coogle
Moving to a new place, as Diana Coogle is experiencing, can create a shocking dissociation from your own past.
Diana Coogle's latest book is "An Explosion of Stars."
11/16/2006
Listen

Ex-Girlfriend Writes About Pre-Politics Arnold
When the governor's former girlfriend writes a tell-all book, it's a little unusual for the governor to pen the forward. But that's the case with a new book on California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger. Jenny O'Mara interviews author Barbara Outland Baker about "Arnold and Me: In the Shadow of the Austrian Oak."
11/15/2006
Listen

Redding Group Preserves Jazz in North State
Every third Sunday of the month, jazz fans gather in Redding, Calif., for a concert presented by the Rivercity Jazz Society. The group’s mission is to help preserve the traditional style of jazz that came out of New Orleans. This Sunday’s concert is the Boondockers Band. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy talked with Rivercity Jazz Society past-president Steve Fisher, and has this preview.
11/15/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Drive Me Crazy' Madeleine DeAndreis
Madeleine DeAndreis explains why she's not quite ready for her teenage daughter to start driving.
Madeleine DeAndreis is a writer and teacher living in Siskiyou County.
11/15/2006
Listen

Saving the Sierra: Part One
As development races up the Sierra Nevada mountainsides, it threatens not only the landscape and its resources, but also rural residents and their ways of life. In the first of a three-part series from the California Report, producers Jesikah Maria Ross and Catherine Stifter traveled an hour north of Lake Tahoe to learn about local strategies to preserve one of the last, best rural places in the Sierra Nevada.
11/14/2006
Listen

Mt Shasta Writers Group to Launch Cultural Journal
Dr. Jim Brown, with the Writer's Series in Mount Shasta, talks with JPR's Bob Binnewies about the group's mission and about plans to publish a collection of regional writings.
11/14/2006
Listen

County Resolves Ashland Voting Glitch
Jackson County elections officials have finished re-tabulating ballots from an Ashland precinct, following a strange error on election night. Meanwhile, there's another, pen-related election night problem the county is still trying to rectify. JPR's Jessica Robinson reports.
 
11/14/2006
Listen

An Uneasy Peace Between Wolves and Ranchers
Advocates for wolves say they embody a kind of wildness that’s disappearing from the Northwest. Foes say wolves are a symbol of everything that’s wrong with government-led species protection. With recent accounts of wolf sightings in Eastern Oregon, some Oregon ranchers worry the animals are migrating in from Idaho, where wolves were re-introduced a decade ago. Elizabeth Wynne Johnson reports from Idaho on what’s at stake in the wolf issue.
11/13/2006
Listen

Ashland Woman Assists UN Efforts in Nepal
Joyce Stanley of Ashland was recently yanked out of retirement to return to work for the United Nations. JPR's Bob Binnewies interviews Stanely, now back from Nepal, about her history with the UN and her task in the politically uneasy Himalayan country.
11/13/2006
Listen

Glitch Alters Ashland Vote Count
Jackson County elections officials are retrieving and re-tabulating ballots from an Ashland precinct after a glitch on election night seemed to affect the results. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with County Clerk Kathy Beckett.
11/10/2006
Listen

Four Plead Guilty in Eco-Sabotage Case
Four accused eco-saboteurs pleaded guilty this week to conspiracy to commit arson in several incidents around the Northwest. The government calls the arsons "domestic terrorism" which caused $30 million in damage over five years. The defendants said they were ready to take responsibility for their actions. But as Colin Fogarty reports, unanswered questions remain.
11/10/2006
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank slices into that inscrutable holiday dish -- mince meat pie.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
11/10/2006
Listen

Changes in Store for Oregon Legislature
The Oregon legislature will enter its 2007 session with Democrats in control of the House and the Senate. With Ted Kulongoski’s re-election as Governor, it will be the first time in 16 years the Democrats have that much power in Salem. Chris Lehman reports on what this means for the legislative process.
11/9/2006
Listen

'The Weir' Shows at Shasta College
JPR's Valerie Ing-Miller talks with Robert Soffian, director of Shasta College's production of the Irish play "The Weir."
11/9/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Being a Student' by Diana Coogle
Long-time professor Diana Coogle finds herself on the other side of the lectern.
Diana Coogle's latest book is "An Explosion of Stars."
11/9/2006
Listen

Oregonians Say 'No' to Conservative Measures
Unlike in other states, the midterm elections haven't altered Oregon's Congressional delegation, which was already mostly Democratic. But that doesn't mean there aren't other signs the political shift in the state. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with political analyst Bill Lunch of Oregon State University about the key wins and losses.
11/8/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Greenhouse & Nasturtiums' Paula Bandy
Paula Bandy finds a connection between the changing season and the changing winds in her own life.
Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
11/8/2006
Listen

The Life of a Ballot
Oregon's vote by mail system allows voters here to make their decisions at home and then drop their ballot in the mail or leave it at a designated drop-off site. But that means most voters never see the voting process in action. JPR's Jessica Robinson reports from the Jackson County Elections Office on the journey your ballot takes.
11/7/2006
Listen

Artist Chronicles Family Secret as 'Paper People'
The work of Chinese-American artist and California resident Flo Oy Wong is part of a traveling exhibit in Redding called Women Only! In Their Studios. Wong talks with JPR's Valerie Ing-Miller.
11/7/2006
Listen

Income Tax Proposed for Public Safety
One of the challenges for any community is how to adequately fund its cops and courts. One Oregon county wants to try something different. Correspondent Chris Lehman reports from Eugene on a unique tax measure that’s on the Tuesday ballot.
11/6/2006

A New Road or Another Four Years
First, Marianne Russ digs into what another term with incumbent Republican Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger would mean for the Golden State. Then Jenny O’Mara examines what four years under Democrat Phil Angelides might be like.
11/6/2006
Listen

Voter Foundation Sets Propositions to Music
With all the propositions on the California ballot this year, it's hard to know Prop 1B from Prop 1E. The California Voter Foundation wrote a song to help voters keep them straight. Produced by the California Report.
11/6/2006
Listen

Opponent Uses Incumbency Against Democrat Hooley
Across the nation, Democrats are increasingly hopeful one negative headline after another for Republicans will help them win control of Congress. But in Oregon's 5th Congressional District, Republican candidate Mike Erickson is hoping he can use that same anti-incumbent feeling against Democrat Congresswoman Darlene Hooley. OPB's Colin Fogarty has more.
11/3/2006
Listen

Teaching Voting ABCs Boosts Youth Turnout
Nationwide, only 22 percent of 18- to 29-years-olds voted in the last mid-term election. Similar percentages hold for California. But in one California county, young people are going to the polls in record numbers. Ellen Ciurczak reports on a unique program that seems to be working.
11/3/2006
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank recalls a strange coincidence that brought 19th century botanist John Jeffery, Hudson's Bay Company employee James Hector and Frank himself together in the Canadian Rockies.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
11/3/2006
Listen

Quiet Campaigns for 'Superfluous' California Seat
On Election Day, Californians will vote for an office that Governor George Deukmejian considered of so little importance, he said it should be eliminated. This year, both the Democratic and Republican candidates for lieutenant governor say they plan to make their mark in the position. Ellen Ciurczak reports.
11/2/2006
Listen

To Market, To Market
As the growing season winds down, JPR's Jessica Robinson takes a trip through the sights, smells and sounds of one of the final Growers & Crafters Markets in the Rogue Valley. Production assistance on this story provided by Bob Binnewies.
11/2/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Return to Academia' by Diana Coogle
Washington Irving told the story of Rip Van Winkle, who woke up after 30 years to find his town a different place from the one he knew. Diana Coogle entered grad school this fall, and can relate.
Diana Coogle's latest book is "An Explosion of Stars."
11/2/2006
Listen

Challenging Walden
Carol Voisin, a university professor from Ashland, says she can revitalize rural Oregon. The Democrat is challenging Republican Congressman Greg Walden, the influential and popular representative of Oregon's vast 2nd Congressional District. JPR's Jessica Robinson meets the underdog.
11/1/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Milestones' by John Fisher-Smith
John Fisher-Smith watches his sons take on the roles he once held.
John Fisher-Smith is a writer living in Ashland.
11/1/2006
Listen

Oil and Tobacco: The Big Election Spenders
It’s estimated that roughly $200 million will be spent by those fighting for and against California's Propositions 86 and 87.  We have two reports on just what each would do -- and why so much money is being spent. First, Marianne Russ reports on Prop 86, the tobacco tax. Then, Jenny O’Mara will explore Prop 87, the oil tax.
10/31/2006
Listen

Watch the Skies for Flying Pumpkins
Pumpkins and Halloween go hand in hand. But what happens to all those leftover pumpkins that don’t get turned into Jack-o-lanterns or pie? At one Northwest farm, the pumpkins disappear into the horizon.  Correspondent Chris Lehman explains.
10/31/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'River Meanders' by Will Brophy
A straight line may be the most direct path, but it's not necessarily the best. Today, commentator Will Brophy describes the merits of meandering.
Will Brophy is a retired biology and botany professor who splits his time between Santa Cruz and Shingletown, Calif.
10/31/2006
Listen

Parties Turn Eyes Towards Oregon Legislature
The Oregon governor's race is coming down to the wire. But Democrats and Republicans are also keeping their eyes on the state legislature. As Salem Correspondent Chris Lehman reports, both parties have something to gain ... and something to lose.
10/30/2006
Listen

Running at 75
Bernard Scherrer has been running for about six decades. JPR's Bob Binnewies talks with the 75-year-old Rogue Valley marathon runner about keeping up the pace.
10/30/2006
Listen

Greens for God
Environmental issues are causing a growing number of Christians to question their traditional affiliation with the Republican Party. A church in the Pacific Northwest is at the forefront of this nationwide movement. And it’s in one of the reddest of red states: Idaho. Correspondent Elizabeth Wynne Johnson reports from Boise.
10/27/2006
Listen

Dagoba Sale to Hershey an 'Emotional' Move
Nationally recognized Dagoba Organic Chocolate Company of Ashland has announced it's becoming part of The Hershey Company. JPR's Jessica Robinson interviews Dagoba founder Frederick Schilling about the decision to sell, and where his environmentally minded company goes from here.
10/23/2006
Listen

Ashland Author Warns of Aquifer Limitations
Ashland resident William Ashworth, author of "Ogallala Blue" talks with JPR's Bob Binnewies about the depletion of the country's largest aquifer, and what the rest of the country can expect if nothing is done.
10/20/2006
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank recounts a tour in British Columbia that explored some of natural patterns associated with global warming.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
10/20/2006
Listen

Vagabond Opera Remakes Opera for New Audiences
The Pacific Northwest's Vagabond Opera has taken their classical music training and twisted it into a genre-defying mix of opera, cabaret, klezmer, Arabic, Bohemian and others. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with the troupe's tenor about making revered musical traditions more accessible.
10/19/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Differences' by Diana Coogle
They say home is where the heart is. Diana Coogle felt that sentiment all too clearly when she spent her first night away from home as a brand new grad student at the University of Oregon.
Diana Coogle's latest book is "An Explosion of Stars."
10/19/2006
Listen

Schools Prepare for Spread of Bird Flu
The California Department of Education is pushing districts to make sure they’re ready for a possible flu pandemic. That’s because schools are a front line of defense, as kids spread the flu quickly. But despite a flurry of planning by the state and local districts, some in the education community question whether it’s enough. Marianne Russ reports.
10/18/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Halfway to Cleveland' by Paula Bandy
Good stories sometimes lurk in unlikely places, as Paula Bandy recently discovered in the mountains between Klamath Falls and Ashland.
Paula Bandy is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
10/18/2006
Listen

Oregon Book Awards: Richard Moeschl
This year, the finalists for the Oregon Book Awards include two Ashland playwrights. Today, JPR's Jessica Robinson interviews Richard Moeschl about "Arthur's Dreams" and the discipline required to write theater.
10/17/2006
Listen

Campaign Finance Reformers Push Oregon Measures
Once again Oregonians will have a chance to vote on campaign financing this November. Ballot Measure 46 changes the Oregon constitution to allow laws regulating campaign contributions. Measure 47 actually creates the regulations. The measure limits contributions to candidates, and it bans corporations and unions from giving money to candidates, or spending it on their behalf. If Measure 46 fails, 47 is moot. OPB's Ley Garnett has this review of the issue.
10/17/2006
Listen

Oregon Book Awards: Molly Tinsley
This year, the finalists for the Oregon Book Awards include two Ashland playwrights. Today, JPR's Jessica Robinson interviews Molly Tinsley about her transition from writing for the page to writing for the stage. Her play "Fission" is about a little-known female nuclear physicist.
10/16/2006
Listen

Poop Power Could Be Next Energy Frontier
Machinery called a "digester" can turn poop into power. This fall, the biggest digesters built to date in the region go online. Correspondent Tom Banse reports from south-central Idaho.
10/16/2006
Listen

Hair Stylists Trained in Domestic Abuse Response
Women sometimes tell their hair dressers more than they'll tell a friend. JPR's Jessica Robinson reports on an effort to educate stylists on what to do when a woman confides that she's being abused.
10/13/2006
Listen

Learning Ecology Through Restoration
The Lomakatsi Restoration Project in Ashland, in collaboration with local schools, teaches students about the environment by giving them hands-on experience in restoring ecosystems. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with operations manager Marko Bey.
10/13/2006
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank takes a look at the roadside pest -- and sometimes mid-road pest -- that everyone loves to hate: the gray digger.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
10/13/2006
Listen

Garden v. Market
Looking at the cost of a seed packet, it would be reasonable to assume it’s cheaper to grow your own vegetables than buying them at the store or farmer’s market. But assumptions can be dangerous, as correspondent Cathy Duchamp discovered.
10/12/2006
Listen

Jubilee Celebrates Jazz in All its Forms
From Dixieland to the classic sound of New York night clubs, from zydeco to swing, jazz and the styles it’s inspired will be celebrated in the Medford this weekend. Medford’s annual Jazz Jubilee is one of many festivals across the country devoted to this uniquely American art form. JPR Arts Reporter Bob Davy has a preview.
10/12/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Leaving Home' by Diana Coogle
Diana Coogle left the Applegate for her new life as a graduate student at the University of Oregon last month. But things didn't quite go as planned.
Diana Coogle's latest book is "An Explosion of Stars."
10/12/2006
Listen

The Post-Fire Question
HR 4200 is a federal bill that comes directly out of our region. Congressman Greg Walden says he wants to streamline the forest recovery process after massive wildfires, like the one Southern Oregon experienced four years ago. JPR's Jessica Robinson looks at what the bill says, and what scientists, local loggers and firefighters are saying about it.
10/11/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Getting the Drift' John Fisher-Smith
In today’s commentary, a common autumn event reminds John Fisher-Smith of the worrisome human events that are becoming all too familiar.
John Fisher-Smith is a writer living in Ashland.
10/11/2006
Listen

Psychosynthesis and Ecopsychology
Some counselors are starting to look at not only emotional health, but also spiritual and ecological well-being in helping people. This is the approach used by Molly Young Brown of Mount Shasta, Calif. More accurately, the fields she works in are known as "psychosynthesis" and "ecopsychology." JPR's Bob Binnewies interviews Brown.
10/10/2006
Listen

Saxton Walks Fine Political Line on Abortion
Former New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani stumped in Portland this week for the Republican candidate for Oregon governor, Ron Saxton. Giuliani and Saxton share a rare position among Republican Party leaders -- they support abortion rights. As Colin Fogarty reports, it's not clear whether hard core anti-abortion voters will go along.
10/10/2006
Listen

Schwarzenegger and Angelides Spar in Sole Debate
Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and Democratic challenger Phil Angelides met in Sacramento over the weekend in the first and only California gubernatorial debate. Each tried to throw the other off balance over taxes, homeland security, education, and especially, the state of the middle class. JPR's Jessica Robinson recaps the exchange.
10/9/2006
Listen

3 Years After Recall, Gray Davis Takes it Easy
Gray Davis was ousted from the California governor's seat in a recall election three years ago this weekend. These days, his time is spent on political consultation, teaching and golf. John Myers of KQED's California Report checks in with Davis the private citizen.
10/9/2006
Listen

T'xwelatse, Soul-Force of a Tribe, Returns
A thousands-year old stone sculpture is making its way from a Seattle museum to British Columbia today. The four-foot granite figure is called T’xwelatse. Legend has it T’xwelatse was a man who was turned into stone after yelling at his wife. The lesson: always treat people with respect. Stolo Nation member Herb Joe was given the name T’xwelatse. With that, came the mission to find his tribe’s soul-force, which went missing for more than a hundred years. Here’s Herb Joe’s story, in his own words. (Produced by Cathy Duchamp)
10/9/2006
Listen

Six Years Later, Questions Still Encircle Monument
President Bill Clinton signed a proclamation in June 2000 that established the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument in Southern Oregon. Teresa Giacomini, chair of the Friends of the Cascade-Siskiyou National Monument, talks with JPR's Bob Binnewies about how the controversy this monument has progressed in the six years since its creation.
10/6/2006
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank takes on the botanical side of October's spooky traditions.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
10/6/2006
Listen

Walk This Way
Some school districts are trying a remedy for epidemic obesity in children that's straight out of their parents' childhoods: walking to school. JPR's Jessica Robinson goes for a early-morning stroll with a group of kids participating in an Ashland walking program.
10/4/2006
Listen

Northwest Coast Faces Development Boom
Some real estate market-watchers say the national housing bubble has burst. But on the Northwest coast it's a development boom and if the trend holds it promises to transform some coastal communities. Correspondent Austin Jenkins reports.
10/4/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Culinary Shame' Madeleine DeAndreis
Some people seek out restaurants for their fine offerings of food and wine, and meticulously grocery shop at farmers markets and specialty stores for the best ingredients. Madeleine DeAndreis is not one of those people. Today, she comes to terms with her “culinary shame.”
Madeleine DeAndreis is a writer and teacher living in Siskiyou County.
10/4/2006
Listen

Cranberry Growers Smiling Again
The cranberry harvest has begun. These ruby red berries grow in coastal peat bogs sprinkled between Bandon, Ore., and Vancouver, B.C. Seven years ago, Northwest cranberry growers were pushed to the brink by a crash in wholesale prices. But cranberries are again a hot commodity. Correspondent Tom Banse reports.
10/3/2006
Listen

Subtitles on Screen, Shasta's Peak in Distance
Jeffrey Winters founded the Mount Shasta International Film Festival three years ago to bring foreign and indie films to rural Northern California. JPR's Jessica Robinson interviews Winters about this year's line-up and the trends he's seeing in the industry.
10/3/2006
Listen

Seattle Lawyer Leads Food-Borne Illness Suits
If your kid gets E-Coli poisoning, who ya gonna call? These days people from across the country dial-up Seattle attorney Bill Marler. He's made his name suing the food industry to the tune of a quarter-billion dollars. As correspondent Austin Jenkins reports, he's going to bat for victims of the recent spinach E-coli outbreak.
10/2/2006
Listen

Chronicling the Northwest Coffee Kiosk Culture
Linda Sawyer, a former barista, wrote a guidebook to Northwest coffee called "Baristas Without Borders." Sawyer talks with JPR's Jessica Robinson about going on a road trip through Oregon and Washington where she stopped at every I-5 drive-through espresso stand -- that regional phenomenon known as the coffee kiosk.

"Baristas Without Borders" (Inkwater Press) is available at Mellelo Coffee Roasters in Medford, Flower Tyme in Ashland, Willow Creek in Phoenix, All About Oregon at the Rogue Valley Mall, Barnes & Noble and Amazon.com.
10/2/2006
Listen

Roadless Rule a Big Matter for the Little Guys
Forest protections under the 2001 Clinton Roadless Rule were heralded by the environmental community as landmark safeguards. JPR's Jessica Robinson gets the perspective of a local, family operated lumber company that the rule safeguards against. She talks with Jennifer Phillippi of Rough and Ready Lumber Company.
9/26/2006
Listen

Oil and Gas Companies Set Sights on Northwest
Energy companies are looking to Washington and Oregon. Geologists believe the Columbia River Basin may hold some of the largest undiscovered natural gas accumulations in the world. But as Correspondent Austin Jenkins reports, it won't be easy or cheap to tap.
9/26/2006
Listen

Exit Exam Puts Some Students Back in Class
The California high school seniors who didn't pass the newly implemented exit exam last year are heading back to the classroom for a second (or third or fourth) try. Kathryn Baron of KQED's California Report has more.
9/25/2006
Listen

Shostakovich Opens North State Symphony Season
North State Symphony conductor Kyle Wiley Pickett talks with JPR's Valerie Ing-Miller about the 2006-07 season. It opens this Saturday with a concert featuring the Fifth Symphony of Dmitri Shostakovich, who was born on this day 100 years ago.
9/25/2006
Listen

Judge Rejects Bush Move to Undo Forest Protections
In a blow to the Bush Administration, a federal judge today reinstated a rule that keeps logging, mining and drilling out of roadless areas of the national forests. JPR's Jessica Robinson interviews Wilderness Society legal analyst Mike Anderson about what this means for undeveloped forests in the region.
9/20/2006
Listen

The Game of Lumberjacks. And Lumberjills.
The know-how and skills of old-fashioned logging are being kept alive in the form of sport. It’s called Logger Sports, and it’s not just for lumberjacks. Lumber-Jills compete, too. Correspondent Elizabeth Wynne Johnson introduces us to a world-class logger athlete from Eastern Washington.
9/20/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'The Day After 9/11' John Fisher-Smith
The recent anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks made John Fisher-Smith long for a more peaceful, simpler time. He found some unexpected solace when he visited a local event in Ashland.
John Fisher-Smith is a writer living in Ashland.
9/20/2006
Listen

Study: 1 in 5 Oregon Jobs Don't Support a Family
The "2006 Job Gap Report" finds there aren't enough jobs that pay a living wage in Oregon. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with Gerald Smith, a research analyst with the Northwest Federation of Community Organizations.
9/19/2006
Listen

A Primer on Pirate Talk
Happy International Talk Like a Pirate Day! Brush up on your piratespeak with our short lesson, read by JPR's Raymond Scully.
9/19/2006
Listen

Roadless in Idaho
Idaho may break from its Northwest neighbors with a plan to allow some logging in roadless areas. Sadie Babits of Boise State Radio reports.
9/18/2006
Listen

Awards Highlight 'High School' Tone of Sacramento
The sometimes juvenile state politics in Sacramento now has its own awards. The Capitol Weekly newspaper hands out such honors as Best Dressed and Most Likely to Hold a Press Conference. (Reported by Jenny O'Mara)
9/18/2006
Listen

Mt. Ashland Takes Steps to Fight Climate Change
Mount Ashland Ski Area, with its white slops in mind, is offsetting all its electricity use with green energy. It's the first ski area in the Northwest to take that step. JPR's Jessica Robinson has the story. Meanwhile, as Tom Banse reports, ski areas may have a more immediate problem than global warming: El Nińo.
9/15/2006
Listen

Volunteers to Cleanup Oregon's Coastline Saturday
Oregon's beaches may be untouched by development, but they aren't untouched by trash. This weekend, thousands of Oregonians are expected to turn out to pick up the garbage that collects on their prized coastline. JPR's Jessica Robinson interviews the leader for the Bandon area cleanup, Pamela Stevens.
9/15/2006
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank recalls how it was instilled in him at an early age that an introduced species of sparrow is bad news.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
9/15/2006
Listen

Bill Rauch to Take Reins of Shakespeare Festival
Bill Rauch has been named the next artistic director of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with Rauch about the approach he takes to Shakespearean theater and where he’d like to lead the renowned theater company.
9/14/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Weeding Crater Lake' by Diana Coogle
Perfect days come along rarely, but one recently came along for Diana Coogle at Crater Lake National Park.
Diana Coogle's latest book is "An Explosion of Stars."
9/14/2006
Listen

Newly Minted California Laws Target Kids' Obesity
California’s former body-builder governor signed legislation yesterday that promotes nutrition and fitness for kids. As JPR’s Jessica Robinson reports, Schwarzenegger’s move is part of growing effort to address the growing size of American children.
9/13/2006
Listen

For Nutrition, 'Your Body Knows Best'
JPR's Bob Binnewies interviews Dr. Paul Buck, a nutritionist in Ashland and professor emeritus at Cornell University.
9/13/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Platitudes' by Madeleine DeAndreis
Madeleine DeAndreis shares a few thoughts on the finer points of making small talk and policy.
Madeleine DeAndreis is a writer and teacher living in Siskiyou County.
9/13/2006
Listen

'Hat Tricks' Finds the Drama, Comedy in Seniorhood
A new comedy by an Ashland playwright creates something of a rarity in theater: nuanced roles for older women. JPR's Jessica Robinson interviews 'Hat Tricks' writer Dori Appel and director Carolyn Myers.
9/12/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Aging Gracefully' by Daniel Latham
Aging gracefully is something Daniel Latham is trying to figure out. Lately, he's found inspiration in his best friend.
Daniel Latham is a caregiver for adults with developmental disabilities. He lives in Medford.
9/12/2006
Listen

Remembering Life in the Twin Towers
The terrorist attack on the nation five years ago is both an event, and a personal story for every American. We hear how the events of 9-11 affected one man who once went to the World Trade Center every day for work. JPR's Jessica Robinson interviews Chuck Frumerie, who now lives in Mount Shasta.
9/11/2006
Listen

Casting Agency Gets the Real Thing for Gang Roles
A former California gang member is bringing a new level of authenticity to type-casting. Suspect Entertainment is Hollywood’s premier gangster casting agency. Rob Schmitz of KQED's California Report has more.
9/11/2006
Listen

Attorneys General Ask Hollywood to Address Smoking
The attorneys general of California and Oregon say movies are to blame in part for teen smoking, and are calling on studios to include PSAs on DVDs. JPR's Jessica Robinson reports.
9/8/2006
Listen

Campaign Asks Rogue Valley to Eat Local for a Week
A campaign that kicks off this weekend asks Rogue Valley residents to look close to home when preparing their next meal. JPR's Jessica Robinson talks with Wendy Siporen of Thrive about Eat Local Week, and the challenge it makes to locals.
9/8/2006
Listen

Nature Notes with Dr. Frank Lang
Frank explains a phenomenon that happens right before the sun sets over the ocean, and an incident in which he confused two fish from the sea.
Dr. Frank Lang is professor emeritus of biology at Southern Oregon University. His book, "A Nature Notes Sampler," is published by Jefferson Public Radio.
9/8/2006
Listen

'Omnivore's Dilemma' Connects World Crises to Food
Michael Pollan, a UC-Berkeley professor, proposes that many of the world's problems can be traced back to the dinner table in his new book "The Omnivore's Dilemma." Pollan talks with Scott Shafer of KQED's California Report.
9/7/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Josephine Creek Lodge' Diana Coogle
It's a lucky tourist whose hosts make her feel like she isn't one. Diana Coogle was just so lucky in the heart of the Trinity Alps.
Diana Coogle's latest book is "An Explosion of Stars."
9/7/2006
Listen

Oregon Task Force Looks into Gay Rights
Oregon is asking the public about the state of equality for its gay, lesbian and transgender citizens. JPR's Jessica Robinson reports.
9/7/2006
Listen

Blogs Bring New Dimension to Print Journalism
The Internet blog has been the medium of the citizen journalist. Now, many newspapers are beefing up their websites with staff blogs. JPR's Jessica Robinson interviews Kelly Brewer, editor of the Redding Record Searchlight, about what changes this has meant for her paper, and how blogs can benefit the community.
9/6/2006
Listen

Commentary: 'Birding and the Bard' Bandy Hickman
Paula Bandy Hickman sends an audio post card from a Shakespeare-themed birding adventure in the Klamath Basin.
Paula Bandy Hickman is a writer living in the Klamath Basin.
9/6/2006
Listen

Harry & David Goes Organic
Harry and David, Southern Oregon's famed gourmet fruit grower and one of the region's largest employers, will offer organic pears for the first time