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2003 Jefferson Exchange Guest Information

Wednesday, Jan. 1: Happy New Year! Archive programs: 8-9: The consequences of rapid population growth around the world and in the U.S. The guest is Werner Fornos, President of the Population Institute. 9-10: Successful mission driven documentary film-making with John DeGraaf, creator of the film, "Affluenza". Both programs were recorded in February, 2002.

Thursday, Jan. 2: The beliefs and values that have shaped America. The guest is Jacob Needleman, author of The American Soul: Rediscovering the Wisdom of the Founding Fathers. Needleman is also the author of Money and the Meaning of Life.

Friday, Jan. 3: A British playwright's view of the American political system. The guest is David Edgar, considered one of the world's foremost writers of political theater. Beginning in February, the Oregon Shakespeare Festival in Ashland is presenting Continental Divide, a world premiere of a two play cycle by Edgar. In Daughters of the Revolution, a college professor receives his FBI files as a gag gift from his wife. In Mother's Against, a Republican candidate must make a political choice between his ideals and almost certain victory.

Monday, Jan. 6: A challenge to cynicism and powerlessness. The guest is Sarah Van Gelder, co-founder of the Positive Futures Network and YES! Magazine. She has edited a weekly energy publication and served as a consultant to the start-up of China Central Television's English news service. Van Gelder has also lived in India and Central America.

Tuesday, Jan. 7: The enduring power of rivers and fish and the haunting memories of childhood. The guest is David James Duncan, author of the bestselling novels The River Why and The Brother's K, and a collection of non-fiction, My Story as Told by Water.

Wednesday, Jan. 8: Political satire and the debunking of corporate media "doublespeak". The guest is Wayne Grytting, author of American Newspeak: the Mangling of Meaning for Power and Profit.

Thursday, Jan. 9: Civil rights, industry regulation, and government accountability. The guest is constitutional attorney Daniel Sheehan, chief counsel for cases such as the Pentagon Papers, Iran-Contra, and Three Mile Island. Sheehan recently served as chief legal counsel for the Disclosure Project; an organization seeking a broader public inquiry into government knowlege of UFO's.

Friday, Jan. 10: Looking for solutions to maintain our quality of life and environment with Gloria Flora and Dr. Gayle Hudgens. Gloria Flora was a supervisor of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest in Nevada during the "land wars" of the late 1990's. Flora now directs Sustainable Obtainable Solutions, a non-profit dedicated to the sustainability of public lands. Hudgens is the author of Collaborative Spunk: The Feisty Guide to Reviving People and Our Planet.

Monday, Jan. 13: Biodiesel, made from vegetable oil or animal tallow, is the fastest growing alternative fuel in the country, according to the National Biodiesel Board, a nonprofit trade group. The guest is Tomas Endicott with SeQuential Biofuels in Eugene. Endicott is part of a team of entreprenuers promoting and distributing biodiesel in Oregon. Today's program is from KRVM-AM Eugene.

Tuesday, Jan. 14: Shifting away from the standard business decision-making model of "risk assessment". The guest is Mary O'Brien, a scientist with the Environmental Research Foundation and author of Making Better Environmental Decisions: An Alternative to Risk Assessment. Recently O'Brien served as an expert court witness challenging the proposal to incinerate chemical and nerve gas weapons in northeastern Oregon. Today's program originates for KRVM-AM 1280 in Eugene.

Wednesday, Jan. 15: Various guests discuss Oregon ballot measure 28.

Thursday, Jan. 16: Developing moral courage for community involvement and citizen activism. The guest is Paul Rogat Loeb, author of Soul of a Citizen: Living With Conviction in a Cynical Time.

Friday, Jan. 17 : Storyteller and blues musician Guy Davis is the guest. On January 17 Davis will perform In Bed With the Blues: the adventures of Fishy Waters. The one-man show at the Unitarian Center in Ashland, 8 p.m., is part of the Third Annual Rogue Valley Blues Festival. (Info: 535-3562). Guy Davis is the son of Ruby Dee and Ozzie Davis. He has 5 recordings on the Red House label and has been nominated for several WC Handy Awards.

Monday, Jan. 20: Open phones discussion of peace protests and the observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day.

Tuesday, Jan. 21: Ending the cycle of human violence with Derrick Jensen, author of The Culture of Make Believe and A Language Older Than Words.

Wednesday, Jan. 22: Examining the war on terrorism at home and abroad. The guest is James Adams, Co-founder and Chairman of iDefense, a cyber-intelligence and risk-management firm. Adams serves on the National Security Agency Advisory Board and is the author of The Next World War: Computers Are the Weapons and the Front Line Is Everywhere.

Thursday, Jan. 23: Demystifying love: where it comes from, how it effects our minds and bodies. The guest is Thomas Lewis, a San Francisco psychiatrist and the co-author of The General Theory of Love.

Friday, Jan. 24: The mastery of Zen and how the ancient legacy of Chinese philosophy makes its way in the modern world. Andy Ferguson is a frequent visitor to China and the author and translator of Zen's Chinese Heritage: The Masters and their Teachings.

Monday, Jan. 27: A legislative look at Oregon budget issues, including PERS and the tax increasing ballot Measure 28. Scheduled guests include Sen. Tony Corcoran, Sen. Jason Atkinson, and Rep. Alan Bates.

Tuesday, Jan. 28: The future of money and the declining value standard for the U.S. dollar. The guest is Will Reishman, a licensed broker with Euro Pacific Capital in Medford.

Wednesday, Jan. 29: The joys, challenges, and legalities of cohabitation with Dorian Solot and Marshall Miller. Solot and Miller are the founders of the Alternatives to Marriage Project and the authors of Unmarried to Each Other: The Essential Guide to Living Together as an Unmarried Couple.

Thursday, Jan. 30: A passion for the musical legacy of the Beatles. The guest is Dave Marston, who performs a one-man show, The Essence of Lennon.

Friday, Jan. 31:Business and industry strategies for jump-starting the economy. The guest is Richard Butrick, President of Associated Oregon Industries.

Monday, Feb. 3: Peace activism and finding common goals with the citizens of Iraq and Cuba. Gloria La Riva is with the International Action Center, based in San Francisco. La Riva chronicled a challenge of the medicine sanctions on Iraq in her video, Let Iraq Live.

Tuesday, Feb. 4: "Buy nothing day", "TV turn-off week", and "commercial free schools" are all campaigns of Adbusters, an organization that also creates spoof advertisements. Kalle Lasn is the publisher and founder of Adbusters Media Foundation (and its magazine). Lasn also founded culturejammers.org.

Wednesday, Feb. 5: Free trade agreements and what they mean for economies and workers in Mexico and the U.S. Guests are Jessica Marques of the Mexican Solidarity Network and Dan Griswold, Associate Director of the Center for Trade Policy Studies at the CATO Institute. The guest host is Geoffrey Riley.

Thursday, Feb. 6: The importance of individual freedom, personal property rights, limited taxation, and other "guarantees" of the U.S. Constitution. The guest is George Landrith, Director of Frontiers of Freedom. The non-profit advocacy group was founded in 1995 by former Sen. Malcolm Wallop, a Wyoming Republican. The guest host is Geoffrey Riley.

Friday, Feb. 7: The evolution and psychology of male bonding, violence and warfare. The guest is Michael Ghiglieri, author of The Dark Side of Man. The guest host is Geoffrey Riley.

Monday, Feb. 10: A freewheeeling discussion on economic stimulus, the pending war with Iraq and other current issues. The guest is Congressman Peter DeFazio, the Democratic Representative from the 4th District of Oregon. Today's program is originating from KRVM-AM in Eugene. The guest host is Danuta Pfeiffer. Call in lines today are 687-5786 and 1-800-285-2895.

Tuesday, Feb. 11: Finding community and family solutions to the growing problems of date rape and domestic violence. The guest is Margo Schaefer, Community Outreach Director of WomenSpace Domestic Violence Services in Eugene. Today's program is originating from KRVM-AM in Eugene. The guest host is Danuta Pfeiffer. Call in lines today are 687-5786 and 1-800-285-2895.

Wednesday, Feb. 12: The fear and reality of biological weapons and the progress toward toward international disarmament. The guest is Susan Wright, a senior research fellow at the UN Institute for Disarmament Research and author of Preventing a Biological Arms Race. The guest host is Geoffrey Riley.

Thursday, Feb. 13: Ideas for cross-border partnerships between Southern Oregon and Northern California. Those currently under discussion include a regional airport and air-service connecting Del Norte county in California with Curry, Josephine, and Jackson Counties in Oregon. Also, a tunnel proposal as a way to fix the frequent closures and delays on Highway 199 connecting the Rogue Valley to the coast. The guest is Chuck Blackburn, Del Norte California County Supervisor. The guest host is Geoffrey Riley.

Friday, Feb. 14: What is happening to romance? An exploration of the new mating culture and the social climate for courtship. The guest is Barbara Whitehead, author of Why There Are No Good Men Left: The Romantic Plight of the New Single Woman. The guest host is Geoffrey Riley.

Monday, Feb. 17: America's policy in the Persian Gulf and managing coalitions in the confrontation with Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein. The guest is Dr. Stephen Pelletiere author of Iraq and the International Oil System: Why America Went to War in the Persian Gulf. The guest host is Geoffrey Riley.

Tuesday, Feb. 18: Reporting on the realities of war and reflections on the myths of war. The guest is New York Times reporter Chris Hedges, author of War is a Force That Gives Us Meaning. The guest host is Geoffrey Riley.

Wednesday, Feb. 19: How some Fortune 500 companies are integrating sustainability strategies into their global corporate initiatives. The guest is George Basile, Executive Vice President and Senior Scientist with the Natural Step, a non-profit and advisory organization. Basile has advised Natural Step concepts with companies such as Home Depot, McDonald's, and Bank of America. The guest host is Geoffrey Riley.

Thursday, Feb. 20: The growth of "anti-Europeanism" in the U.S. and the significance of sagging relations between the United States and some European countries. The guest is Alistair Millar, vice president of the Fourth Freedom Forum, an independent research organization promoting awareness of global security issues. Before joining the Forum, Millar was a senior analyst at the British American Security Information Council (BASIC) where he focused on European security issues. The guest host is Geoffrey Riley.

Friday, Feb. 21: The sobering lessons of globalization and the rippling effects of "exporting democracy". The guest is Amy Chua, Professor of Law at Yale, and the author of World On Fire: How Exporting Free Market Democracy Breeds Ethnic Hatred and Global Instability. Salon article. The guest host is Geoffrey Riley.

Monday, Feb. 24: Health through talk and touch; 35 years of practicing body-mind healing techniques with Ilana
Rubenfeld
, author of The Listening Hand.

Tuesday, Feb. 25: Why is there hunger? The politics and economics of food and world hunger. Today's guest is Francis Moore Lappe, author of the three million copy bestseller, Diet for a Small Planet and co-author with her daughter of Hope's
Edge.

Wednesday, Feb. 26: The hazards of the nuclear age and the growing dangers of worldwide militarization. The guest is Dr. Helen Caldicott, founder of Physicians for Social Responsibility.

Thursday, Feb. 27: What's high on your risk meter? Staying safe and keeping risks in perspective. The guest is David Ropeik, Director of Risk Assesment at the Harvard Center and co-author of Risk: A Practical Guide for Deciding What's Really Safe and What's Really Dangerous in the
World Around You
.

Friday, Feb. 28: The enormous challenges and rewards of raising "special needs" children. The guest is Susan Tom of Fairfield, California. Her life with 11 adopted children was documented in My Flesh and Blood, winner of the audience award for best documentary at this year's Sundance
Film Festival. Among Tom's 11 children depicted in the film are two legless daughters who love bouncing on a trampoline, a daughter disfigured from burns, a son suffering from a possibly lethal skin disease, and a 15-year-old bully, Joe, with cystic fibrosis.

Monday, March 3: Adoption and the search for a birth mother told from two perspectives: a searching daughter and a found mother. Guests are Patricia Florin, found by the daughter she gave up for adoption 16 years earlier, and Jennifer Minniti, author of Baby Girl Jensen: a Memoir of My Reunion with My Birth Mother. Minniti's story begins with her youth, knowing nothing of her heritage and her birth parents. Florin was an advocate for measure 58 in Oregon (passed in 1998), which granted adoptees access to their original birth certificates when they turn 21.

Tuesday, March 4: Environmental law; from preserving pristine landscapes to restoring damaged ones, and working on behalf of communities threatened by environmental degradation.
The guest is Tom Turner, a senior editor with
Earthjustice, and the author of Sierra Club: 100 Years of Protecting Nature and a new book, Justice on Earth; Earthjustice and the People It Has Served.

Wednesday, March 5: Freedom of the press and freedom of expression: how are these First Amendment rights faring in America today? The guest is Gene Policinski with the First Amendment Center at Vanderbilt University in Tennessee. Policinski is the keynote speaker at the 2003 Thomas Pyle First Amendment Forum at Southern Oregon University, March 5, at 7 p.m. in the Stevenson Student Union.

Thursday, March 6: Exploring our current national crises: pre-emptive war, threats to civil rights, and the collapse of funding for social services. A series of forums on these issues are ongoing in Southern Oregon. Guests will include Paul Robinson, Minister at the United Church of Christ-Congregational in Medford.

Friday, March 7: The United Nations under scrutiny. How are they carrying out their mandate and what is the effect of pressure from the United States? The guest is James Paul, Director of the Global Policy Forum, which monitors the U.N.

Monday, March 10: Severe cutbacks in funding are changing the classroom experience. The guest is Jennifer Hillis, a teacher in Medford.

Tuesday, March 11: Pushing for progressive change in Oregon on issues such as education, the environment, economic reform, elections, and health care. The guest is Jeff Smith, Chairman of the Oregon Bus Project and Chair of the New Progressive Network.

Wednesday, March 12: The new Homeland Security Dept. from a police point of view. Is it effective counterterrorism or unnecessary bureaucracy? The guest is Jim Kouri, Vice President for the National Association of Chiefs of Police. Kouri has authored two books: Crime Talk: Conversations with America's Top Crimefighters, and Assume the Position: Police Science for Novelists, Screenwriters and Journalists.

Thursday, March 13: Impending war with Iraq and the media spin. The guest is Reese Erlich, co-author of Target Iraq: What the News Media Didn't Tell You.

Friday, March 14: The welfare to work program and job re-training. How well is it working? The guest is Gordon Lafer with the Labor Education Research Center at the University of Oregon. Lafer has a Ph.D. in Political Science from Yale, and is the author of The Job Training Charade.

Monday, March 17: Shakespeare and war. The guests are Alan Armstrong, Director at the Center for Shakespeare Studies at Southern Oregon University, and Michael Jasperson, a retired Naval Academy professor who has taught Shakespeare for over thirty years.

Tuesday, March 18: Considered one of the greatest scientists of the 20th century, Dr. Linus Pauling (1901-1994) is the only person ever to receive two unshared Nobel Prizes; for Chemistry (1954) and for Peace (1962). His controversial work extolling the benefits of Vitamin C became widely known through a 1970 bestseller, Vitamin C and the Common Cold. To reflect on this famous Oregonian, the guests are Tom Hager, author of Linus Pauling and the Chemistry of Life, and Stephen Lawson with the Linus Pauling Institute.

Wednesday, March 19: New solutions to many long-standing problems and opportunities to revitalize democracy. The guest is Jim Rough, author of Society's Breakthrough! Releasing Essential Wisdom and Virtue in All the People.

Thursday, March 20: Creating television documentaries and public affairs programming. The guest is Ben Saboonchian, senior documentary producer for KIRO-TV, CBS in Seattle. Over 23 years, Saboonchian has made 31 documentaries including War of the Woods, The Last Stand, a look at the great timber disputes in the Pacific Northwest. Saboonchian will show several films in Ashland Saturday, March 21 as part of the Siskiyou Environmental Film Festival. To register or reserve by phone or email contact Barry Snitkin at 541-592-4459, barry@siskiyou.org.

Friday, March 21: Spiritual films and the Acadamy Awards with Stephen Simon, author of The Force is With You: Mystical Movie Messages That Inspire Our Lives.

Monday, March 24: The question of fluoridation, and dental health: should communities add fluoride to the drinking water? Guests include Dr. Lee Sharp, a Roseburg dentist and Jeff Green, national director for Citizens for Safe Drinking Water.

A dental site in favor of fluoridation.

Information against fluoridation.

Tuesday, March 25: Open phones on Iraq.

Wednesday, March 26: The guest is Zaineb Istrabadi, Associate Director of the Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies Program at Indiana University, Bloomington. She is an Iraqi-American woman who is very well informed about conditions in Iraq and has relatives there.

Thursday, March 27: Sanctions, oil, and delivering humanitarian assistance to the people of Iraq. The guest is Denis Halliday, former head of the Food for Oil program in Iraq and a former UN Assistant Secretary General. A Salon.com interview.

Friday, March 28: A new look at how recognition, or its absence, affects nearly everyone. The guest is Robert W. Fuller, former president of Oberlin College, and the author of Somebodies and Nobodies; Overcoming the Abuse of Rank.

Monday, March 31: Universal access to health care. The guest is Dr. Deb Richter, a family physician in Montpelier, Vermont and past president of Physicians for a National Health Plan.

Tuesday, April 1: Alpha brain waves, neurofeedback and how they can affect creativity, awareness and intelligence. The guest is Dr. Jim Hardt , a psychologist with over thirty years of research in feedback and brain enhancement. Hardt is the founder of the Biocybernaut Institute

Wednesday, April 2: Healing emotional suffering and finding paths to emotional maturity with Daniel Barron. Barron is the inventor of Emotive Subself Healing (ESH) Therapy.

Thursday, April 3: The Oregon Cultural Trust and the tax credit for the arts: can funding for the arts survive the downturn in the state's economy? Guests will include Ross Mckeen, Executive Director of the Oregon Cultural Trust, Lyn Godsey, Director of the Arts Council of Southern Oregon, and Senator Bev Clarno, R-Redmond.

Friday, April 4: Investigative journalism with Greg Palast, author of The Best Democracy Money Can Buy. Palast extensively research the purging of citizens from voter rolls in Florida and how that influenced the 2000 presidential election. Palast reports for the Guardian and the Observer in London as well as the BBC.

Monday, April 7: In this time, in this place: reflections on what it means to be a human being. Guests are Nancy Parker, author of The Omega Transmissions, and Richard Moeschl, astronomer and director of the Horizon Institute in Ashland.

Tuesday, April 8: Dealing with stress and anxiety, and finding ways to improve mental health. Guests include Dr. Les Garwood, a staff psychiatrist at the Rogue Valley Medical Center and Michelle Martin, a counselor and therapist practicing in Ashland.

Wednesday, April 9: Health conditions and facilities inside Iraq. The guest is Dr. Charles Clements. He was part of a group of six doctors who toured eight Iraqi cities in January. They went to hospitals as well as clinics, water treatment plants and electrical installations to assess health conditions. Clements is a Vietnam War veteran and former President of
Physicians for Human Rights, one of several organizations awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for the fight to ban land mines worldwide.

Thursday, April 10: Tracking mystery diseases, viruses, and other threats to public health. The guest is Dr. Stephen S. Morse at Columbia University in New York. Morse is director of the Center for Public Health Preparedness at the Mailman School of Public Health. He is the author of Emerging Viruses (selected by "American Scientist" for its list of "100 Top Science Books of the Century"), and The Evolutionary Biology of Viruses.

Friday, April 11: Beyond "Cowboy music"; original and traditional western folk music with Lorraine Rawls. Rawls lives in the Rogue Valley and is the winner of the prestigious Will Rogers Award for Excellence in Western Music.

Monday, April 14: Post-war military strategy in Iraq and the Middle East. The guest is Dan Smith, a retired U.S. Army Colonel and a military affairs analyst for the non-profit group Foreign Policy In Focus.

Tuesday, April 15: The most pressing environmental and social problems now directing land use management decisions. The guest is Michael Dombeck, former chief of the U.S. Forest Service and former director of the Bureau of Land Management. Dombeck is the co-author of From Conquest to Conservation: Our Public Lands Legacy. He is now teaches global environmental management at the University of Wisconsin.

Wednesday, April 16: Vegetarian nutrition and food safety. The guest is Dr. Michael Greger, an investigator of "mad cow disease". Greger debated the National Cattlemen's Beef Association Director before the FDA and was invited as an expert witness to defend Oprah Winfrey in the infamous "meat defamation trial.". He is author of Heart Failure: Diary of a Third Year Medical Student.

Thursday, April 17: Tracking world opinion (and U.S. thinking) on developments in Iraq and throughout the Middle East. The guest is Chris Toensing, an Arabic speaker and editor of Middle East Report, the quarterly magazine of the Middle East Research and Information Project (MERIP).

Friday, April 18: Boom and bust for timber; growing up in Hilt. Writer Louise Wagenknecht grew up in one of the West's last company lumber towns, a small community called Hilt on the Oregon-California border. There she witnessed the the end of the 1950's lumber boom. Her evocative memoir and history of Hilt is called White Poplar, Black Locust.

Monday, April 21: Strategies for a more peaceful world. The guest is Gayle Landt, Executive Director of Beyond War 2003. Today's program is broadcast from KRVM-AM in Eugene. Call in lines: 1-800 285 2895 and (541) 687-5786.

Tuesday, April 22: Empowering women and girls for self defense and for surviving domestic violence. The guest is Nadia Telsey, author/director of Self Defense from the Inside Out, a workbook and series of classes for transforming the way women live. Telsey is also the founder of Breaking Free in Eugene, an organization promoting healing for Latinas, survivors of domestic violence, incarcerated women, and girls. Today's program is broadcast live from KRVM-AM in Eugene. Call in lines: 1-800 285 2895 and 541 687-5786.

Wednesday, April 23: Sex and sexuality: reshaping the ways society and parents convey images and information to children, from toddlers to 20-year-olds. The guest is Deborah Roffman, author of Sex and Sensibility: The Thinking Parent's Guide to Talking Sense About Sex, and But How Did I Get In There: Talking to Your Young Child About Sex.

Thursday, April 24: The science, passion, and recreation of birding. Guests include ornithologist John Alexander of the Klamath Bird Observatory (located in Ashland) and Gwyneth Ragosine, president of the Rogue Valley Audubon Society.

Friday, April 25: Defining terrorism; also, why is violence the predominant response to acts of terror? The guest is Beau Grosscup, Professor of International Relations, CSU Chico, and the author of The Newest Explosions of Terrorism.

Monday, April 28: Saving the marriage; solving relationship issues. The guest is Michele Weiner-Davis, author of The Sex Starved Marriage. Weiner-Davis believes that the vast majority of marital break-ups in our country are unnecessary because most relationship problems are solvable.

Tuesday, April 29: Nathan Jacobi, a holocaust survivor, is the guest for Holocaust Remembrance Day.

Wednesday, April 30: "The father of environmental ethics", Holmes Rolston is the guest. Holmes Rolston, a Professor of Philosophy at Colorado State University, writes and lectures on the religious imperative to respect nature. Rolston was recently named the 2003 Templeton Prize laureate. (The prize is valued at more than one million dollars).

Thursday, May 1: Raising awareness for the welfare and ethical treatment of animals, including a look at practices of the fast-food industry. Guests include Priscilla Feral, Director of Friends of Animals and a representative from People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA).

Friday, May 2: Master gardening and spreading love around in Watts, in South Central Los Angeles. The guest is Anna Marie Carter, known as "the Seed Lady of Watts". Carter builds free, organic gardens for people who suffer from HIV/AIDS, cancer, obesity, and other illnesses. Carter's commentary in Yes Magazine.

Monday, May 5: Women, the military, and world wide trends in feminism. The guest is Gwyn Kirk, a leader of an international group in San Francisco called "East Asia, US & Puerto Rican Women's Network Against Militarism". . She is currently a visiting professor at the Women & Gender Studies Department at the University of Oregon, teaching a course on feminism and militarism. Kirk is also a presenter at the next meeting of the Lane County Women's Actions for New Directions (WAND). The program, "Rethinking Security in a Time of War: Women's Perspectives" is Thursday, May 8, 7-9pm at the McNeil-Reilly House, 601 W. 13th in Eugene. (More info: (541) 342-5235.

Tuesday, May 6: Pros and cons of medical use of marijuana. Guests include Dr. Jon Gell, Medical Director at RVMC / Providence Hospitals and a board member of Southern Oregon Drug Awareness; also Dr. Rick Bayer, co-author of Is Marijuana the Right Medicine For You? A Factual Guide to Medical Uses of Marijuana. He was a chief petitioner for the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act in 1998.

Wednesday, May 7: When he was four years old, Mawi Asgedom's family left their war-ravaged home in Ethiopia. They spent three years in a Sudanese refugee camp before coming to the U.S. in 1983, where they were settled by World Relief in a wealthy white suburb near Chicago. Asgedom later earned a full scholarship to Harvard, where in 1999 he delivered the commencement address. An earnest account of Asgedom's life up to his graduation from Harvard is told in his book, Of Beetles & Angels: A Boy's Remarkable Journey from a Refugee Camp to Harvard.

Thursday, May 8: The challenges of sustaining affordable housing. Guests are Anne Williams, Director of Housing Development for St Vincent de Paul, in Lane County;
Ron Demele, Director of the Rogue Valley Community Development Corporation, and realtor Jennifer Henderson with the Ashland Community Land Trust.

Friday, May 2: Educational challenges: keeping academics rigorous while teaching to state and national standards. The guest is Patty Kinney, Principal of Talent Middle School. Kinney was recently named the MetLife/NASSP Middle Level Principal of the Year. She is the keynote speaker May 16 at the Possibilities in Education Conference May 16, 17 at Southern Oregon University.

Monday, May 5: Women, the military, and world wide trends in feminism. The guest is Gwyn Kirk, a visiting professor at the Women & Gender Studies Department at the University of Oregon.

Tuesday, May 6: Pros and cons of medical use of marijuana. Guests include Dr. Jon Gell, Medical Director at RVMC / Providence Hospitals and a board member of Southern Oregon Drug Awareness; also Dr. Rick Bayer, co-author of Is Marijuana the Right Medicine For You? A Factual Guide to Medical Uses of Marijuana. He was a chief petitioner for the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act in 1998.

Wednesday, May 7: When he was four years old, Mawi Asgedom's family left their war-ravaged home in Ethiopia. They spent three years in a Sudanese refugee camp before coming to the U.S. in 1983, where they were settled by World Relief in a wealthy white suburb near Chicago. Asgedom later earned a full scholarship to Harvard, where in 1999 he delivered the commencement address. An earnest account of Asgedom's life up to his graduation from Harvard is told in his book, Of Beetles & Angels: A Boy's Remarkable Journey from a Refugee Camp to Harvard.

Thursday, May 8: The challenges of sustaining affordable housing. Guests are Anne Williams, Director of Housing Development for St Vincent de Paul, in Lane County;
Ron Demele, Director of the Rogue Valley Community Development Corporation, and realtor Jennifer Henderson with the Ashland Community Land Trust.

Friday, May 9: Educational challenges: keeping academics rigorous while teaching to state and national standards. The guest is Patty Kinney, Principal of Talent Middle School. Kinney was recently named the MetLife/NASSP Middle Level Principal of the Year. She is the keynote speaker May 16 at the Possibilities in Education Conference May 16, 17 at Southern Oregon University. Information: (541) 472-8447.

Monday, May 12: Myths and mysteries surrounding Pacific archeological sites and the huge stone statues found on Easter Island. Jo Anne Van Tilburg is the Director of the Easter Island Statue Project and is the author of Among Stone Giants: The Life of Katherine Routledge and her Remarkable Expedition to Easter Island.

Tuesday, May 13: Improving personal and business relationships by understanding personality types. The guest is Bill Gallagher, a pastoral counselor and motivational speaker. Gallagher conducts a seminar titled "Understanding Personality Differences at Home and in the Workplace".

Wednesday, May 14: Reshaping society on a smaller scale and reducing or eliminating dependence on oil as an energy source. The guest is Richard Heinberg, author of The Party's Over: Oil, War and the Fate of Industrial Societies. Heinberg recently presented a lecture, "Growth, Scale, and Social Power: A Global Perspective".

Thursday, May 15: The aftermath of last summer's gigantic fires in Southern Oregon and a reconsideration of future forest and wild-fire management. The guests are Professor Cathy Whitlock, Geography Department Chair at the University of Oregon, and Tom Atzet, a U.S. Forest Service ecologist for southwestern Oregon. Biscuit fire follow-up from Siskiyou and Rogue River National Forests.

Friday, May 16: Is a truly democratic world possible? The guest is John Bodley, Professor of Anthropology at Washington State University, and author of two textbooks, Victims of Progress and Anthropology and Contemporary Human Problems.

Monday, May 19: The chaos, joy, and humorous challenges of becoming the father of triplets. The guest is Bruce Stockler, author of I Sleep at Red Lights, A True Story of Life after Triplets. Bruce Stockler is a widely published journalist and was also a joke writer for Jay Leno's monologue. His humor column, Crazy Talk, runs every other month in Esquire.

Tuesday, May 20: Exploring the relationship between global ecology and information technology. The guest is Jim Fournier, founder of Planetwork Inc., a non-profit organization dedicated to exploring ways that information technology can help create a sustainable future.

Wednesday, May 21: Techno-thriller suspense fiction that sometimes foretells the future. The guest is Dean Ing, a former research engineer in the aerospace industry and the author of numerous novels, including The Ransom of Black Stealth One and The Skins of Dead Men.

Thursday, May 22: Questioning technological ethics in a world addicted to progress. The guest is Bill McKibben, best known for his 1989 book, The End of Nature. McKibben has written a series of essays about the far-reaching effects of advanced technologies. The collection is called Enough: Staying Human in an Engineered Age.

Friday, May 23: Textbook censorship, political correctness, and the re-writing of information for the classroom. The guest is Diane Ravitch, author of The Language Police; How Pressure Groups Restrict What Children Learn.

Monday, May 26: A holiday archive program. 8-9: Dr. Ami Mezahav talks about diaspora, the phenomenon of people moving from place to place; 9-10: David Edgar, playwright of Continental Divide at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. Edgar discusses the political differences between England and the U.S.

Tuesday, May 27: The growth of regional and community efforts to support small locally owned businesses. Guests include Wendy Siporen, coordinator of the Southern Oregon
Economic Development Coalition, and Stacy Mitchell, a researcher with the
Institute for Local Self Reliance and author of The Home Town Advantage: How to Defend Your Main Street Against Chain Stores and Why It Matters.

Wednesday, May 28: The positive and negative impacts of economic globalizaton on religious faiths. The guest is Ira Rifkin, author of Spriritual Perspectives on Globalization: Making Sense of Economic and Cultural Upheaval. Ira Rifkin is an award-winning journalist and the editor of Spiritual Innovators: Seventy-Five Extraordinary People Who Changed the World in the Past Century.

Thursday, May 29: Health, human rights, AIDS research, and the experience of working as a black woman in Africa. Tanya Taylor is a PhD. candidate from the University of Pennsylvania. She recently returned from working in Zimbabwe.

Friday, May 30: Good Morning America entertainment editor and movie critic Joel Siegel is the guest. At the age of fifty four, Siegel both became a father for the first time and learned he had cancer. Siegel's new book is Lessons For Dylan. It shares all the things he wants his young son, Dylan, to know---about his family history and who his father is and what he values.




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